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Shootings Afghanistan

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February 4, 1989 | From Reuters
A large Soviet military convoy pulled out of Kabul in a snowstorm during the night, leaving only a rear guard Friday in the besieged Afghan capital. Afghan soldiers questioned by reporters said the column of tanks, armored personnel carriers and trucks full of soldiers took three hours to file up the road to the 12,000-foot-high Salang Pass. Soviet sources confirmed that a big convoy had left and said only 1,000 to 1,500 troops remain, mainly guarding the city's airport.
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NATIONAL
November 24, 2012 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
On the morning of April 27 last year, Afghan Air Force Col. Ahmed Gul walked into a control room on the Afghan military side of the Kabul international airport. He was armed with a Smith & Wesson pistol provided by the United States military. Within minutes, eight U.S. Air Force advisors and an American contractor were shot dead. The advisors were executed with bullets to the head. The nine killings remain the single deadliest incident among insider attacks that have targeted U.S. and coalition forces in Afghanistan.
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NEWS
March 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
Soviet activist Andrei D. Sakharov has been told that Russian helicopter gunships fired on their own ground troops to prevent their capture by Afghan rebels, his son-in-law said Tuesday night. In the Soviet Union, Lt. Gen. Boris Gromov, who led the last contingent of Soviet troops out of Afghanistan on Feb. 14, said the allegation was "monstrous."
WORLD
August 23, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - A potentially serious rift has emerged in the way the Afghan and U.S. governments view "insider" shootings, instances of Afghan police and soldiers turning their guns on Western troops. Washington and NATO coalition officials have consistently said most of the shootings, which have claimed the lives of at least 10 U.S. service members this month alone, stem from personal disputes, stress, cultural differences and battle fatigue, with a small percentage of the assailants acting at the behest of the Taliban.
NATIONAL
November 24, 2012 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
On the morning of April 27 last year, Afghan Air Force Col. Ahmed Gul walked into a control room on the Afghan military side of the Kabul international airport. He was armed with a Smith & Wesson pistol provided by the United States military. Within minutes, eight U.S. Air Force advisors and an American contractor were shot dead. The advisors were executed with bullets to the head. The nine killings remain the single deadliest incident among insider attacks that have targeted U.S. and coalition forces in Afghanistan.
WORLD
August 23, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - A potentially serious rift has emerged in the way the Afghan and U.S. governments view "insider" shootings, instances of Afghan police and soldiers turning their guns on Western troops. Washington and NATO coalition officials have consistently said most of the shootings, which have claimed the lives of at least 10 U.S. service members this month alone, stem from personal disputes, stress, cultural differences and battle fatigue, with a small percentage of the assailants acting at the behest of the Taliban.
WORLD
September 7, 2002 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Hamid Karzai said Friday that an assassin who tried to kill him the day before "had links to Al Qaeda," but he vowed that neither the shooting nor a car bombing that killed at least 24 Afghans here would divert his country from its road to recovery. At the same time, Karzai said the two attacks Thursday were the acts of isolated individuals and "do not indicate serious problems" in his nation. "Generally our security is good," he said.
WORLD
May 20, 2009 | Associated Press
Four U.S. contractors for the company formerly known as Blackwater were not authorized to carry weapons when they were involved in a deadly shooting in Afghanistan this month, the U.S. military said Tuesday. The men -- accused of opening fire May 5 on a vehicle in the capital -- have charged that their employer, now called Xe, issued them guns in breach of the company's contract with the military. One Afghan was killed in the shooting, and two others were wounded.
NATIONAL
March 22, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
The suspect in the shooting deaths of at least 16 civilians in southern Afghanistan has been linked to a second incident of drunken violence near his home base in Washington state - a fight at a bowling alley in 2008. The Pierce County prosecutor's office confirmed that Robert Bales, a 38-year-old staff sergeant assigned to a Stryker brigade at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, was questioned by police after a scuffle but no charges were filed. A police report on the incident, obtained by the Associated Press, said a woman at the scene told police that Bales, who had been drinking heavily, grabbed her hand and put it in his crotch, setting off the fight with the man who was accompanying her. “Both of the two men were drinking, basically,” Rebecca Stover, spokeswoman for the prosecutor's office, told the Los Angeles Times.
WORLD
May 20, 2009 | Associated Press
Four U.S. contractors for the company formerly known as Blackwater were not authorized to carry weapons when they were involved in a deadly shooting in Afghanistan this month, the U.S. military said Tuesday. The men -- accused of opening fire May 5 on a vehicle in the capital -- have charged that their employer, now called Xe, issued them guns in breach of the company's contract with the military. One Afghan was killed in the shooting, and two others were wounded.
WORLD
September 7, 2002 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Hamid Karzai said Friday that an assassin who tried to kill him the day before "had links to Al Qaeda," but he vowed that neither the shooting nor a car bombing that killed at least 24 Afghans here would divert his country from its road to recovery. At the same time, Karzai said the two attacks Thursday were the acts of isolated individuals and "do not indicate serious problems" in his nation. "Generally our security is good," he said.
NEWS
March 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
Soviet activist Andrei D. Sakharov has been told that Russian helicopter gunships fired on their own ground troops to prevent their capture by Afghan rebels, his son-in-law said Tuesday night. In the Soviet Union, Lt. Gen. Boris Gromov, who led the last contingent of Soviet troops out of Afghanistan on Feb. 14, said the allegation was "monstrous."
NEWS
February 4, 1989 | From Reuters
A large Soviet military convoy pulled out of Kabul in a snowstorm during the night, leaving only a rear guard Friday in the besieged Afghan capital. Afghan soldiers questioned by reporters said the column of tanks, armored personnel carriers and trucks full of soldiers took three hours to file up the road to the 12,000-foot-high Salang Pass. Soviet sources confirmed that a big convoy had left and said only 1,000 to 1,500 troops remain, mainly guarding the city's airport.
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