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BUSINESS
September 26, 1994 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talk about an idea with legs--or maybe feet. Beverly Hills orthopedic surgeon Fred Swerdloff and his nurse-practitioner, Rose Lewis, saw an endless parade of limping patients whose back, knee and ankle pain could be blamed on a single source: high-heeled shoes. So Swerdloff and Lewis performed surgery on the standard fashion pump and came up with an unusual idea. They designed a shoe with a heel that can change height.
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BUSINESS
October 2, 1994
The "endless parade of limping patients" making their way painfully to the offices of orthopedic surgeons and podiatrists will not end with adjustable-heel shoes ("Adjustable Heel Pumps Shoes Sales," Sept. 26). Limping patients are primarily women, and they deserve better, particularly those on their feet a lot. Shoes should be designed to fit the human foot. Except for sports shoes and clunky, broad-toed shoes, the selection of sensible shoes is slim for women. Unfortunately, sensible shoes are not deemed as stylish as the pointed variety.
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BUSINESS
October 2, 1994
The "endless parade of limping patients" making their way painfully to the offices of orthopedic surgeons and podiatrists will not end with adjustable-heel shoes ("Adjustable Heel Pumps Shoes Sales," Sept. 26). Limping patients are primarily women, and they deserve better, particularly those on their feet a lot. Shoes should be designed to fit the human foot. Except for sports shoes and clunky, broad-toed shoes, the selection of sensible shoes is slim for women. Unfortunately, sensible shoes are not deemed as stylish as the pointed variety.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1994 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talk about an idea with legs--or maybe feet. Beverly Hills orthopedic surgeon Fred Swerdloff and his nurse-practitioner, Rose Lewis, saw an endless parade of limping patients whose back, knee and ankle pain could be blamed on a single source: high-heeled shoes. So Swerdloff and Lewis performed surgery on the standard fashion pump and came up with an unusual idea. They designed a shoe with a heel that can change height.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1992 | NANCY KAPITANOFF, Nancy Kapitanoff writes regularly about art for Westside/Valley Calendar.
There's room in this town for not just one, but two shows that highlight the art of the shoe. Complementing the 30-year survey of Salvatore Ferragamo's shoe designs at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Couturier Gallery is presenting Santa Cruz artist Gaza Bowen's recent shoe art in "The Shoe Show." Although some of her designs could be considered reminiscent of some of Ferragamo's, the two exhibits bear little resemblance.
NEWS
August 13, 1998
Sales of Wilson's Pro Staff tennis shoes for women will benefit the BREAST CANCER RESEARCH FOUNDATION. Look for BCRF logos on boxes and hang tags and an accompanying bookmark with breast health information.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1987
Bergquist complains about the oversize, white tennis shoes ("horrid shoes") that women are wearing these days. I think they're kinda cute; like Minnie Mouse outfits. And besides, they're a lot better than those floppy, hard heels that sound like a cavalry troop galloping by, like they're going into battle. I vote for quiet sneakers any time. JOHN DEGATINA Los Angeles
NEWS
October 25, 2012 | By Jenn Harris
Bond Girls are known for being ubiquitous symbols of beauty, class and style, so it's no surprise that actress Bérénice Marlohe has taken on the role. She plays "Sévérine" in the upcoming 23rd James Bond film "Skyfall," slated for a Nov. 9 release. The French beauty has been spotted around the globe proving just how stylish she can be in outfits worthy of any Bond love interest. She chose a sleeveless royal blue peplum number by Julien Macdonald at a photo call in Moscow and a draped aqua blue dress by Roksanda Ilincic in Istanbul.  Marlohe was photographed at a recent photo call for the film at the Crosby Street Hotel in New York City in a Salvatore Ferragamo fall 2012 military-green coat and Tod's knee-high boots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1992 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harry Pregerson may forever be known as the man who snatched a prisoner from the gas chamber. The 68-year-old judge, the son of an immigrant postal worker, became part of the somber history of capital punishment when he issued a last-minute reprieve only minutes before double murderer Robert Alton Harris was scheduled to die late last month. A shaken Harris was brought back and executed two hours later, after an irritated U.S.
NEWS
January 25, 1990
I was struck by the juxtaposition of two articles on the front page of the Jan. 10 View section: "Writers Row" about homeless artists and their struggle to keep the muse alive despite the agonies of poverty, and "Passions Grounded in Shoes" about women who collect large numbers of ultra-expensive designer shoes. I would not suggest that these women refrain from indulging in their passion. But, perhaps, in a spirit of social responsibility, they could find it in their hearts to donate the boxes the shoes come in to the less fortunate who may find them useful for repairing holes in the ceilings of their cardboard apartments.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1992 | NANCY KAPITANOFF, Nancy Kapitanoff writes regularly about art for Westside/Valley Calendar.
There's room in this town for not just one, but two shows that highlight the art of the shoe. Complementing the 30-year survey of Salvatore Ferragamo's shoe designs at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Couturier Gallery is presenting Santa Cruz artist Gaza Bowen's recent shoe art in "The Shoe Show." Although some of her designs could be considered reminiscent of some of Ferragamo's, the two exhibits bear little resemblance.
MAGAZINE
October 19, 1986 | IRENE CORBALLY KUHN, Irene Corbally Kuhn was a foreign correspondent in Shanghai and elsewhere in the Orient during the 1920s. She lives in New York City's Greenwich Village. and
Shanghai, known once as the Paris of the Orient, has persisted in the Western imagination as the essence of exoticism, excitement, color and vitality through wars, revolutions and decades of isolation. But vintage Shanghai, the city that epitomized those qualities, actually existed in all its extraordinary variety and complexity for only a very short span of time: during the years between the end of World War I and the capture of the Chinese part of the city by the Japanese in 1937.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2000 | CHRIS PASLES
The word "bolshoi" in Bolshoi Ballet means "big." It describes the size of the stage on which the company dances in Moscow, the lavish productions it's famous for and the composition of the troupe itself--some 212 dancers, 110 of whom are on its current American tour. But the ballet, created the same year as the American Revolution, 1776, is only part of the Bolshoi Theatre.
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