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Shootings Saudi Arabia

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February 6, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Guerrillas opposed to the U.S. role in the Persian Gulf War blew up a car Tuesday outside a company providing security for the U.S. Embassy in Lima, killing three security guards and seriously injuring seven other people, authorities said. In a drive-by attack, the rebels threw at least 22 pounds of dynamite and fired machine-gun bursts at three diplomats' cars parked in front of the company, police said.
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NEWS
February 6, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Guerrillas opposed to the U.S. role in the Persian Gulf War blew up a car Tuesday outside a company providing security for the U.S. Embassy in Lima, killing three security guards and seriously injuring seven other people, authorities said. In a drive-by attack, the rebels threw at least 22 pounds of dynamite and fired machine-gun bursts at three diplomats' cars parked in front of the company, police said.
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NEWS
February 5, 1991 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Battle-shocked Iraqis are moving military field headquarters into schools and mosques and hiding warplanes on residential streets to take advantage of an allied pledge not to bomb civilian targets, a U.S. commander said Monday. The Iraqi tactic is working, said Maj. Gen. Robert B. Johnston, chief of staff for the U.S. Central Command. But he said the allied command in the Persian Gulf War will not change its bombing policy.
NEWS
February 5, 1991 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Battle-shocked Iraqis are moving military field headquarters into schools and mosques and hiding warplanes on residential streets to take advantage of an allied pledge not to bomb civilian targets, a U.S. commander said Monday. The Iraqi tactic is working, said Maj. Gen. Robert B. Johnston, chief of staff for the U.S. Central Command. But he said the allied command in the Persian Gulf War will not change its bombing policy.
NEWS
February 5, 1991 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what U.S. military officials described Monday as a possible terrorist attack, two American soldiers were wounded slightly by flying glass when a gunman fired on a shuttle bus in the port city of Jidda. The attack, hundreds of miles from the battlefront, raised the specter of American or other allied military personnel in the Middle East becoming targets off the battlefield. Mounting tensions in Jordan already have prompted the U.S. State Department to warn Americans there to leave.
NEWS
February 5, 1991 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what U.S. military officials described Monday as a possible terrorist attack, two American soldiers were wounded slightly by flying glass when a gunman fired on a shuttle bus in the port city of Jidda. The attack, hundreds of miles from the battlefront, raised the specter of American or other allied military personnel in the Middle East becoming targets off the battlefield. Mounting tensions in Jordan already have prompted the U.S. State Department to warn Americans there to leave.
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