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NEWS
June 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
Long Island Lighting Co. shareholders have overwhelmingly approved a deal that could make Shoreham the first licensed nuclear power plant in the nation to be abandoned before coming on line. The agreement approved Wednesday by 95% of the shareholders calls for the utility to sell Shoreham for $1 to the Long Island Power Authority, a state agency. In exchange, a tentative rate hike schedule was established under which the company gets 11 increases over 10 years of about 5% each.
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NEWS
June 13, 1992 | From Associated Press
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has approved plans to dismantle the $5.5-billion Shoreham nuclear power plant on Long Island, N.Y., the most expensive nuclear plant never to commercially generate electricity. The decommissioning order, issued late Thursday, was made public Friday. It came a day after the NRC dismissed all appeals in the case of the New York power plant, which has never operated above a 5% testing level. The order opens the way for Shoreham to become the first commercial U.S.
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NEWS
April 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission granted a full-power operating license to the controversial Shoreham nuclear power plant Thursday in a gesture that may ultimately prove to be symbolic. The commission voted 4 to 0 to grant the license, ending years of hearings that produced reams of testimony and cost millions of dollars. It is the first U.S. nuclear plant to be licensed on the basis of a utility-formulated emergency plan, rather than one created by the state and local governments.
NEWS
September 8, 1989
A judge in Troy, N. Y., ruled that the Bush Administration may enter the state court fight against Gov. Mario M. Cuomo's plan to tear down the Shoreham nuclear plant. Supreme Court Justice F. Warren Travers ruled that the federal Department of Energy was an "interested party" through its ownership of the Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island. Cuomo has sought to prevent the $5.
NEWS
September 8, 1989
A judge in Troy, N. Y., ruled that the Bush Administration may enter the state court fight against Gov. Mario M. Cuomo's plan to tear down the Shoreham nuclear plant. Supreme Court Justice F. Warren Travers ruled that the federal Department of Energy was an "interested party" through its ownership of the Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island. Cuomo has sought to prevent the $5.
NEWS
October 14, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
In the first financial default by a major investor-owned electrical utility since the Great Depression, Public Service Co. of New Hampshire, principal owner of the controversial Seabrook nuclear plant, said Tuesday that Seabrook costs will force it to skip more than $37.5 million in interest and principal payments due on $800 million of its bonds starting this week.
NEWS
March 1, 1989
New York Gov. Mario M. Cuomo and the Long Island Lighting Co. signed a tentative agreement to close the $5.4-billion Shoreham nuclear power plant, making it the first completed U.S. nuclear plant shut down before generating electricity for its customers.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | From Associated Press
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has approved plans to dismantle the $5.5-billion Shoreham nuclear power plant on Long Island, N.Y., the most expensive nuclear plant never to commercially generate electricity. The decommissioning order, issued late Thursday, was made public Friday. It came a day after the NRC dismissed all appeals in the case of the New York power plant, which has never operated above a 5% testing level. The order opens the way for Shoreham to become the first commercial U.S.
NEWS
March 4, 1989 | From United Press International
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission took a big step Friday toward licensing New York's Shoreham nuclear power plant despite an agreement between the state and a utility earlier this week to close the embattled facility. In a 4-0 vote, the commission upheld a decision by one of its licensing boards to dismiss state and local officials from NRC adjudicatory proceedings, effectively ending their effort to block an operating license for the Long Island plant.
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | DAVID RISSER, Times Staff Writer
Residents of Shoreham Heights in West Hollywood have asked the City Council to stop a proposed retail and office complex that they say would add traffic to Sunset Boulevard and isolate them in their hillside homes. The city Planning Commission has approved the four-story project, which calls for 75,000 square feet of offices, restaurants and stores. The council is scheduled to consider the residents' appeal on Oct. 5.
NEWS
June 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
Long Island Lighting Co. shareholders have overwhelmingly approved a deal that could make Shoreham the first licensed nuclear power plant in the nation to be abandoned before coming on line. The agreement approved Wednesday by 95% of the shareholders calls for the utility to sell Shoreham for $1 to the Long Island Power Authority, a state agency. In exchange, a tentative rate hike schedule was established under which the company gets 11 increases over 10 years of about 5% each.
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission granted a full-power operating license to the controversial Shoreham nuclear power plant Thursday in a gesture that may ultimately prove to be symbolic. The commission voted 4 to 0 to grant the license, ending years of hearings that produced reams of testimony and cost millions of dollars. It is the first U.S. nuclear plant to be licensed on the basis of a utility-formulated emergency plan, rather than one created by the state and local governments.
NEWS
March 4, 1989 | From United Press International
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission took a big step Friday toward licensing New York's Shoreham nuclear power plant despite an agreement between the state and a utility earlier this week to close the embattled facility. In a 4-0 vote, the commission upheld a decision by one of its licensing boards to dismiss state and local officials from NRC adjudicatory proceedings, effectively ending their effort to block an operating license for the Long Island plant.
NEWS
March 1, 1989
New York Gov. Mario M. Cuomo and the Long Island Lighting Co. signed a tentative agreement to close the $5.4-billion Shoreham nuclear power plant, making it the first completed U.S. nuclear plant shut down before generating electricity for its customers.
NEWS
October 14, 1987 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
In the first financial default by a major investor-owned electrical utility since the Great Depression, Public Service Co. of New Hampshire, principal owner of the controversial Seabrook nuclear plant, said Tuesday that Seabrook costs will force it to skip more than $37.5 million in interest and principal payments due on $800 million of its bonds starting this week.
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | DAVID RISSER, Times Staff Writer
Residents of Shoreham Heights in West Hollywood have asked the City Council to stop a proposed retail and office complex that they say would add traffic to Sunset Boulevard and isolate them in their hillside homes. The city Planning Commission has approved the four-story project, which calls for 75,000 square feet of offices, restaurants and stores. The council is scheduled to consider the residents' appeal on Oct. 5.
BOOKS
November 16, 1986 | Daniel Hirsch, Hirsch, director of the Program on Nuclear Policy at University of California, Santa Cruz, performed, at the request of the oversight subcommittee of the House Interior Committee, an inspection and assessment of the Hanford "N" reactor to determine its potential for a Chernobyl-type incident. and
Can an accident of the severity of Chernobyl happen here? One who emphatically thinks so is journalist Karl Grossman, author of this new book about Long Island Lighting Co. (LILCO) and its management of one of America's most controversial nuclear projects. "If there is to be a disaster like Chernobyl--or worse--in the United States," Grossman writes, "LILCO's Shoreham plant is a prime candidate." Readers wishing to know why may be disappointed, however.
NEWS
February 17, 1985 | United Press International
The Shoreham nuclear power plant was activated Friday for the first time to test equipment and the performance of plant operators, officials said.
BOOKS
November 16, 1986 | Daniel Hirsch, Hirsch, director of the Program on Nuclear Policy at University of California, Santa Cruz, performed, at the request of the oversight subcommittee of the House Interior Committee, an inspection and assessment of the Hanford "N" reactor to determine its potential for a Chernobyl-type incident. and
Can an accident of the severity of Chernobyl happen here? One who emphatically thinks so is journalist Karl Grossman, author of this new book about Long Island Lighting Co. (LILCO) and its management of one of America's most controversial nuclear projects. "If there is to be a disaster like Chernobyl--or worse--in the United States," Grossman writes, "LILCO's Shoreham plant is a prime candidate." Readers wishing to know why may be disappointed, however.
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