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Shon Leblanc

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1996 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Ibsen's unintentionally proto-feminist "A Doll's House" receives a thoughtful, technically pristine production at Actors Co-op's Crossley Theatre. Although Ibsen's challenging, frustrating drama certainly does not defeat director Elaine Welton Hill, the production never quite catches fire under her competent but seldom meteoric staging.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2003 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Peau de soie pumps. Sexy chiffon chemises. Plumed hats worthy of Audubon Society endorsements. Hello, haute couture. In Theatre Neo's audacious, ovary-to-the-wall staging of Clare Boothe Luce's venomous 1936 comic play "The Women," the Hudson Avenue Theatre has become a pristine Vogue magazine spread, where New York society dames have better turnout than a Balanchine ballerina.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2002 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Triumph of Love" is a triumph for Long Beach's International City Theatre. Like "Side Show," "Triumph of Love" is a little musical that didn't last long on Broadway in late 1997 but appears very much alive in the more intimate environs of a Southern California mid-size theater in 2002. This "Triumph" shares a leading lady with the Colony Theatre's recent production of "Side Show."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1999 | JANA J. MONJI
Michele Farr is beautifully luminous as the generous Ranyevskaya. She understands noblesse oblige, but not the economics of hard reality. Francoise Giroday plays her brother, Gayev, as a slightly annoying, but sweetly ineffectual snob in a well-acted, elegant production of Anton Chekhov's "The Cherry Orchard," at the Interact Theatre. Well-dressed and socially smooth, these siblings recoil from the brutally blunt Lopakhin (Joel Anderson).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2001 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
"They Shoot Horses, Don't They?" at the Greenway Court Theatre is a vibrantly realized stage adaptation of Horace McCoy's Depression-era novel. Adapters Rick Sparks and Gary Carter faithfully preserved the essence of the 1935 original, which also was adapted for a 1969 movie. In his shrewd environmental staging, director Sparks casts us, the audience, as the spectators at a dance marathon. Set designer James Eric has reconfigured the Greenway Court into an old-fashioned dance pavilion and more.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2003 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
A bittersweet patina of genuine sorrow overlays "Uncle Vanya" at the Crossley Terrace Theatre in Hollywood. Originally slated to open on April 11, the Actors Co-op mounting of Anton Chekhov's 1899 masterpiece of emotional indecision was postponed when founding member David Schall, who played Serebriakov, suffered a fatal coronary shortly before curtain time. Under such circumstances, carrying on becomes noteworthy.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1995 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Actors Co-op at the Crossley Theatre continues a winning streak with its production of Bernard Pomerance's "The Elephant Man." Mark Henderson's staging captures the bold metaphors in Pomerance's play, along with its pathos, austerity and wry humor. Henderson, who also designed the play's set, re-creates Victorian London--its swirling humanity, its gross extremes of poverty and privilege--with effective simplicity.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2001 | Philip Brandes
The very idea of irrigating low-budget camp with big-budget production values might seem like a contradiction, but there's no denying the rosy bloom of a well-crafted staging as "Little Shop of Horrors" at Hollywood's Crossley Theatre entwines audiences in its tendril mercies.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2002 | Philip Brandes
Whatever layers of subtle nuance might lurk within the post-vaudevillian subtext of the popular "Bullshot Crummond," they remain as elusive as ever in a goofy, unusually elaborate revival from Actors Co-op. This slender spoof of 1940s schlock crime-buster serials was the brainchild of Britain's aptly named Low Moan Spectacular troupe (Ron House, Diz White, John Neville-Andrews, Alan Shearman and Derek Cunningham).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1999 | JANA J. MONJI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In these politically correct times, there's something a bit daring about dusting off a 1961 musical that plays on sexist attitudes. Frank Loesser's "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying" was revived at La Jolla Playhouse in 1994, going on to a successful Broadway run that won its star, Matthew Broderick, a Tony in 1995. This revival at the Colony Studio Theatre doesn't have the high-tech computerized imagery or the star wattage of that production.
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