Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsShootings Italy
IN THE NEWS

Shootings Italy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 18, 1998 | Associated Press
Gunmen attacked the brother of a reputed crime boss on the steps of a police station here Sunday, triggering a fatal shootout that slightly wounded an American passerby. Luigi Vastarella, 31, whose brother, Raffaele, is believed to head the Vastarella crime clan in Naples, had just come out of the police station. Italian law requires suspects who are free on their own recognizance to periodically sign in at police stations.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
March 3, 2006 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
It has persisted as one of the most mysterious cases of international intrigue in recent times: Who shot the pope? A committee of Italy's Parliament investigating the 1981 attempt to assassinate John Paul II released its conclusion Thursday that "beyond any reasonable doubt" the Soviet Union ordered the attack that seriously wounded the pope as he greeted crowds in St. Peter's Square. The Turkish gunman, Mehmet Ali Agca, was long ago condemned in the shooting and served 19 years in jail.
Advertisement
WORLD
March 3, 2006 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
It has persisted as one of the most mysterious cases of international intrigue in recent times: Who shot the pope? A committee of Italy's Parliament investigating the 1981 attempt to assassinate John Paul II released its conclusion Thursday that "beyond any reasonable doubt" the Soviet Union ordered the attack that seriously wounded the pope as he greeted crowds in St. Peter's Square. The Turkish gunman, Mehmet Ali Agca, was long ago condemned in the shooting and served 19 years in jail.
NEWS
May 18, 1998 | Associated Press
Gunmen attacked the brother of a reputed crime boss on the steps of a police station here Sunday, triggering a fatal shootout that slightly wounded an American passerby. Luigi Vastarella, 31, whose brother, Raffaele, is believed to head the Vastarella crime clan in Naples, had just come out of the police station. Italian law requires suspects who are free on their own recognizance to periodically sign in at police stations.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|