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TRAVEL
July 11, 2004
The picture accompanying "Denver Show, African Roots," [News, Tips & Bargains, May 30] was magnificent. Readers who cannot travel to Denver this summer should mark their calendars for late July because they will have an opportunity to see in Pasadena an array of African sculpture from Zimbabwe carved by second- and third-generation Shona artists. Exhibit-goers can stroll through the grounds of Neighborhood Church, 301 N. Orange Grove Ave., where I am a member and volunteer, to view large garden sculptures on the lawn, as well as smaller sculptures in the airy chapel.
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WORLD
December 22, 2007 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
We are puttering along in an ancient pickup with no brakes to speak of, dodging the potholes. Every bolt seems to groan with effort, but Max Mkandla says the car is doing well. He speaks rather like a proud father discussing his brightest child. "I'm trying to protect these tires," Max says. There's a pause. "Because I haven't got a spare." I'm taking a turn at the wheel.
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NEWS
March 18, 1990 | NEIL HENRY, THE WASHINGTON POST
Of all the historians, anthropologists, archeologists, tourists, mystics and assorted crackpots who have visited this centuries-old site in recent years, none seemed to impress the park rangers more than a woman from New York named Martha. Martha was an energetic middle-age woman with bright silver hair who introduced herself as a "research psychic" and asked to spend a night here under the stars. Her mission, she told the rangers, was to contact the spirits of the Great Zimbabwe, a mammoth collection of dry stone ruins whose man-made origins have been debated by experts for more than a century.
TRAVEL
July 11, 2004
The picture accompanying "Denver Show, African Roots," [News, Tips & Bargains, May 30] was magnificent. Readers who cannot travel to Denver this summer should mark their calendars for late July because they will have an opportunity to see in Pasadena an array of African sculpture from Zimbabwe carved by second- and third-generation Shona artists. Exhibit-goers can stroll through the grounds of Neighborhood Church, 301 N. Orange Grove Ave., where I am a member and volunteer, to view large garden sculptures on the lawn, as well as smaller sculptures in the airy chapel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1992 | MICHAEL DORRIS, Michael Dorris is an anthropologist and writer ("The Broken Cord" and, with his wife Louise Erdrich, "The Crown of Columbus"). His first book for children, "Morning Girl," will be published in September
In July, in Muusha, a hamlet arranged on a plateau in of southeastern Zimbabwe, I met the other side of fear. I was there to visit a health-delivery project funded by Save the Children, the board of which I recently joined, but all normal questions were irrelevant. Muusha had gone dry. Gerry Salole, the Ethiopian director of Save the Children's southern African operation, stopped our Toyota halfway up a rocky incline so that we could talk to a woman he recognized.
WORLD
December 22, 2007 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
We are puttering along in an ancient pickup with no brakes to speak of, dodging the potholes. Every bolt seems to groan with effort, but Max Mkandla says the car is doing well. He speaks rather like a proud father discussing his brightest child. "I'm trying to protect these tires," Max says. There's a pause. "Because I haven't got a spare." I'm taking a turn at the wheel.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1996 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Apart from its inherent visual splendor, a spirit of cultural renewal and jubilant pride pervades the display of indigenous art from Zimbabwe, now in the CSUN gallery. With examples of contemporary Shona sculpture and fabric art by women in the village of Weya, the work here is wrested from village life and from the heart of a culture only recently freed.
TRAVEL
October 3, 1993 | LEE BROWN, Lee Brown is a professor at San Diego State University, and an amateur collector of folk art.
It is a long and sometimes rocky road to the source of Shona stone sculptures, but lovers of three-dimensional art may find the trip to eastern Africa worthwhile despite the bumps, many of which are more than figurative. The quarry and sculptor cooperative, Tengenenge, is the principal creative font of the carved stone. It is a 4,500-acre, one-time tobacco farm, about 65 miles north of Harare near the village of Guruve, and it is reachable by four-wheel drive vehicle.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2005 | From Associated Press
Two former senior executives at advertising agency Ogilvy & Mather were convicted of conspiring to overbill the government for a campaign warning children about drugs. Thomas Early, 49, and Shona Seifert, 44, each face up to five years in prison on multiple counts of fraud, false claims and false statements. Sentencing was set for May 16 in U.S. District Court in New York.
NEWS
April 30, 1995
Spirits in Stone is a jumble of quiet surprises, all of them pleasant, some of them emotionally powerful, at the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History. The exhibit and sale showcases dozens of stone sculptures created by artists of the Shona people in the southeastern African nation of Zimbabwe. The exhibit runs through May 14. Artists such as Edronce Rukodzi, who is on site at varying times working on a piece, don't make drawings beforehand.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1996 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Apart from its inherent visual splendor, a spirit of cultural renewal and jubilant pride pervades the display of indigenous art from Zimbabwe, now in the CSUN gallery. With examples of contemporary Shona sculpture and fabric art by women in the village of Weya, the work here is wrested from village life and from the heart of a culture only recently freed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1992 | MICHAEL DORRIS, Michael Dorris is an anthropologist and writer ("The Broken Cord" and, with his wife Louise Erdrich, "The Crown of Columbus"). His first book for children, "Morning Girl," will be published in September
In July, in Muusha, a hamlet arranged on a plateau in of southeastern Zimbabwe, I met the other side of fear. I was there to visit a health-delivery project funded by Save the Children, the board of which I recently joined, but all normal questions were irrelevant. Muusha had gone dry. Gerry Salole, the Ethiopian director of Save the Children's southern African operation, stopped our Toyota halfway up a rocky incline so that we could talk to a woman he recognized.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | NEIL HENRY, THE WASHINGTON POST
Of all the historians, anthropologists, archeologists, tourists, mystics and assorted crackpots who have visited this centuries-old site in recent years, none seemed to impress the park rangers more than a woman from New York named Martha. Martha was an energetic middle-age woman with bright silver hair who introduced herself as a "research psychic" and asked to spend a night here under the stars. Her mission, she told the rangers, was to contact the spirits of the Great Zimbabwe, a mammoth collection of dry stone ruins whose man-made origins have been debated by experts for more than a century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1991
A fire gutted a Palmdale mobile home Friday, Los Angeles County firefighters said. Firefighters arrived at the Sierra Vista Trailer Park in the 3200 block of East Avenue R near Lemsford Avenue at 7:12 p.m. and put out the flames within 12 minutes, fire dispatcher Lani Angquico said. One resident, a woman whose name was not released, was in good condition at Palmdale Hospital Medical Center after receiving treatment for smoke inhalation, Nurse Shona Smart said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2012 | By Margaret Gray
Danai Gurira's new play, “The Convert,” set in the 1890s in what would later become Zimbabwe, tells the story of a young African woman, Jekesai (the stunning, graceful Pascale Armand), who converts to Catholicism to escape an arranged marriage, grows devout and finds herself at the center of a bloody cultural upheaval. To sum Gurira up efficiently would require more backslashes than a URL. Born in Ohio to African academics, she was raised partly in America and partly in Zimbabwe.
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