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Shoeless Joe Jackson

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SPORTS
September 11, 1988 | United Press International
Sixty-eight years after he left baseball in disgrace, Shoeless Joe Jackson is becoming as much of a legend as the game's most celebrated heroes. The story of how the third-leading hitter in major league history was banned from the national pastime has long been a favorite of baseball scholars. Now, more than three decades since he died in relative obscurity in South Carolina, Hollywood is retelling the tale as a myth about the dangers of innocence, ignorance and greed.
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SPORTS
November 13, 2005 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Joe Anders, 84, was in his early teens living in Greenville, S.C., when Shoeless Joe Jackson came home to Greenville for good. Anders met Jackson and a friendship developed. Anders, recalling the time Jackson introduced him to Ty Cobb, told the Chicago Tribune: "Joe said, 'I want you to meet the greatest hitter who ever played the game of baseball. This is Ty Cobb.' "Cobb immediately said, 'No.
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SPORTS
July 11, 1989 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Shoeless Joe Jackson comes back to us now, seven decades later, seemingly trapped in a never-ending nightmare--still the haunted, broken figure from baseball's past. As baseball's best players go on display in Anaheim today at the All-Star game, spectators might wonder how many of the million-dollar athletes will one day wind up enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame. But through the mist of time, Shoeless Joe returns, to show us that being an all-star isn't necessarily enough.
SPORTS
July 29, 2001 | BRIAN BERGSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Embedded in the sad story of "Shoeless" Joe Jackson is another legendary tale: that of his beloved bat, "Black Betsy," which he used throughout his career, even after being banished from the game. For decades after Jackson's death in 1951, few knew the fate of the warped hickory bat. Now, the man who inherited Black Betsy--and quietly stowed it on a bookcase in South Carolina--has decided to see what it can fetch at auction.
SPORTS
June 20, 1999 | HAL BOCK, Associated Press
If Shoeless Joe Jackson conspired to fix the 1919 World Series, he certainly went about it in a strange way. Jackson batted .375 with a record 12 hits and had the only home run of the Series. He drove in six runs and threw out five runners trying to score. "Could have had three others, if bad cutoffs hadn't been made," he once said. But then, with a couple of pitchers and infielders implicated in the Black Sox scandal, it's understandable that some of Jackson's throws weren't handled cleanly.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1989
. . . In Universal's "Field of Dreams," actor Ray Liotta--playing legendary Shoeless Joe Jackson--swings right-handed. The real Shoeless Joe was a leftie. . . . Oh, no! Upcoming from Troma: "The Toxic Avenger: Part III, The Last Temptation of Toxie."
SPORTS
December 4, 1999
Since major league baseball is having a meeting with Pete Rose and his attorney, when can we expect the meeting with Shoeless Joe Jackson and his attorney? JON WALDRON Westchester For Pete's sake, let Pete in. SUZY KING Hermosa Beach
SPORTS
May 29, 1999 | Associated Press
Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig is "reviewing the entire file" of banned baseball legend Shoeless Joe Jackson, Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) said Friday. Harkin wrote to Selig in March, asking the commissioner to reinstate Jackson to baseball, a move that would make him eligible for the Hall of Fame. Harkin became interested in the 75-year-old case after the movie "Field of Dreams," in which Jackson is a central character, was filmed in his state. He asked Selig look at the records again.
SPORTS
June 3, 1999 | RANDY HARVEY
Say it ain't so, Sen. Harkin. Tom Harkin, a former Democratic presidential candidate from Iowa, is now campaigning to have Shoeless Joe Jackson reinstated to major league baseball so that he can be considered for the Hall of Fame. "Shoeless Joe Jackson was undoubtedly one of the most remarkable baseball players in the rich history of America's pastime," Harkin wrote in a letter dated March 30 to Commissioner Bud Selig.
SPORTS
December 4, 1999
Since major league baseball is having a meeting with Pete Rose and his attorney, when can we expect the meeting with Shoeless Joe Jackson and his attorney? JON WALDRON Westchester For Pete's sake, let Pete in. SUZY KING Hermosa Beach
NEWS
October 31, 1999 | PETE IACOBELLI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
To the world, Shoeless Joe was a legend. In the old row houses of Brandon Mill where he grew up and first showed his baseball prowess, Joe Jackson was just a man. Jackson's story of fame and sudden banishment as an alleged conspirator in the 1919 Chicago Black Sox gambling scandal has been told with passion, righteousness and bits of fantasy in movies and books.
SPORTS
July 20, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY
It wasn't so. Not even Jackson's most hostile witnesses in court proceedings subsequent to the 1919 World Series "Black Sox" fix ever placed Jackson at any meetings between his teammates and gamblers. Jackson, who died in 1951, was branded for life as one of the eight "Black Sox" despite the fact his performance in that White Sox-Cincinnati Red World Series hardly suggests a fixer at work: * He played without error in the outfield. * He led Series hitters with a .
SPORTS
June 20, 1999 | HAL BOCK, Associated Press
If Shoeless Joe Jackson conspired to fix the 1919 World Series, he certainly went about it in a strange way. Jackson batted .375 with a record 12 hits and had the only home run of the Series. He drove in six runs and threw out five runners trying to score. "Could have had three others, if bad cutoffs hadn't been made," he once said. But then, with a couple of pitchers and infielders implicated in the Black Sox scandal, it's understandable that some of Jackson's throws weren't handled cleanly.
SPORTS
June 3, 1999 | RANDY HARVEY
Say it ain't so, Sen. Harkin. Tom Harkin, a former Democratic presidential candidate from Iowa, is now campaigning to have Shoeless Joe Jackson reinstated to major league baseball so that he can be considered for the Hall of Fame. "Shoeless Joe Jackson was undoubtedly one of the most remarkable baseball players in the rich history of America's pastime," Harkin wrote in a letter dated March 30 to Commissioner Bud Selig.
SPORTS
May 29, 1999 | Associated Press
Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig is "reviewing the entire file" of banned baseball legend Shoeless Joe Jackson, Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) said Friday. Harkin wrote to Selig in March, asking the commissioner to reinstate Jackson to baseball, a move that would make him eligible for the Hall of Fame. Harkin became interested in the 75-year-old case after the movie "Field of Dreams," in which Jackson is a central character, was filmed in his state. He asked Selig look at the records again.
SPORTS
March 20, 1985 | United Press International
At least one state lawmaker says it just ain't so about Shoeless Joe. A resolution introduced Tuesday says Shoeless Joe Jackson did not help throw the 1919 World Series and urges baseball Commissioner Peter Ueberroth to absolve Jackson just as he has reinstated Willie Mays and Mickey Mantle.
BOOKS
December 26, 1993 | CHRIS GOODRICH
SHOELESS JOE JACKSON COMES TO IOWA: Stories by W.P. Kinsella (Southern Methodist University Press: $19.95; 141 pp.). It's odd that this collection hasn't previously been published in the U.S. (it was first released in Canada in 1980) because it contains one absolutely flawless story, two fine ones and a few merely good ones. The wonderful title story, which became the novel "Shoeless Joe" and then the movie "Field of Dreams," shows that W. P.
SPORTS
March 14, 1998
I am an avid sports fan, and I read the newspaper every day. I am sick and tired of hearing about Latrell Sprewell, Mike Tyson, the U.S men's Olympic hockey team and Michael Westbrook. These athletes are trash, they have disgraced themselves, their sports and yes, even America. Maybe our forgotten heroes like Pete Rose and Shoeless Joe Jackson should have taken lessons from these guys. If Pete or Joe had tried to kill his coach, eat his opponent, beat up his teammate and vandalize the front office instead of allegedly gambling on sports, I am confident that they would both have their rightful place in baseball's Hall of Fame.
SPORTS
July 10, 1997
BASEBALL * PETE ROSE, Cincinnati Reds: As manager of the Reds, the sport's all-time hit leader was charged with betting on baseball. He was the first person to be banned from baseball since 1943 and the only manager. Although he has never admitted to the charges, Rose is ineligible for the Hall of Fame and hasn't applied for reinstatement. * WILLIAM D. BOX, Philadelphia Phillies: The team's president was banned in 1943 for betting on his own team and was never reinstated.
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