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Shogi

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NEWS
August 19, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Intrigued by the challenge of a game far more difficult than chess, artificial-intelligence specialists from such unlikely places as England and North Korea have programmed computers to play shogi, or Japanese chess--and are aiming to beat the Japanese at their own game. Ever since the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue trounced chess master Gary Kasparov in 1997, shogi fans--Japan has about 12 million of them--have been wondering when their ancient art might also be humbled by the microchip.
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NEWS
August 19, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Intrigued by the challenge of a game far more difficult than chess, artificial-intelligence specialists from such unlikely places as England and North Korea have programmed computers to play shogi, or Japanese chess--and are aiming to beat the Japanese at their own game. Ever since the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue trounced chess master Gary Kasparov in 1997, shogi fans--Japan has about 12 million of them--have been wondering when their ancient art might also be humbled by the microchip.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1996 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If mental concentration were an energy source, then all the electricity needs of downtown Los Angeles could be met from brain waves of two young men kneeling on floor pillows today before a game board in a Little Tokyo hotel suite. There, for the first time in the United States, an important championship round of the chess-like Japanese game shogi is being played.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1996 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If mental concentration were an energy source, then all the electricity needs of downtown Los Angeles could be met from brain waves of two young men kneeling on floor pillows today before a game board in a Little Tokyo hotel suite. There, for the first time in the United States, an important championship round of the chess-like Japanese game shogi is being played.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1990 | Cristina Lee, Times staff writer
Hoping to get a leg up in the Japanese market, Rainbow Technologies Inc. in Irvine said it has begun marketing in Japan a device designed to prevent unauthorized copying of computer software for NEC Corp. personal computers. Peter Craig, Rainbow's sales and marketing vice president, said a custom microchip makes the device compatible with NEC's personal computers. NEC dominates the PC market in Japan. The announcement comes several weeks after Irvine-based AST Research Inc.
WORLD
November 2, 2012 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
TEHRAN - Iran may be a major foreign policy issue in U.S. presidential politics, but few attendees at an Iranian government-organized rally Friday denouncing the United States seemed concerned about the outcome of the upcoming American election. "I don't care who becomes the next president in the U.S.," said Hasan Mousavi, 27, a shoe store owner who sports a bushy black beard. "The sanctions will not be lifted no matter who is president. " Like many Iranians, Mousavi says he has felt the sting of the tough economic sanctions that the Obama administration and the European Union have slapped on his nation because of its controversial nuclear program.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Adm. Isoroku Yamamoto, commander in chief of Japan's Combined Fleet, is regarded as the brilliant mastermind of the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor. Yet he was personally opposed to war with the United States, convinced that Japan could never win, and two months before the attack wrote of his depression: "I find my present position extremely odd--obliged to . . . pursue unswervingly a course that is precisely the opposite of my personal views."
NEWS
April 28, 1995 | GEORGE RAMOS
In Marin County, the powers that be in Novato have come up with a novel idea to easily identify cats that get lost or injured: Inject microchips into the city's estimated 20,000 felines. The City Council adopted an ordinance that would require the licensing and sterilization of all outdoor cats. The preferred method of tagging the cats is the injection of a microchip under the skin at the ruff of the neck.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1997 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tokyo homemaker Takako Hida, 26, is fed up with Japanese television--the "stupid" quiz shows, music programs that "always have the same singers and the same songs" and current affairs shows with "meaningless themes." Arguably, that is about to change: The blessing of 350 TV channels will soon descend on Japan. And while more television is rarely linked with more individualism, media executives in this homogenous nation are touting the explosion in television fare just that way.
TRAVEL
October 21, 1990 | JENNIFER MERIN
The residents of Kyoto, one of Japan's loveliest and most tradition-conscious cities, know the importance of maintaining their old shops and preserving the crafts associated with them. One of the city's most treasured gems is Miyawaki Baisen'an, famous for its fans. In Japan, fans have been an important part of culture from ancient times to the present. For shoppers, fans are affordable, useful, appealing souvenirs, and there is no place better to learn about them than at Miyawaki Baisen'an.
BOOKS
August 27, 1989 | David Williams, Williams, a resident of Japan since 1968, now comments on Japanese affairs for a wide range of publications, including the Los Angeles Times, after a long career as a professional translator and interpreter. and
When the television version of "Shogun" splashed onto our screens back in 1981 (remember Richard Chamberlain poking his fingers through Japanese shogi doors), Japan buffs were keen to know whether this popular series provided a genuine slice of late medieval Japanese life. These were passionate Japanophiles, who even then could belly up to the sushi bar, and order with the best of them. As with their food, these people were seeking the genuine article in their fiction.
WORLD
March 14, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Barbara Demick and Laura King, Los Angeles Times
A fresh explosion rocked a crippled nuclear complex as rescuers from around the world converged on Japan's devastated earthquake zone, searching for survivors and ministering to the sick and hungry. With the death toll expected to ultimately reach the tens of thousands, more than a half-million people have been displaced by growing radiation fears and the massive swath of destruction. Japanese officials ordered people near the Fukushima No. 1 plant -- around which a 12-mile evacuation zone had already been carved out -- to stay indoors after a hydrogen blast in the containment building of one of its six reactors, similar to one that occurred Saturday in a separate reactor.
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