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Shoeshining

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1994 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometimes, during the depressingly long stretches between customers, Lee Calton sits in the big maroon highchair at the Burbank Airport and reminisces about the fast-stepping, spit-polished heyday of the professional shoeshine.
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IMAGE
June 9, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
LAS VEGAS - If Shinola has any brand resonance these days, it's most likely from the phrase: "You don't know [expletive] from Shinola," a World War II-era insult referencing the shoe polish manufactured by Shinola-Bixby Corp. But the brand is back on the scene and in a big way. Founded in 1907, the original Shinola (pronounced SHINE-ola), has been defunct for decades, but the nostalgic name and trademark rights were plucked out of has-been brand obscurity a few years back and applied to a modern-day range of retro-inspired, made-in-America products, including bicycles, leather journals and now handsome wristwatches that retail from $495 to $725.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2004 | Claire Luna, Times Staff Writer
It seems the ideal location for a shoeshine stand: across the street from Orange County's main courthouse, within spitting distance of legions of loafers that have lost their luster. A crosswalk leads right into the wooden shack Jimmy Van Blaricom built with a handsaw and hammer 15 years ago for someone else; he took over soon after. With no assistants, he shines every shoe himself for customers looking for the clothed-foot equivalent of a pedicure.
NATIONAL
February 23, 2013 | By Marisa Gerber
The Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh has an unofficial mayor: its longtime shoe shiner. For more than 30 years, Albert Lexie has roamed the hospital's halls, with a wide smile on his face and a tin of shoe wax in his hand. Lexie was coy about his age, but proud to point out he's spent almost every Tuesday and Thursday since 1981 at the hospital. He makes small talk, drops off small toys for the kids and offers $5 shoe shines. “He says I'm his best buddy,” Dr. Joseph Carcillo told the Los Angeles Times.
NEWS
April 8, 1986 | Associated Press
A judge who last month told a jobless black man to start shining shoes to finance child support payments on Monday accepted the man's plan to work instead as a cement pourer. Charles Martin told State District Judge Oliver Kitzman that the shoe-shining venture was unsuccessful because no one would pay his fee of $10 a shoe--the price he said he needed to finance the $225 monthly payments to his ex-wife to help support their 6-year-old son.
NEWS
February 17, 1986
It is still dark out when Dewey Wallace comes to work. There is almost no one on the street, but at 5:30 a.m., he sets up anyway. This does not involve anything elaborate. Two chairs on a stand. A few cans of shoe polish. Rags, a few brushes. And when the shoeshine stand is ready to go, Dew Wallace sits and waits. I found him at 2 p.m. I was his third customer of the day. His first customer had come a half-hour before.
NEWS
December 2, 1991 | SUSAN NAGLER PERLOFF, Perloff is a Philadelphia free-lance writer
It feels good. If I breathe deeply and concentrate on the rhythm, I bliss out. I'm getting my shoes shined. I'm sitting in a high, cinnamon-brown Leatherette chair, perched on the edge, my feet barely reaching the metal footrests. I feel like a little girl on a chair that's too big. I latch my heels on the footrests so they don't slide off with the pressure of the shine. A shoeshine is luxurious, sensual, voluptuous.
NEWS
March 6, 1986 | Associated Press
A black man who said he could not make his monthly child support payments because he was unemployed was given a $12 shoeshine kit by a judge, but the judge denied there were any racial overtones in his decision. Charles A. Martin believed the move by State District Judge Oliver Kitzman was "degrading and demeaning," Martin's attorney Bill Daniels said. "He felt the judge wouldn't have done the same thing to a white man." Daniels did not say whether any action was planned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1988 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
The shoeshine king of Woodland Hills was in step Wednesday with the booming Warner Center business district. Asa P. Stevenson had polished off a deal to open his third shoeshine stand at a high-rise at the western end of the San Fernando Valley. And he was brushing up on his negotiating skills in hopes of winning permission to open a fourth--and to launch a mobile shoeshine service that will travel between low-rise buildings. "The shoe-shining business is off and running," said Stevenson, 28.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1988 | STEVE HARVEY Times Staff Writer
The barber shop that housed Jack Stewart's shoeshine stand lost its lease last month and a 30-year tradition on the Westside seemed threatened--until Stewart's neighbors and customers found out. Then, a nearby restaurateur invited him onto his property and built him a new kiosk. Stewart's former boss gave him an antique clock to hang inside. Someone left a framed print at the stand when he wasn't looking. A customer printed up new signs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2009
The funeral for Santa Anita Park shoeshine man Eddie Logan, who died Saturday at 98, is scheduled for 11 a.m. Tuesday at Douglass & Zook Mortuary, 600 E. Foothill Blvd., Monrovia. Logan worked at the horse racing track for 74 years, from opening day Dec. 25, 1934, until early January.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2009 | Claire Noland
Eddie Logan, who ran a shoeshine stand at Santa Anita Park from the day the horse racing track opened in 1934 until a few weeks ago, died Saturday. He was 98. Logan, who in his younger years was a boxer as well as a baseball player in the Negro Leagues, died at his home in Monrovia after suffering a seizure and stroke in early January, the racetrack announced. Called "the foot man" by his many loyal customers, Logan was a fixture at the Arcadia track for 74 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2004 | Claire Luna, Times Staff Writer
It seems the ideal location for a shoeshine stand: across the street from Orange County's main courthouse, within spitting distance of legions of loafers that have lost their luster. A crosswalk leads right into the wooden shack Jimmy Van Blaricom built with a handsaw and hammer 15 years ago for someone else; he took over soon after. With no assistants, he shines every shoe himself for customers looking for the clothed-foot equivalent of a pedicure.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1999 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hustling for shoes to shine in Rio de Janeiro's airport two years ago, Vinicius de Oliveira approached a man in white tennis shoes. The man noticed him too--but not because he wanted his shoes polished. The man was film director Walter Salles and he saw something in the boy with long, thick, black eyelashes and light brown eyes that moved him. After auditioning nearly 2,000 boys for the role of Josue for his film "Central Station," Salles was drawn in by De Oliveira's authenticity and spunkiness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1999
Ventura resident Joseph E. Salado, retired owner of a shoe-shine shop, died Friday at a Ventura convalescent home after a lengthy illness. He was 92. Salado, the son of Pasqual and Guadalupe Salado, was born and raised in Morenzie, Ariz. He lived in Pomona before moving to Ventura County 63 years ago. He was married to Lydia Salado for 66 years. Salado owned and operated his shoe-shine shop in Ventura for more than 40 years. He then opened a drive-in shoe repair shop on East Main Street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1996 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sam Eason was a man of polish in every sense of the word. Not only could he make you look good at the three-seat shoeshine stand he ran in a corner of a parking garage in Los Angeles' high-rise district, Eason could make you feel good, too. With a few deft strokes he could resuscitate the most badly worn pair of wingtips. With a few deft words he could rejuvenate the weariest lawyer or stockbroker.
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | JOSEPH N. BELL
Hershell Hardimon didn't get over to the homeless folks around the Santa Ana Courthouse with his breakfast rolls and bread last Monday. "I didn't have anything sweet," he explained, "that would go very good with coffee in the morning." But he was there Tuesday. And Wednesday. Just as he's been there virtually every morning for the past three years--passing out food and a dash of his special brand of cheer to people who have neither.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1999
Ventura resident Joseph E. Salado, retired owner of a shoe-shine shop, died Friday at a Ventura convalescent home after a lengthy illness. He was 92. Salado, the son of Pasqual and Guadalupe Salado, was born and raised in Morenzie, Ariz. He lived in Pomona before moving to Ventura County 63 years ago. He was married to Lydia Salado for 66 years. Salado owned and operated his shoe-shine shop in Ventura for more than 40 years. He then opened a drive-in shoe repair shop on East Main Street.
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | TINA DAUNT
The fan mail has stopped. London doesn't check in anymore. Rockford, Ill., no longer calls for updates. After months of giving live radio reports daily from the lobby of the Criminal Courts Building during the O.J. Simpson trial, Irene Allen, the courthouse shoeshine booth operator, is back at her day job.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1994 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometimes, during the depressingly long stretches between customers, Lee Calton sits in the big maroon highchair at the Burbank Airport and reminisces about the fast-stepping, spit-polished heyday of the professional shoeshine.
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