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NEWS
April 20, 2008 | Amanda Lee Myers, Associated Press
At a time when tourists visited the Grand Canyon in stagecoaches, they did their souvenir shopping at a tent set up by a man named John George Verkamp. It was 1898, before the Grand Canyon was a national park, before there was a National Park Service and before Arizona was even a state. Not many had the means to visit the mile-deep gorge, so it was mostly just a handful of adventurers, prospectors, the American Indians whose people had lived there for centuries, and the Verkamps. These days, the Grand Canyon has luxury lodges and cute coffee shops.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2009 | Monte Morin
Los Angeles Police Department detectives are asking for the public's help in identifying an armed man who has robbed more than a dozen sandwich and retail shops in South Los Angeles. The man, whom authorities have dubbed the "Left-Handed Eyeglass Bandit," typically walks in the front door of a business, draws a small-caliber revolver with his left hand and demands money from the clerk. Police described the robber as an African American man in his 30s, who is 5 feet 10 and weighs between 160 and 190 pounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2010 | By Corina Knoll
Growing up next door to Chuy Carburetors in Cypress Park meant Christian Martin got his bicycle tires filled up by brotherly mechanics and, when he got older, his car battery jumped for free. Over the years, additional mom-and-pop auto shops cropped up in his neighborhood, just north of where the 110 and 5 freeways intersect, and Martin, 30, says he'd welcome more. "It's convenient, and they're local so they won't try to rob you," he said. "They're just part of the neighborhood."
TRAVEL
February 2, 1986 | JENNIFER MERIN, Merin is a New York City free-lance writer.
Visitors to bustling Mexico City seem to find the Zona Rosa, or Pink Zone, irresistible. This neighborhood, 13 square blocks in the center of the city, boasts the finest hotels and restaurants. And the shopping is superb. The Zona Rosa is an enclave of European influence and sophistication, suggested by its street names--Londres, Hamburgo, Florencia, Genova and others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2012 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times
May was tough for Darlene Williams. Her unemployment benefits ran out. She paid her rent of $1,116 in June out of the $2,000 left in her life savings. In July, her church kept a roof over her head. In August, the Actors Fund did. In September, a friend handed her $1,200. Now it's October. The rent's past due. Williams wobbles on the cliff's edge. You would not know it by her bearing, which is regal - shoulders back, spine straight, head held high - or by her cheerful, put-together look.
IMAGE
November 20, 2011 | By Alice Short, Los Angeles Times
Location: 928 S. Western Ave., Los Angeles. From the 10 Freeway, take the Western Avenue exit and head north. Hours: 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Mon.-Sat.; 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Sun. What you'll find: A quick drive by Koreatown Plaza won't yield a lot of information. It sits like a monolith on Western Boulevard, between 9th and San Marino streets, offering few clues to what's inside. Three floors of shops face inward, with second- and third-floor walkways overlooking a low-key courtyard area on the first floor.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | From Reuters
Goldsmiths and jewelers shut their shops for a second day here Monday to protest increasing robberies. Shop owners held a rally to demand police protection.
FOOD
September 24, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In China, the mid-autumn festival is a time to celebrate family reunions, to exchange mooncakes and drink tea under a glowing harvest moon. But the full moon brings out a secret dark side in some people. Call it recycling. Or call it the Great Mooncake Merry-go-round. "I admit it. I give them away. Who can eat so many mooncakes?" said Lu Yin, 26, an accountant in Shanghai, who confessed that every box of cakes she presented this year was a passed-on gift from someone else.
TRAVEL
September 2, 1990 | FRED HIATT and MARGARET SHAPIRO, WASHINGTON POST
From the train station of the ancient capital of Kyoto, the vista of gritty modernity seems interchangeable with any other ugly Japanese city. The outlandish Kyoto Tower rising into the smog mocks one's expectations of finding the essence of Japanese culture and refinement. Although the guidebooks tell of treasures in a city spared U.S. bombing in World War II, this hardly seems the renowned city of majestic monasteries, elegant inns and secluded moss gardens. And yet, if the tourist goes about things the right way, Kyoto can be everything the guidebooks promise.
TRAVEL
August 15, 1999 | JENNY TRIPP, Jenny Tripp is a screenwriter who lives in Thousand Oaks
"OK, all together now: John-ka-NAK-a-NAK-a, too-ri-ay!" My two kids and I, and 15 or so other rhythm-challenged people, are hauling away at a long, heavy rope, more or less in sync with the sea chantey we're singing, putting our backs into raising a sail that looks--and feels--approximately the size of North America.
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