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Shogun

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By David Colker
Screenwriter Eric Bercovici knew he was not the first choice to adapt "Shogun," the blockbuster 1975 novel by James Clavell about an English seaman marooned in 17th century Japan. Bercovici, who worked on the Paramount lot, read the novel anyway. "I knew right away how to adapt it," he said in a 1981 Los Angeles Times interview. "But damned if I would tell them. " Other writers fell by the wayside, and he was called to meet with Clavell, who had creative control over a proposed TV miniseries based on the book.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By David Colker
Screenwriter Eric Bercovici knew he was not the first choice to adapt "Shogun," the blockbuster 1975 novel by James Clavell about an English seaman marooned in 17th century Japan. Bercovici, who worked on the Paramount lot, read the novel anyway. "I knew right away how to adapt it," he said in a 1981 Los Angeles Times interview. "But damned if I would tell them. " Other writers fell by the wayside, and he was called to meet with Clavell, who had creative control over a proposed TV miniseries based on the book.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2013 | By Greg Braxton
O.J. Simpson is back on the run, thanks to Fox. Fox and FX Productions are developing a movie based on Simpson's murder trial as part of its long-form "event" slate. "The Run of His Life: The People v. O.J. Simpson" will be based on legal journalist Jeffrey Toobin's book of the same name. Also planned is a new version of "Shogun," based on the novel by James Clavell, which will revolve around the brutal world of feudal Japan. "Shogun" was produced as a 10-part miniseries for NBC in 1980.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2013 | By Greg Braxton
O.J. Simpson is back on the run, thanks to Fox. Fox and FX Productions are developing a movie based on Simpson's murder trial as part of its long-form "event" slate. "The Run of His Life: The People v. O.J. Simpson" will be based on legal journalist Jeffrey Toobin's book of the same name. Also planned is a new version of "Shogun," based on the novel by James Clavell, which will revolve around the brutal world of feudal Japan. "Shogun" was produced as a 10-part miniseries for NBC in 1980.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1987
A 60-foot sportfishing boat taking on water through a two-by-three-foot gash made it to shore after a 10-hour ordeal Thursday, the Coast Guard reported. The fishing boat Shogun radioed a distress signal at 1:10 a.m., apparently after hitting one of the Coronado Islands. The Coast Guard responded by sending a helicopter to drop a pump to the disabled boat, Coast Guard Chief Petty Officer Robert Lowry said. At 3:30 a.m.
NEWS
May 8, 1994
Concerning your Reruns to Rewatch (TV Times, April 17): James Michener and James Clavell do have the same first names, and they both write historical fiction, but "Shogun" was written by Clavell, not Michener. A small error, but for James Michener and James Clavell fans, an important fact. Bob Zhe, Westminster
SPORTS
January 8, 1993 | DAN STANTON
Anglers aboard the Los Angeles Harbor boats Sportking and Shogun started the New Year with catches of rockfish and sheephead. The Shogun worked San Nicholas Island and returned with 360 rock cod and 130 sheephead. The 29 anglers aboard the Shogun caught limits of rock cod. With squid available for bait, catches of yellowtail were reported by the Wicked Wahine. The three anglers aboard the boat reported catching 13 yellowtail offshore of Catalina.
OPINION
February 20, 2013
Re "Harry Truman, Lincoln's heir," Opinion, Feb. 17 Robert Shogan is correct that President Harry S. Truman did more for the cause of African American rights than his predecessor Franklin D. Roosevelt or his successor Dwight D. Eisenhower. Yet Shogan is unfair to Lincoln's Republican successors, who had better records than Democratic presidents before Roosevelt. He quotes W.E.B. DuBois in 1922 as commenting that neither Republican nor Democratic presidential candidates were to be trusted, without noting that DuBois in 1912 made the mistake of supporting Democrat Woodrow Wilson, who segregated the federal civil service - the worst act of any post-Civil War president.
BOOKS
February 17, 1991
I sometimes wonder how thoroughly critics read the books that they review. Recently, one newspaper critic told me, in all sincerity: "I've already written the review of your book, but I'd like to have a copy so that I can read it anyway." This incident came to mind when I read Leslie Helm's review of my book, "Shogun's Ghost: The Dark Side of Japanese Education" (Dec. 2). Helm said the book contained little independent research. Thus she overlooked at least five chapters of personal surveys and interviews of teachers, parents, acquaintances and a couple of hundred students.
OPINION
February 20, 2013
Re "Harry Truman, Lincoln's heir," Opinion, Feb. 17 Robert Shogan is correct that President Harry S. Truman did more for the cause of African American rights than his predecessor Franklin D. Roosevelt or his successor Dwight D. Eisenhower. Yet Shogan is unfair to Lincoln's Republican successors, who had better records than Democratic presidents before Roosevelt. He quotes W.E.B. DuBois in 1922 as commenting that neither Republican nor Democratic presidential candidates were to be trusted, without noting that DuBois in 1912 made the mistake of supporting Democrat Woodrow Wilson, who segregated the federal civil service - the worst act of any post-Civil War president.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter
Stormdancer The Lotus War Book One Jay Kristoff St. Martin's/Thomas Dunne: 336 pp., $24.99 With its geisha girls in gas masks and canvas blimps spewing black exhaust as they chug across the sky, "Stormdancer" paints a vivid picture of a decrepit, steampunk Japan. It's startling to witness a country that so reveres nature presented in such an environmentally compromised position, as it is in the kickoff to Jay Kristoff's "The Lotus War" series. But it's this inventive juxtaposition that makes "Stormdancer" such a thrilling addition to the increasingly tired yet continuously expanding dystopian scene.
SPORTS
August 3, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
On a November 2006 evening in Sacramento, two young fighters shared in victory inside the Ultimate Fighting Championship octagon. One was Georges St-Pierre, the now veteran welterweight champion who used his breakthrough win over Matt Hughes as a career-defining springboard to become the face of the UFC. The other was Brandon Vera, who that night defeated former heavyweight champion Frank Mir by first-round technical knockout, and then fell victim...
SPORTS
August 2, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
The last time Mauricio “Shogun” Rua fought at Staples Center, he was -- for lack of a better word -- robbed. Despite hammering then-light-heavyweight champion Lyoto Machida with leg kicks and being more active, Rua suffered a dubious unanimous-decision loss that so outraged Ultimate Fighting Championship President Dana White that an immediate rematch was ordered. Rua won that by first-round knockout. Saturday, Rua (20-6) returns as the favorite to regain another title shot when he fights San Diego's Brandon Vera (12-5)
SPORTS
November 18, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Dan Henderson's distinguished career as a mixed martial arts fighter should be setting like the sun at age 41. Instead, the Temecula fighter has put together perhaps his most impressive year yet, winning the Strikeforce light-heavyweight championship, scoring a technical knockout against Fedor Emelianenko in July and earning a return to the Ultimate Fighting Championship. Saturday night, Henderson (28-8) will try to improve to 4-0 in the last 12 months when he takes on former UFC light-heavyweight champion Mauricio "Shogun" Rua (20-5)
SPORTS
February 5, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Anderson Silva did not do much of anything in the first three minutes of his Ultimate Fighting Championship title defense Saturday night against Vitor Belfort. Then came the kick. Unleashing a wicked left kick that moved Belfort's jaw toward his nose, Silva knocked down the former UFC champion, hesitated briefly to ensure there were signs of alertness, then moved in for a right punch and a left that led referee Mario Yamasaki to stop the fight at the 3-minute 25-second mark.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1989
Santa Claus comes in all forms and nationalities and, in Little Toyko today, he will be wearing an authentic Samurai costume along with his traditional white beard. The occasion is the Eighth Annual Shogun Santa Children of the World Parade, expected to draw about 1,000 youths from more than 20 schools and organizations. The parade will start at 1 p.m. and will be followed by the release of 1,000 holiday balloons and performances by taiko drummers.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1985 | DENISE GELLENE
Southern California Edison celebrated a "first" recently, but it had nothing to do with electric power. The Rosemead-based utility became the first U.S. corporation to sell a dollar-denominated bond in Japan, called a "shogun" bond in investment circles. After Japan opened its capital markets to foreign corporations last year, a number of companies have sold debt denominated in yen, nicknamed "samurai" bonds.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2010 | By Eric Banks, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet A Novel David Mitchell Random House: 484 pp., $26 David Mitchell's new work, "The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet," is conventional in more ways than one. Not only is the novel, set in Japan at the end of the 18th century, the least experimental book the British novelist has ever written — in fact, it cleanly passes as "historical fiction" — but with each passing book, he...
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