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Shoichiro Toyoda

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NEWS
May 21, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One is the illegitimate son of a wealthy industrialist. The foundation of another's fortune was a long-ago U.S.-backed loan. A third is a notorious high-stakes gambler liable to risk millions of dollars in a day at the racetrack, while yet another furnishes his house in plastic. A capitalist who backed a revolution is on the list, as is a refugee from communism who is now devoting much of his energy to courting his giant Communist neighbors.
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BUSINESS
February 5, 2010 | By Coco Masters
As the first family member to lead Toyota Motor Corp. in 14 years, Akio Toyoda had a lot to prove, and his handling of the automaker's sudden-acceleration problems is testing his mettle. Nicknamed the "prince" by Japanese media, the 53-year-old grandson of company founder Kiichiro Toyoda took over as the youngest president in the company's history eight months ago after Toyota's biggest annual loss -- $4.4 billion for its last fiscal year. Despite his age, however, Toyoda's 25-year track record at Toyota -- he started as a junior manager and was the first in his family to take Toyota's management exam -- suggests that he's a strong manager with a fresh perspective.
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BUSINESS
July 30, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Toyota Motor Corp. on Wednesday announced a new president for the first time in a decade, raising hopes among some here that new leadership might also mean a change in the company's strategy. Toyota is widely admired as the world leader in producing high-quality autos at low cost. But it is also notorious for driving its employees hard, squeezing suppliers, pushing aggressively for market share worldwide, and refusing to help ease trade friction by moving more of its production away from Japan.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Toyota Motor Corp. on Wednesday announced a new president for the first time in a decade, raising hopes among some here that new leadership might also mean a change in the company's strategy. Toyota is widely admired as the world leader in producing high-quality autos at low cost. But it is also notorious for driving its employees hard, squeezing suppliers, pushing aggressively for market share worldwide, and refusing to help ease trade friction by moving more of its production away from Japan.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2010 | By Coco Masters
As the first family member to lead Toyota Motor Corp. in 14 years, Akio Toyoda had a lot to prove, and his handling of the automaker's sudden-acceleration problems is testing his mettle. Nicknamed the "prince" by Japanese media, the 53-year-old grandson of company founder Kiichiro Toyoda took over as the youngest president in the company's history eight months ago after Toyota's biggest annual loss -- $4.4 billion for its last fiscal year. Despite his age, however, Toyoda's 25-year track record at Toyota -- he started as a junior manager and was the first in his family to take Toyota's management exam -- suggests that he's a strong manager with a fresh perspective.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1989
Toyota Motor Corp. expects its 1990 domestic sales to grow 8% from this year while exports remain stable, President Shoichiro Toyoda was quoted as saying today. Surging demand will boost domestic sales for a seventh consecutive year, to a record 2.48 million vehicles next year compared to this year's estimated sales of 2.30 million, Kyodo News Service quoted Toyoda as telling reporters.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Slow Recovery Predicted: The leaders of Japan's four most powerful business associations said the ailing economy will improve this year but that the recovery will be spotty and slow. Shoichiro Toyoda, chairman of the Japan Federation of Economic Organizations, predicted growth of between 2% and 3% this year after a rise of less than 2% in 1994.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Toyota to Import Station Wagons From U.S.: Toyota Motor Corp., moving to buy more U.S.-made products, will bring in station wagons built at its plant in Kentucky and may use Ford Motor Co. parts for the first time. Starting in late August, the company said, it will import 700 station wagons a month from Toyota Motor Manufacturing U.S.A. Inc. in Georgetown, Ky.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1987
Shoichiro Toyoda estimated that Toyota Motor Corp. will realize record high sales of autos in Japan this year, while exports will continue to decline due to the high value of the Japanese yen. Toyota's exports fell last year by 100,000 units to 1.88 million cars and are expected to drop to 1.82 million this year, Toyoda added at a news conference. In the domestic Japanese market, he said Toyota expects to sell 1.81 million cars, up from an all-time high of 1.75 million in 1986.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One is the illegitimate son of a wealthy industrialist. The foundation of another's fortune was a long-ago U.S.-backed loan. A third is a notorious high-stakes gambler liable to risk millions of dollars in a day at the racetrack, while yet another furnishes his house in plastic. A capitalist who backed a revolution is on the list, as is a refugee from communism who is now devoting much of his energy to courting his giant Communist neighbors.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1999 | Associated Press
Toyota Motor Corp. announced a major executive reshuffling aimed at helping the leading Japanese auto maker navigate drastic changes in the global auto industry. Fujio Cho, an executive who ran Toyota's U.S. production arm for six years, was named president of the company, succeeding Hiroshi Okuda. Okuda will remain as chairman, a post similar to chief executive in the U.S. Okuda said Cho is well-suited to lead Toyota during these "turbulent times" of consolidation in the industry.
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