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September 13, 2009 | Max Padilla
Mona Moore might not be a typical Venice shoe boutique. A disco ball hanging in the front window should be the first clue. But if you're a female footwear fanatic whose eyes light up at the mention of Dries Van Noten, Ann Demeulemeester and wedge boots, you might want to venture out to this latest Abbot Kinney retail spot. Lisa Bush and Anna Maria Varriano opened the original Mona Moore in Montreal seven years ago (the name is a riff on " mon amour " -- "my love" in French).
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BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
A major manufacturer of anti-fungal products has filed suit in Los Angeles against a competitor, contending that hundreds of thousands of shoe boxes coming into U.S. ports each day could contain a chemical used in rat repellent. The chemical, known as allyl isothiocyanate, is one of the main active ingredients in packing material made by YCM Co., of Taiwan, according to a civil lawsuit filed Tuesday by competitor Micro-Pak, of Hong Kong. The two companies both make items to thwart the growth of fungus or mold, which can ruin shoes during shipment by sea. Because most shoes sold in the U.S. come from Asia aboard cargo container ships that take multi-day ocean voyages, footwear manufacturers commonly put some kind of anti-moisture packing material in shoe boxes, usually silica gel packets or anti-fungal stickers or sheets.
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NEWS
September 25, 2013 | By Ingrid Schmidt, The gallery accompanying this post has been corrected, as indicated below.
Los Angeles-based luxury footwear and handbag designer Jerome C. Rousseau celebrates the fifth anniversary of his eponymous label this season. He marked the milestone earlier this month by cohosting an intimate soiree at the Petit Ermitage with French actress and model Roxane Mesquida, his muse and the star of his ad campaign. Guests who toasted the occasion included actresses Holland Roden, Krysten Ritter, Madisen Beaty and Haley Bennett; his designs are also worn by Olivia Wilde, Katie Holmes, Scarlett Johansson, Kristen Stewart and Charlize Theron, among others.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2014 | By Kari Howard
In the past few days at Coachella, there's been a lot of writhing and hip-pumping (deliberately avoiding the word that starts with T and rhymes with working). I've seen people standing so still, it's as if they're on a high that's left them feeling like they'll shatter if they take one step. And that was all just onstage. PHOTOS: Weekend 2 | Weekend 1 The range was so striking, I decided to rank some of these artists on the movement spectrum. Ranked from least action to most, they are: 10. Paul Westerberg of the Replacements.  First, this was one of my top two acts of the weekend - so fans, control your outrage, please.
HEALTH
January 1, 2007 | By Mary Beckman, Special to The Times
ONE thing that doesn't shrink when people get older are feet: They enlarge. More specifically, they flatten. The feet's tendons and ligaments lose some of their elasticity and don't hold the bones and joints together as tidily. When combined with other aging-related changes, the feet can encounter limits to how much use - or abuse - they can take. Dr. Steven Pribut, a podiatrist at George Washington University Medical Center in Washington, D.C., estimates that some people over the age of 40 can gain half a shoe size every 10 years.
NEWS
October 15, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
In the four years since establishing her eccentrically-English, namesake shoe line, Tabitha Simmons has earned quite a following. Beyonce loves her striped “Dolly” espadrille lace-ups so much she posted photos of them on Tumblr, while the “Early” moto boots are a go-to for Miranda Kerr. A model-turned-stylist and shoe designer, Simmons hails from Britain, where she actually got her start in the shoe business as a teenager, working Saturday afternoons at Oliver's Shoes.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2012 | By Jasmine Elist, Los Angeles Times
For a recent episode of the TV series "Modern Family," Raul Ojeda crafted a pair of shoes covered in red sequins for actor Jesse Tyler Ferguson. His character, Mitchell, shows off the shoes for a "Wizard of Oz"-themed birthday party he throws for his partner, Cam. A decade ago, Raul Ojeda was working as a shoe shiner. Now the 29-year-old is leaving his own footprint in Hollywood, supplying custom-made shoes to stars such as Steve Carell and Sally Field. Ojeda is the owner of Los Angeles-based Willie's Shoe Service, a shoe repair shop that has been providing footwear to the entertainment industry since 1956, when Willebaldo "Willie" Rivera opened a small business across from Paramount Pictures on Melrose Avenue.
SPORTS
July 20, 2002
Kobe Bryant stated that "he will try four or five different pairs of shoes" before he wears and in effect endorses a pair for a few million dollars. I suggest he try my Reebok Club C shoes, only $39.95 at most department stores. They look and fit great, and for this endorsement I will get zip, nada, nothing! Ron Cooper La Crescenta
SPORTS
May 23, 2013 | By Eric Pincus
Over the last year, LeBron James sold significantly more shoes in the United States than Kobe Bryant. James sold $300 million worth of his Nike signature shoes domestically, according to Kurt Badenhausen of Forbes.com . Bryant was second on the list at $50 million for his Nike signature shoes, followed by Carmelo Anthony's Jordan brand ($40 million) and Kevin Durant's Nike ($35 million). Dwight Howard's Adidas brand shoes brought in $5 million, on par with John Wall's Reebok shoe.  Derrick Rose, with Adidas, sold $25 million in the United States.
IMAGE
October 19, 2013 | By Melissa Magsaysay
While L.A style might seem to be synonymous with denim and the contemporary clothing market, several Southern California-based, high-end footwear labels are creating lines that preserve the art and quality of luxury shoes. Newbark Created by sisters and renowned stylists Marjan (the Dixie Chicks) and Maryam (Heidi Klum, the Rolling Stones) Malakpour, Newbark refers to the phrase "my dogs are barking" - meaning tired feet. The women created the line as an alternative to the standard ballet flat, infusing inspiration from Moroccan flats and 1920s men's slippers.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By John M. Glionna, This post has been updated
LAS VEGAS - With a flash of comedic timing, Hillary Clinton dodged the first controversy of her not-yet-declared 2016 presidential run after a heckler threw a shoe and a nearly half-century-old political document at the former first lady and secretary of State during a speech here. Shortly after Clinton began a keynote speech Thursday night at an Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries convention, a woman walked down the aisle and threw the items. She then turned around, put her hands in the air and walked away as security officers took her into custody.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Like many Americans last week, I greeted the news of David Letterman's retirement in 2015 with regretful acceptance. I love him with a love deep and true, but the man is pushing 70, and at least we could look forward to another year of his fine, cantankerous self. But now I cannot wait for him to go. From the moment it was announced Thursday that Stephen Colbert would be taking over "Late Show," I was ready to box up Letterman's stuff and move it myself. Because I have to know: Will Colbert change the nature of late night or will the bravest comedian on television just sell out?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
Following the news that he would be taking over "The Late Show" from David Letterman, Stephen Colbert took a moment on his show Thursday to pay tribute to his predecessor. He also addressed, albeit indirectly, his own promotion to one of the most coveted spots in late-night TV.  After an especially hearty opening round of applause, Colbert began, "There was some big news last week that slipped through my news crack. It concerns someone I've admired for years and yet surprisingly is not me. " It was, of course, Letterman.
NATIONAL
April 1, 2014 | By Michael Muskal, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
It's a decorous shoe that a woman would wear for a night on the town: a size 9 navy pump. Even the 5-inch heel doesn't seem out of place. But then there is the blood, which carries a different message. Jurors in Houston on Tuesday got their first real look at what prosecutors say was a murder weapon and defense lawyers argue was Ana Trujillo's only way of defending herself from her on-again, off-again boyfriend. Trujillo, 45, is charged with using her stiletto heel 25 times to pound Alf Stefan Andersson, 59, to death.
SPORTS
March 18, 2014 | By Chris Foster
This is Tucson's Mt. Rushmore, where two heads are better than four. An enlarged head shot of former Arizona coach Lute Olson was waved by a fan during Pac-12 Conference tournament games in Las Vegas last week. The guy next to him held aloft a similar-sized mug of current Wildcats Coach Sean Miller. A picture says 1,000 words? These two said job security. Miller came to Tucson in 2009 to find a program that had been in disrepair since Olson retired. The Wildcats were 40-29 in the two previous season and made the NCAA tournament both years, but that was not good enough for Arizona basketball.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
Toms, the Los Angeles company known for its comfy, eco-friendly footwear and its shoes-donating ways, is tiptoeing into an unusual product line: coffee. The philanthropic business, which sells shoes and eyewear under a One for One business model, made the announcement Tuesday in Austin, Texas, at the South by Southwest Interactive conference. For every bag of coffee purchased, Toms said it will be able to provide a week's worth of clean water to a person in a developing country.  "Through my travels, I found that some of the greatest coffee comes from developing countries," said Toms founder Blake Mycoskie in a statement.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1989 | JONATHAN WEBER
For $75,000 to $125,000, you, too, could get your foot in the door of the instant shoe repair business. Entrepreneur Magazine named shoe repair franchises "Opportunity of the Month" last December, and even the shoe chains that do not now have independently owned franchises are eagerly eyeing the possibility.
NEWS
August 21, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
It's an initiative you might call "red, white and shoe. " L.A.-based Toms shoes has announced an expanded* giving program at home, in the U.S. The company, whose One for One business model donates a pair of shoes to someone in need for every pair it sells, aims to give 1 million pairs of shoes to children in the U.S. by the end of 2014. New pairs of Toms shoes will be given to children in 35 states and access to eye care will be provided to children in three states, through sales of Toms eyewear.  Some of the company's U.S.-based giving partners are Save the Children , Feed the Children and Helen Keller International . Toms was founded by Blake Mycoskie in 2006, when he was traveling in Argentina and took a liking to the region's  alpargatas canvas worker shoes.  Looking for volunteer work near Buenos Aires, he came across a woman who had recently organized a shoe drive, which got him thinking about shoes being at the top of the list when relief organizations ask for donations.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Susan Denley, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
Noted designer George Esquivel is slated to show his 2014 spring shoe collection to the public on Saturday at Barneys New York in Beverly Hills.  Esquivel was one of 10 finalists in 2009 for the Council of Fashion Designers of America Fashion Fund, which showcases emerging design talent. He's also participated in the CFDA's Americans in Paris initiative to showcase American designers in the French fashion capital. Besides having his own line, Esquivel Shoes , he is the creative director of luggage maker Tumi.
NATIONAL
March 11, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- Saajid Badat had been through all the training, from firing weapons while riding a motorcycle to watching dogs and rabbits, trapped under glass, die slow, agonizing deaths as he learned poisoning techniques.    He had laughed with other Al Qaeda members as the self-confessed mastermind of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, scanned a list of tall buildings and crossed out the World Trade Center towers weeks after hijackers had destroyed them.  Now, Badat was ready to carry out Al Qaeda's next big mission, a plan to down two U.S. jetliners using bombs hidden in shoes.
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