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Shopping Carts

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2008 | Jennifer Oldham, Times Staff Writer
Ernest Jimenez Jr. pulls alongside an abandoned shopping cart nestled against a palm tree a few feet from a "No Dumping" sign in a quiet neighborhood. "I got one here; it's from Ralphs," he says, hopping out of his pickup truck to lift the metal basket onto the bed, where it joins a red plastic trolley from Office Depot. "They use the ones with green handles." Jimenez knows his shopping carts. And he should.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2001 | KIMI YOSHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Miguel Pineda watches the streets like a hawk, scanning Anaheim's alleys and avenues until he spots his prey: those stray shopping carts that clutter neighborhoods. He starts early in the morning to avoid heavy traffic, and his handy technique for getting a cart onto the back of his flatbed is to pop a wheelie with it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1998 | JULIA SCHEERES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert Hosey grinned with pride Monday as he showed off the spanking new shopping cart he received in exchange for a battered old one. "This one's a Cadillac," the 60-year-old homeless man said as he filled the new cart with his bedroll and crushed aluminum beer cans. "I love it." Hosey received one of the first of 100 carts bought by homeless activists and distributed on downtown's skid row in response to police confiscation of store-owned carts.
FOOD
May 24, 1990 | DAN SHERIDAN, SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE
Video is coming to your supermarket. Shoppers in suburbs of Chicago, Atlanta and Los Angeles already are pushing carts equipped with 6-by-8-inch screens showing store specials, price cuts, product information, ads and entertainment. In the 60,000-square-foot Dominick's supermarket at the Fox Run Square mall in suburban Naperville, for example, you can choose regular, plain-chrome shopping carts or one of 125 video-equipped carts. Take the VideoCart, being tested by Information Resources Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2010 | By Corina Knoll
Tina Cassar spent last week watching rain flood her backyard and overflow from her pool. So when the sun came out Sunday morning, the Los Alamitos resident took her family for brunch and a stroll along Seal Beach. There they encountered a stretch of sand littered with mangled shopping carts, bicycle tires, tennis shoes and thousands of plastic cups and bottles. "It's awful," Cassar, 37, said as she walked along the shore. "It just shows what kind of pollution comes through the river system."
BUSINESS
February 10, 1992 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a small factory in Glendale, two shifts of employees rapidly assemble an enduring symbol of the consumer age. They're making shopping carts, but with a difference. Although the chrome-plated contraptions sport baby seats and nest just like the supermarket variety, these carts weigh only three pounds and are a mere 11 inches high.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1996 | DEBRA CANO
Due to the growing problem of abandoned shopping carts, Councilman Lou Lopez will ask his colleagues tonight to consider a policy that would permit the city to remove shopping carts immediately from streets and public areas. Lopez also will ask the council to allocate money so city employees can remove the carts. "We need to spend our own money and our own manpower to end this problem," Lopez said.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1999 | DARA AKIKO WILLIAMS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
They carry bags of groceries, sure, but shopping carts are far more versatile. They serve as a portable suitcase for transients, a go-cart for children, a laundry hamper for apartment dwellers and a barbecue pit for beachgoers. The humble carts are so popular that grocers spend millions of dollars annually trying to keep wayward carts on their property.
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