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Shootings Burma

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NEWS
August 8, 1988
Angel's Flight has become Los Angeles' Flight of Fancy (Metro, July 26). I clipped Carol McGraw's fine article and sent it to my mother, thanking her for taking me on Angel's Flight when I was a child. That one ride will live in my memory forever. At this rate, it'll have to. SHERRY BARBER Whittier
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NEWS
September 23, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writers
The Reagan Administration suspended its $12.2-million aid program to Burma on Thursday because of the five-day-old military government's inability to maintain order, the State Department announced. The suspension came as Burma's opposition leaders rebuffed renewed military bids to draw them into cooperating in electoral politics.
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NEWS
August 11, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Killings and arson swept Burma on Wednesday as anti-government protests raged for a third day. Official Radio Rangoon announced that 33 people were killed and 59 were wounded Wednesday in clashes between security forces and demonstrators and that three police officers were beheaded in suburban Rangoon. The official three-day casualty toll is now 78 dead, although estimates by diplomatic sources in the capital are at least double that number.
NEWS
September 21, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Burma's martial-law command Tuesday appointed a Cabinet of military men to run the beleaguered country, still stunned by Sunday's military takeover and the bloody resistance it triggered. No major demonstrations were reported in the streets of Rangoon, where militant protests began just hours after the army took over, but scattered clashes occurred between protesters and army patrols.
NEWS
September 20, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
In a bloody imposition of military rule, more than 150 people were reported killed Monday when Burmese soldiers fired into crowds of angry demonstrators in sporadic clashes across Rangoon and in several provinces. Accounts of the shootings remained confused and casualty reports varied widely. But the military command, which took power Sunday from the government of President Maung Maung, announced that soldiers shot at "violent and unruly mobs" in the Burmese capital.
NEWS
September 23, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writers
The Reagan Administration suspended its $12.2-million aid program to Burma on Thursday because of the five-day-old military government's inability to maintain order, the State Department announced. The suspension came as Burma's opposition leaders rebuffed renewed military bids to draw them into cooperating in electoral politics.
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
The armed forces seized power Sunday in Burma, and soldiers opened fire on defiant students, Buddhist monks and other protesters in downtown Rangoon early today. Witnesses said casualties were heavy. Word of the coup came in a 4 p.m. broadcast over Rangoon Radio. Army Chief of Staff Saw Maung declared in a brief statement: "The defense forces have assumed all power in the state." The army pledged to impose law and order in the rebellious country and then hold promised multi-party elections.
NEWS
September 21, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Burma's martial-law command Tuesday appointed a Cabinet of military men to run the beleaguered country, still stunned by Sunday's military takeover and the bloody resistance it triggered. No major demonstrations were reported in the streets of Rangoon, where militant protests began just hours after the army took over, but scattered clashes occurred between protesters and army patrols.
NEWS
September 20, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
In a bloody imposition of military rule, more than 150 people were reported killed Monday when Burmese soldiers fired into crowds of angry demonstrators in sporadic clashes across Rangoon and in several provinces. Accounts of the shootings remained confused and casualty reports varied widely. But the military command, which took power Sunday from the government of President Maung Maung, announced that soldiers shot at "violent and unruly mobs" in the Burmese capital.
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
The armed forces seized power Sunday in Burma, and soldiers opened fire on defiant students, Buddhist monks and other protesters in downtown Rangoon early today. Witnesses said casualties were heavy. Word of the coup came in a 4 p.m. broadcast over Rangoon Radio. Army Chief of Staff Saw Maung declared in a brief statement: "The defense forces have assumed all power in the state." The army pledged to impose law and order in the rebellious country and then hold promised multi-party elections.
NEWS
August 11, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Killings and arson swept Burma on Wednesday as anti-government protests raged for a third day. Official Radio Rangoon announced that 33 people were killed and 59 were wounded Wednesday in clashes between security forces and demonstrators and that three police officers were beheaded in suburban Rangoon. The official three-day casualty toll is now 78 dead, although estimates by diplomatic sources in the capital are at least double that number.
NEWS
August 8, 1988
Angel's Flight has become Los Angeles' Flight of Fancy (Metro, July 26). I clipped Carol McGraw's fine article and sent it to my mother, thanking her for taking me on Angel's Flight when I was a child. That one ride will live in my memory forever. At this rate, it'll have to. SHERRY BARBER Whittier
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