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OPINION
October 18, 1987
The editorial quotes Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.) calling the tests "a provocation of the worst kind . . ." and reports the almost unanimous Senate resolution demanding a Soviet apology, etc. Where was the senator and the Senate during the year and a half that the USSR suspended all nuclear testing while U.S. testing continued unabated? Either we are for peace or for war. Escalating testing is for war. Stopping all testing hasn't been tried by the U.S. even though we have enough weapons at the ready to destroy all life on earth many times over.
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OPINION
April 9, 2013 | By James Mulvaney
Theodore Roosevelt was appalled by the lack of firearms training within the constabulary when he was appointed president of the New York City Police Department Board of Supervisors, a rank now known as police commissioner. He would, I suspect, be equally appalled by a National Rifle Assn.-funded study released last week that recommended putting guns in every school in America. Upon becoming New York's top cop in 1895, Roosevelt recognized the danger of large numbers of undertrained officers carrying firearms in crowded urban environments.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1989
The death of a 19-year-old man who shot himself Thursday night at a public shooting gallery was not an accident but a suicide, the Orange County coroner's office said on Friday. The victim, Ricky Son Dang of Huntington Beach, died after shooting himself in the head at 7:44 p.m. at the Firing Line, 17921 Jamestown Lane. Police initially reported the death as an accidental shooting. But on Friday, authorities said that subsequent investigation determined that the man deliberately shot himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2007 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
The crockery and foodstuffs in Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin's still-life paintings have been described as stand-ins for the slowly shifting social order of 18th century France. Peasant pottery mingles with aristocratic silver tumblers, while an emerging middle class of shiny copper pots adds an element of aspirational sturdiness.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2000 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Last year the London Observer called "Orphans" and "Croupier" the two best British movies of the year. A few years ago, this would have been enough to attract attention from an American independent company. But in an increasingly competitive marketplace, no one bit, and both films seemed doomed to be seen here only on home video.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2000 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Philharmonic is joining forces with the Shooting Gallery, a New York-based multimedia company that will finance and produce the remaining four installments of its beleaguered Filmharmonic series. The first should surface during the second half of next season, after music director Esa-Pekka Salonen returns from sabbatical. The project pairs A-list movie directors and composers in cinematic collaborations that the Philharmonic, providing live accompaniment, will premiere.
NEWS
May 12, 1996 | IAN STEWART, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Face down in a muddy, roadside ditch, Ahmed Younis lies small to avoid a burst of gunfire. The first shots whiz across Pakistan's contested border with India as the sun's last light fades behind the towering mountains. A 7 1/2-mile stretch of the Neelum Valley Road is the only supply route for Younis and his fellow villagers, who are caught in the cross-fire of Pakistan's 49-year-old dispute with India over ownership of the Himalayan state of Kashmir.
NEWS
May 19, 1992 | DAVID FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an ordinary weekend in Los Angeles County. The Lakers lost. Chances of rain gave way to partly sunny skies. And at least 53 people were shot--more than one an hour. Each day in Los Angeles County, dozens of people are struck by gunfire in incidents that pass with little notice outside the neighborhoods in which they occur.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2001 | RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ, Rachel Abramowitz is a Times staff writer. Times staff writer Corie Brown also contributed to this story
Last year's Shooting Gallery Christmas party should have been a festive occasion. The spot was the white-hot New York disco Centro-Fly, a blinding Op Art fantasy in black and white, and the company, a brash band of testosterone-fueled New Yorkers, appeared to be riding a hit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1989
A Vista man walked into an Escondido shooting gallery Thursday, rented a gun, bought ammunition and shot himself in the head, Escondido police said. Ronald Hugh Hamilton, 44, died a short time later of massive head injuries at Palomar Hospital, a police spokeswoman said. Witnesses told police that Hamilton entered Shooters Emporium, an indoor shooting gallery at 241 N. Marketplace, about 3 p.m., and rented a Smith & Wesson .357-caliber revolver, the spokeswoman said.
NEWS
March 23, 2004 | J. Michael Kennedy, Times Staff Writer
Despite two popular votes to prohibit the practice, Alaskan hunters using airplanes have tracked and killed more than 100 wolves to increase moose and caribou herds. The controversial policy has led to the killing of dozens of wolves in an area north of Anchorage, with the goal of eliminating up to 190 animals by April 30. Alaska has as many as 11,000 wolves and supporters want to expand the hunting areas.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2001
"As long as we were taking care of our third parties, the rest was used for general corporate purposes": Shooting Gallery co-founder Steve Carlis expounds on his financial philosophy in "Everything Ventured, Everything Lost" (by Rachel Abramowitz, Sept. 23). Had Carlis and his fellow executives treated the films and filmmakers they corralled with the same consideration as their "third party" investors, Shooting Gallery's demise might have taken another turn. Having served as the "godfather"/producer's representative for more than three years for "Croupier," Shooting Gallery's most important distribution success, I think it is apparent that had they seized the opportunity to maximize the film's potential with a marketing infusion that any other distributor blessed with an unexpected hit would have supported, the film's $7-million North American gross could have approached the $23-million take of "Memento," a later, critically acclaimed, multi-viewed thriller that was also released by a new independent.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2001 | RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ, Rachel Abramowitz is a Times staff writer. Times staff writer Corie Brown also contributed to this story
Last year's Shooting Gallery Christmas party should have been a festive occasion. The spot was the white-hot New York disco Centro-Fly, a blinding Op Art fantasy in black and white, and the company, a brash band of testosterone-fueled New Yorkers, appeared to be riding a hit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2001
Re "Disneyland Hanging Up Its Gun Belt," Sept. 3: Funny that Disney chooses to eliminate guns sold at Frontierland and certain guns on the amusement park rides. But Disney does not choose to eradicate the rifles at the coin-operated Shooting Exposition. There must be a good reason why the shooting gallery was not eliminated. Ray Gomez, spokesperson for Disneyland states that Disney chooses to keepthe shooting gallery "based on guest feedback." Try dollar feedback. Based on Amusement Business Magazine's estimates, Disneyland's attendance was up 3% to 13.9 million for the year 2000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2000
Re "Workers Race to Finish $8-Million Venice Boardwalk Project," Aug. 12: The Venice boardwalk has become a shooting gallery and the public is the target. It is impossible to walk there without enduring a constant demand for your money. There is no break in the commercial frenzy, no place where Ruth Galanter, the city councilperson in charge, allows people to be themselves. On the boardwalk, people count only if they have money to spend. The crowds on the boardwalk are not a sign of good land use. At the beach--a park--business should never be allowed to consume the public like this.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2000 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Last year the London Observer called "Orphans" and "Croupier" the two best British movies of the year. A few years ago, this would have been enough to attract attention from an American independent company. But in an increasingly competitive marketplace, no one bit, and both films seemed doomed to be seen here only on home video.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2001
"As long as we were taking care of our third parties, the rest was used for general corporate purposes": Shooting Gallery co-founder Steve Carlis expounds on his financial philosophy in "Everything Ventured, Everything Lost" (by Rachel Abramowitz, Sept. 23). Had Carlis and his fellow executives treated the films and filmmakers they corralled with the same consideration as their "third party" investors, Shooting Gallery's demise might have taken another turn. Having served as the "godfather"/producer's representative for more than three years for "Croupier," Shooting Gallery's most important distribution success, I think it is apparent that had they seized the opportunity to maximize the film's potential with a marketing infusion that any other distributor blessed with an unexpected hit would have supported, the film's $7-million North American gross could have approached the $23-million take of "Memento," a later, critically acclaimed, multi-viewed thriller that was also released by a new independent.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First-time writer-director Eric Mendelsohn won the directing award at the 1999 Sundance Film Festival for his eccentric black-and-white fable "Judy Berlin," starring a pre-"The Sopranos" Edie Falco and the late Madeline Kahn in her final film role. Like many Sundance entries, "Judy Berlin" attracted some studio nibbles, but none bit. Until now.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2000 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Philharmonic is joining forces with the Shooting Gallery, a New York-based multimedia company that will finance and produce the remaining four installments of its beleaguered Filmharmonic series. The first should surface during the second half of next season, after music director Esa-Pekka Salonen returns from sabbatical. The project pairs A-list movie directors and composers in cinematic collaborations that the Philharmonic, providing live accompaniment, will premiere.
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