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Shootings Bosnia Herzegovina

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August 14, 1992 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
ABC News had decided in mid-July that Sarajevo was too dangerous to send its reporters, and was working with a British free-lance journalist there instead, when the opportunity came up for producer David Kaplan and correspondent Sam Donaldson to travel into the war-ravaged city with the prime minister of Yugoslavia.
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NEWS
February 11, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Croatian gunmen fired on about 200 Muslims visiting a cemetery Monday, killing one person, wounding many others and jeopardizing a key element of the Balkan peace agreement. The attack was one of the worst outbreaks of violence in Bosnia-Herzegovina since the 1995 Dayton accord. The mayor of Muslim east Mostar, Safet Orucevic, was beaten; the city's Islamic leader, Seid Smajkic, sustained a minor gunshot wound. "I heard noise and then shots.
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NEWS
July 14, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A U.S. diplomat was wounded by gunfire from a passing car as she and her husband were driving west of Sarajevo, a NATO spokesman said. Officials would identify the woman only as a foreign service officer who was temporarily assigned to the U.S. Embassy in Sarajevo as an administrator. Her condition was described as not life threatening. Meanwhile, U.S. Commerce Secretary Mickey Kantor and a delegation of U.S.
NEWS
July 14, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A U.S. diplomat was wounded by gunfire from a passing car as she and her husband were driving west of Sarajevo, a NATO spokesman said. Officials would identify the woman only as a foreign service officer who was temporarily assigned to the U.S. Embassy in Sarajevo as an administrator. Her condition was described as not life threatening. Meanwhile, U.S. Commerce Secretary Mickey Kantor and a delegation of U.S.
NEWS
January 6, 1996 | From Associated Press
NATO troops defending a wounded comrade opened fire in a Serbian-held suburb of Sarajevo, trading the first hostile gunfire of their fledgling mission to keep Bosnia's peace. "It was a quick and positive response," NATO spokesman Lt. Col. Mark Rayner said Friday. "They were the first shots fired by IFOR." IFOR is the acronym for the NATO-led Implementation Force. An Italian military engineer, Cpl.
NEWS
February 11, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Croatian gunmen fired on about 200 Muslims visiting a cemetery Monday, killing one person, wounding many others and jeopardizing a key element of the Balkan peace agreement. The attack was one of the worst outbreaks of violence in Bosnia-Herzegovina since the 1995 Dayton accord. The mayor of Muslim east Mostar, Safet Orucevic, was beaten; the city's Islamic leader, Seid Smajkic, sustained a minor gunshot wound. "I heard noise and then shots.
NEWS
August 5, 1992 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A busload of dazed orphans who survived a hellish odyssey from war-ravaged Sarajevo arrived Tuesday in Germany, while back home, mortar shells rained down on the funeral for two youngsters shot to death during the harrowing escape from the Bosnian capital. A fleet of ambulances rushed the 38 children to hospitals and orphanages after a chartered Russian plane brought them from the Croatian city of Split to the eastern German state of Saxony-Anhalt four terrifying days after their journey began.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | From Reuters
Mortar shells and sniper fire killed at least five people in Sarajevo on Thursday and wounded more than 30, including a camerawoman and a correspondent for Cable News Network. Midway through a day that residents had described as quiet by the besieged Bosnian capital's standards, mortar rounds hit a public kitchen and a crowded street in the southwest district of Hrasnica. U.N. sources said five people were killed and about 30 were wounded.
NEWS
January 7, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a significant setback for the Bosnian peace process, tensions between Muslims and Croats flared Saturday when the third police officer in two days was shot while patrolling the former battle lines dividing the southern Bosnian city of Mostar. The Croatian police officer died less than 48 hours after two Muslim police officers were critically wounded. The Croat was believed to have been attacked from the Muslim side of Mostar, and the Muslims from the Croatian side. The U.S.
NEWS
August 14, 1992 | From Associated Press
An ABC-TV producer was killed Thursday when a sniper's bullet struck him on his first day of covering one of the most dangerous journalistic assignments in decades. David Kaplan, 45, died within hours of arriving in the Bosnian capital with an ABC television crew accompanying Milan Panic, an American businessmen who last month became prime minister of Yugoslavia. Kaplan was hit while riding in the back seat of a van taking him on the perilous route from the airport to the headquarters of the U.
NEWS
January 7, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a significant setback for the Bosnian peace process, tensions between Muslims and Croats flared Saturday when the third police officer in two days was shot while patrolling the former battle lines dividing the southern Bosnian city of Mostar. The Croatian police officer died less than 48 hours after two Muslim police officers were critically wounded. The Croat was believed to have been attacked from the Muslim side of Mostar, and the Muslims from the Croatian side. The U.S.
NEWS
January 6, 1996 | From Associated Press
NATO troops defending a wounded comrade opened fire in a Serbian-held suburb of Sarajevo, trading the first hostile gunfire of their fledgling mission to keep Bosnia's peace. "It was a quick and positive response," NATO spokesman Lt. Col. Mark Rayner said Friday. "They were the first shots fired by IFOR." IFOR is the acronym for the NATO-led Implementation Force. An Italian military engineer, Cpl.
NEWS
August 14, 1992 | From Associated Press
An ABC-TV producer was killed Thursday when a sniper's bullet struck him on his first day of covering one of the most dangerous journalistic assignments in decades. David Kaplan, 45, died within hours of arriving in the Bosnian capital with an ABC television crew accompanying Milan Panic, an American businessmen who last month became prime minister of Yugoslavia. Kaplan was hit while riding in the back seat of a van taking him on the perilous route from the airport to the headquarters of the U.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1992 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
ABC News had decided in mid-July that Sarajevo was too dangerous to send its reporters, and was working with a British free-lance journalist there instead, when the opportunity came up for producer David Kaplan and correspondent Sam Donaldson to travel into the war-ravaged city with the prime minister of Yugoslavia.
NEWS
August 5, 1992 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A busload of dazed orphans who survived a hellish odyssey from war-ravaged Sarajevo arrived Tuesday in Germany, while back home, mortar shells rained down on the funeral for two youngsters shot to death during the harrowing escape from the Bosnian capital. A fleet of ambulances rushed the 38 children to hospitals and orphanages after a chartered Russian plane brought them from the Croatian city of Split to the eastern German state of Saxony-Anhalt four terrifying days after their journey began.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | From Reuters
Mortar shells and sniper fire killed at least five people in Sarajevo on Thursday and wounded more than 30, including a camerawoman and a correspondent for Cable News Network. Midway through a day that residents had described as quiet by the besieged Bosnian capital's standards, mortar rounds hit a public kitchen and a crowded street in the southwest district of Hrasnica. U.N. sources said five people were killed and about 30 were wounded.
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