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NEWS
June 29, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
An Iraqi suspect who shot his way into a United Nations building in Baghdad said he wanted an end to the international embargo against his country. He denied shooting the two people killed during his takeover. Two Food and Agriculture Organization staffers were killed and six people were seriously wounded, said Amir A. Khalil, director of FAO operations in Baghdad. In addition, a U.N. worker was hurt trying to jump from a window, Khalil said.
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NATIONAL
April 22, 2013 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
JOINT BASE LEWIS-McCHORD, Wash. - U.S. Army Sgt. John Russell pleaded guilty Monday to second-degree murder in the fatal shooting of five fellow service members and the attempted murder of another in Iraq in 2009 after the government agreed not to seek the death penalty. Russell, 48, was dispassionate and matter-of-fact as he gave his first public account of his methodical march with an M-16 rifle through the Camp Liberty combat stress center - the only mass killing of Americans by a U.S. serviceman during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
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NEWS
July 1, 1991 | Associated Press
The head of the International Atomic Energy Agency and U.N. officials met Sunday with Iraq's foreign minister to protest a shooting incident involving nuclear inspectors. The delegation left the hour-long meeting with Foreign Minister Ahmed Hussein Khudayer looking grim. Asked whether it was productive, Swedish nuclear expert Johan Molander would say only, "It was a long meeting."
NATIONAL
May 18, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
A soldier accused of gunning down five fellow soldiers at a mental health clinic in Iraq after reportedly being harshly admonished and laughed at by Army psychologists has been ordered to face a court-martial on charges of premeditated murder and could face the death penalty, the Army announced Friday. The recommendation to refer Sgt. John Russell on capital charges overturns the recommendation of the investigating officer who initially heard his case - the chief judge of the Guantanamo Bay war crimes court.
NEWS
August 4, 1992 | Associated Press
A doctor working with an aid group in northern Iraq was shot in the arm and stomach, and shots were fired at a uniformed U.N. guard in Baghdad, U.N. officials said Monday. The uniformed guard, Vanek Stanislav of Czechoslovakia, was not harmed even though the unidentified assailant fired from about three feet away. The United Nations protested the attack to Iraq's Foreign Ministry. U.N.
WORLD
August 9, 2010 | By Liz Sly and Riyadh Mohammed, Los Angeles Times
Weekend bombings and shootings in Iraq left at least 69 people dead from the north to the south, intensifying fears of a possible surge of violence coinciding with the drawdown of U.S troops. West of Baghdad, eight people died Sunday in what police suspect was a suicide bombing near a government office in Ramadi, and three more were killed in a car bombing in Fallouja targeting a police patrol. In the southern city of Basra, health officials raised to 43 the death toll in a triple explosion in a busy marketplace Saturday night, and police confirmed the bloodshed was caused by at least one bomb, which may have triggered the other blasts.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2009 | Robin Abcarian and , Ashley Powers and Josh Meyer
An Army psychiatrist who was about to be deployed to Iraq allegedly armed himself with two guns and opened fire Thursday afternoon on the grounds of Ft. Hood, the country's largest military base, killing 12 people and injuring 31 others. Officials said that soldiers and civilians heroically ripped apart their clothes to make bandages for fallen colleagues, many of whom were waiting at the base's Soldier Readiness Center for medical and dental exams before deployment. The attack sent shock waves through the military establishment and raised questions about base security.
NATIONAL
May 18, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
A soldier accused of gunning down five fellow soldiers at a mental health clinic in Iraq after reportedly being harshly admonished and laughed at by Army psychologists has been ordered to face a court-martial on charges of premeditated murder and could face the death penalty, the Army announced Friday. The recommendation to refer Sgt. John Russell on capital charges overturns the recommendation of the investigating officer who initially heard his case - the chief judge of the Guantanamo Bay war crimes court.
WORLD
May 13, 2009 | Liz Sly
A U.S. soldier who is accused of gunning down five fellow troops at a combat stress clinic in Baghdad had recently had his weapon taken away because of concerns about his behavior, a senior U.S. military official said Tuesday. The military identified the suspect as Sgt. John M. Russell, 44, of Sherman, Texas, a communications specialist with the 54th Engineer Battalion based in Bamberg, Germany.
WORLD
March 14, 2005 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
When Pfc. Chase McCollough went home on leave in November, he brought a movie made by fellow soldiers in Iraq. On his first night back at his parents' house in Texas, he showed the video to his fiancee, family and friends. This is what they saw: a handful of American soldiers filmed through the green haze of night-vision goggles. Radio communication between two soldiers crackles in the background before it's drowned out by a heavy-metal soundtrack.
WORLD
August 9, 2010 | By Liz Sly and Riyadh Mohammed, Los Angeles Times
Weekend bombings and shootings in Iraq left at least 69 people dead from the north to the south, intensifying fears of a possible surge of violence coinciding with the drawdown of U.S troops. West of Baghdad, eight people died Sunday in what police suspect was a suicide bombing near a government office in Ramadi, and three more were killed in a car bombing in Fallouja targeting a police patrol. In the southern city of Basra, health officials raised to 43 the death toll in a triple explosion in a busy marketplace Saturday night, and police confirmed the bloodshed was caused by at least one bomb, which may have triggered the other blasts.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2009 | Robin Abcarian and , Ashley Powers and Josh Meyer
An Army psychiatrist who was about to be deployed to Iraq allegedly armed himself with two guns and opened fire Thursday afternoon on the grounds of Ft. Hood, the country's largest military base, killing 12 people and injuring 31 others. Officials said that soldiers and civilians heroically ripped apart their clothes to make bandages for fallen colleagues, many of whom were waiting at the base's Soldier Readiness Center for medical and dental exams before deployment. The attack sent shock waves through the military establishment and raised questions about base security.
WORLD
May 13, 2009 | Liz Sly
A U.S. soldier who is accused of gunning down five fellow troops at a combat stress clinic in Baghdad had recently had his weapon taken away because of concerns about his behavior, a senior U.S. military official said Tuesday. The military identified the suspect as Sgt. John M. Russell, 44, of Sherman, Texas, a communications specialist with the 54th Engineer Battalion based in Bamberg, Germany.
NATIONAL
October 25, 2007 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
The State Department's diplomatic security chief resigned Wednesday, marking the first departure of a government official with oversight responsibility for the administration's troubled private security contractor program. Richard J. Griffin, the assistant secretary of State for diplomatic security, did not give a reason for his resignation when he met with Deputy Secretary of State John D. Negroponte. State Department spokesmen confirmed the departure, which is effective Nov.
NATIONAL
July 27, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. government can keep secret the names of private security contractors involved in serious shooting incidents in Iraq, a federal judge has ruled, rejecting a Freedom of Information Act request by the Los Angeles Times. U.S. District Judge Florence-Marie Cooper in Los Angeles said Tuesday that she deferred to the judgment of Army officers who said the disclosure could "provide an advantage to insurgents" and aid them in targeting contractors who provide protection at job sites.
WORLD
March 14, 2005 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
When Pfc. Chase McCollough went home on leave in November, he brought a movie made by fellow soldiers in Iraq. On his first night back at his parents' house in Texas, he showed the video to his fiancee, family and friends. This is what they saw: a handful of American soldiers filmed through the green haze of night-vision goggles. Radio communication between two soldiers crackles in the background before it's drowned out by a heavy-metal soundtrack.
NATIONAL
October 25, 2007 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
The State Department's diplomatic security chief resigned Wednesday, marking the first departure of a government official with oversight responsibility for the administration's troubled private security contractor program. Richard J. Griffin, the assistant secretary of State for diplomatic security, did not give a reason for his resignation when he met with Deputy Secretary of State John D. Negroponte. State Department spokesmen confirmed the departure, which is effective Nov.
NATIONAL
July 27, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. government can keep secret the names of private security contractors involved in serious shooting incidents in Iraq, a federal judge has ruled, rejecting a Freedom of Information Act request by the Los Angeles Times. U.S. District Judge Florence-Marie Cooper in Los Angeles said Tuesday that she deferred to the judgment of Army officers who said the disclosure could "provide an advantage to insurgents" and aid them in targeting contractors who provide protection at job sites.
WORLD
March 10, 2005 | From Reuters
Bulgaria is certain that U.S. forces killed one of its soldiers last week in a "friendly fire" accident, mainly because of poor communication, army and Defense Ministry officials said Wednesday. Defense Minister Nikolai Svinarov said spent bullets removed from rifleman Gurdi Gurdev's body armor were of U.S. issue. "They were 7.62x51 Winchester," he said. Results from a U.S. investigation are scheduled to be released Friday in Baghdad.
NEWS
June 29, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
An Iraqi suspect who shot his way into a United Nations building in Baghdad said he wanted an end to the international embargo against his country. He denied shooting the two people killed during his takeover. Two Food and Agriculture Organization staffers were killed and six people were seriously wounded, said Amir A. Khalil, director of FAO operations in Baghdad. In addition, a U.N. worker was hurt trying to jump from a window, Khalil said.
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