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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2008 | Rong-Gong Lin II
San Luis Obispo County sheriff's officials are investigating what they are calling the suspicious deaths of a 7-year-old girl and her 43-year-old mother, both of Hermosa Beach, officials said Saturday. The bodies of Gillian Harrigan and her mother, Marcia, were found Thursday on the rocky shoreline near California 1. Officials did not disclose causes of death. Autopsies are scheduled for Wednesday. The shoreline north of Pico Creek where they were found is not a popular site for beach- goers.
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BUSINESS
April 3, 2014 | By Roger Vincent
One of Long Beach's trophy skyscrapers, Shoreline Square, has been sold for nearly $102 million to a San Diego real estate investment firm. Parallel Capital Partners Inc. bought the 20-story building at 301 E. Ocean Blvd. from Guggenheim Real Estate of New York and Bantry Holdings of San Marino, according to real estate broker Kevin Shannon of CBRE Group Inc., who represented the sellers. The tower was developed in 1988 along with the adjoining 469-room Westin Long Beach Hotel.
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NEWS
March 26, 1986
Lake Isabella could fill and overflow late in the spring, officials warned. Kern River Watermaster Chuck Williams said he expects Lake Isabella to fill to capacity sometime between May 20 and June 10, because of the melting snow in the High Sierra. He said if the lake fills, some excess water may have to be sent over the spillways, which could cause flooding along the shoreline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2013 | By Jason La
Damian Gadal stumbled on hundreds of candles placed inside small paper bags in and around Shoreline Park in Santa Barbara on Dec. 14. The candles started in the park, lined a set of stairs leading to the beach and then traced the coastline, Gadal said. He didn't see any indication of what the candles were for, but he gathers that they were part of an elaborate marriage proposal. Gadal used a Sony Alpha NEX-7. Each week, we're featuring photos of Southern California submitted by readers.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A swimming pool company president was charged with second-degree manslaughter in connection with the drowning of a 6-year-old boy whose arm was trapped by the suction of a powerful drain pump. Shoreline Pools President David Lionetti, 53, of Stamford, was released on $25,000 bond. If convicted, he faces a maximum of 10 years in prison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2001
Re "Beach-Erosion Funds Float Away," April 29: I read in dismay that the president's proposed budget does not include critically needed funds to protect and preserve Orange County's shoreline. Surfside Colony, which is part of the city of Seal Beach and is the starting point for much of the sand between Seal Beach and Newport Beach, suffers from perilous erosion. At the present, some homes in Surfside have less that 15 feet between them and the pounding surf of the Pacific Ocean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Los Angeles County authorities are warning Antelope Valley residents of a planned burn of vegetation around Palmdale Lake from Monday through Thursday. The burn is an attempt to improve the habitat for the tricolored blackbird, which lives in the lake area, according to a news release from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. "The 300-acre lake consists of 80% shoreline containing cattail vegetation where nesting for the blackbird occurs," the Sheriff's Department said.
NEWS
April 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Coast Guard commandant Monday approved Exxon's plan to scrub at least 305 miles of shoreline fouled by America's worst oil spill, but he demanded that the company also target oil-tainted beaches outside Prince William Sound. Adm. Paul Yost also expressed reservations that Exxon's draft plan was too optimistic. The plan, released Monday, calls for Exxon to hire 4,000 people to clean most of the soiled shoreline by the third week in August. The cleanup can be be completed by August if a hot-water cleaning method that can damage beach life is used aggressively, or by mid-September if environmentally safer methods play a larger role, the plan says.
NEWS
April 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
Exxon will hire 4,000 people to scrub 305 miles of shoreline fouled by America's worst oil spill and says the job can be finished by the third week in August, according to a plan obtained Monday. The cleanup can be be completed by August if a "steam-cleaning" method is used aggressively, or by mid-September if environmentally safer methods play a larger role, says the plan obtained by Associated Press. Those projections were disputed by a state environmentalist, who said after reviewing the plan that only about 150 miles could be cleaned before winter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1988
We've been inundated by commercials for Proposition P. Occidental Petroleum proponents have shockingly misrepresented their case, verbally and visually. First, they label their oil drilling project the "Palisades Inland Energy Project," with emphasis on the Inland . To buttress that falsehood, they use every trick in the television bag. They never allow the camera to show the beach, which is right across Pacific Coast Highway from their project. Very skillful. Nor do they, of course, show the ocean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Los Angeles County authorities are warning Antelope Valley residents of a planned burn of vegetation around Palmdale Lake from Monday through Thursday. The burn is an attempt to improve the habitat for the tricolored blackbird, which lives in the lake area, according to a news release from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. "The 300-acre lake consists of 80% shoreline containing cattail vegetation where nesting for the blackbird occurs," the Sheriff's Department said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- A solution is near for eliminating the stink emanating from bird guano on the shore rocks in La Jolla, San Diego Mayor Bob Filner announced Friday night. The offensive smell has bothered tourists, nearby condo dwellers, merchants and restaurant patrons. The droppings began to pile up when rules were imposed banning people from bothering the birds that sit on the rocks. A firm that specializes in cleaning off offensive odors, Northern California-based Blue Eagle, has been hired to survey the site this weekend and then begin applying its "bio-active" products on Tuesday, a process expected to take three weeks.
NEWS
April 2, 2013 | By Jay Jones
Once it was a hostel for stewardesses and pilots , but now Honolulu's newest hotel is positioning itself as an alternative to Oahu 's beachfront, family-filled resorts. The Shoreline Hotel Waikiki is the newest property of boutique hotelier Joie de Vivre , the San Francisco-based company that operates more than 30 fiercely individual hotels, many in California. The Shoreline is its second property off the U.S. mainland, along with the Coconut Waikiki Hotel , about three blocks away.
TRAVEL
July 1, 2012
Contra Costa County pier Point Pinole Pier Overview: The allure is the walk through the grassy parklands of the Point Pinole Regional Shoreline to get to the 1,250-foot concrete pier. The views are not impressive — San Francisco isn't visible from this vantage point — but the solitude makes it special. Background: Beginning in the 1880s, several companies used the spot for manufacturing gunpowder and dynamite. The original pier (its pilings can be seen at the foot of the current pier, which was built in 1977)
TRAVEL
July 1, 2012 | By Christopher Smith
How was that little vacation you took? You remember. It cost you almost nothing, it burned some calories (or, after that ice cream cone, added a few) and briefly immersed you in quintessential California. It was that walk on a pier, those structures that stretch out like a gateway into the Pacific. Perhaps we don't think about them much, but they're part of what has made California California: Piers (or wharfs as they were called in the mid-19th century) once were the primary way of moving food, cargo and travelers on and off sailing vessels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2012 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
The search for debris from the Japanese tsunami - already making landfall in Canada, Alaska and the Pacific Northwest - has begun in earnest in Southern California. Staffers for the environmental group Heal the Bay began systematic surveys Friday of the Los Angeles County coastline, searching for objects that may have been dragged to sea by tsunami waves that devastated Japan more than a year ago. But if the first day of patrolling the kelp-strewn cobblestones of Malaga Cove was any indication, the debris that has drifted across the Pacific to the West Coast - and so far has included a soccer ball, a motorcycle and a 66-foot-long dock - has yet to hit Southern California.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | LORI GRANGE, Times Staff Writer
For the past 27 years or so, Mission Bay Park, a former swampland turned aquatic resort, has been the pride and joy of San Diego's summer attractions. About 14 million visitors each year bask in its 4,600 acres of land and water; about 2,500 boaters now have their skiffs and yachts stationed in its marinas. But Mother Nature has not been impressed. Storms, high tides, powerful waves from winds and boats and the continuous lapping of water against land have significantly eroded the bay's shoreline.
NEWS
June 27, 1985
I read with interest the letter (Southeast/Long Beach sections, June 20) severely criticizing me for resisting certain demands of the lesbian and gay community and those seeking to restrict U.S. Navy activities in Long Beach Harbor. As for the Lesbian and Gay Pride Festival and Parade, I oppose any organization taking over our newest shoreline park during the warm-weather season, charging $5 admission for entrance to a facility that already belongs to the public, and selling alcoholic beverages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2012 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
A spectacular stretch of Northern California coastline that includes ocean-side bluffs, beaches, rolling hills and redwood groves will be permanently protected from development under a landmark deal approved by the state Coastal Commission. Nearly 10 square miles of untouched shoreline, wooded glens, streams and farmland in northern Santa Cruz County, extending several miles inland, will be transferred to the state and federal governments, which will operate it as open space and preserve portions for agriculture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
As a child crossing the English Channel with his family to immigrate to America, Peter M. Douglas was mesmerized by the churning seas and his first sighting of a whale, an experience that he said forged an "intangible, unbreakable, lifelong bond" with the ocean that deepened as he grew up in Southern California. That fondness for the ocean would later lead him to become one of the fiercest and most controversial guardians of the state's 1,100-mile-long coastline who battled to preserve its natural beauty and public access to its beaches.
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