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ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1996
The sixth annual UCLA Extension short fiction film program will be held today at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Samuel Goldwyn Theater, 8949 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills, at 7:30 p.m. The five short films in the showcase are by industry professionals and film school graduates who are enrolled in the yearlong course. Admission is free but reservations are required. Information: (310) 206-4907.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Quinn Emmett is a Los Angeles-based actor and a screenwriter. But he has also, perhaps surprisingly, found himself as the editor and publisher of the Fog Horn , a new digital literary magazine. Publishing four short stories a month, the Fog Horn is available as an app for the iPad or iPhone, and has made a point of showcasing emerging writers - and paying them for their work. “Our name, the Fog Horn,” Emmett writes on the magazine's website, “is drawn from one of [Ray]
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NEWS
April 5, 1988 | ELAINE KENDALL
The Editor's Choice: The Best Short Fiction for 1987 Vol. IV compiled by George E. Murphy Jr. (Bantam/Windstone: $17.95, cloth; $8.95 paper; 228 pages) Short story annuals are the holiday gift baskets of the publishing industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Novelist and screenwriter Pamela Ribon's memoir, "Notes to Boys (and Other Things I Shouldn't Share in Public)" publishes Tuesday. As her book trailer (a cut above your average book trailer) explains, Ribon has gone back to her early writings to tell stories that are amusing and embarrassing. Ribon has always been funny and frank on her blog Pamie.com ; in her new book she goes further, revealing what she wrote to teenage crushes. Be ready for awkward. And some bad teen poetry.
NEWS
July 17, 1986 | PAUL J. ANDERER, Paul Anderer teaches Japanese literature at Columbia University. He is the author of "Other Worlds: Arishima Takeo and the Bounds of Modern Japanese Fiction." and
A Late Chrysanthemum: Twenty-one Stories From the Japanese, translated by Lane Dunlop (North Point Press: $16.50). Japan keeps coming at us in bits and pieces. Toyotas and Trinitrons, Ikebana and Issey Miyake, sushi and shiatsu; and short poems and short fiction appearing in one anthology after another. Westerners know, though grudgingly, that Japanese technology is more than a collection of gadgets.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
If youth only knew, if age only could. . . . Tonight, the youth of the USC's School of Cinema-Television get a chance to strut their celluloid stuff with the first of two tasty programs showcasing the school's advanced student movie makers. It's a mixed but lively bill of fare: three vibrant animated works and five promising short fiction films, shown at 7:30 p.m., at USC's Bovard Auditorium. (The second program, spotlighting the documentary school, will be shown Nov. 7.
BOOKS
February 18, 1990 | Merle Rubin, Rubin is a frequent contributor to Book Review
While most black American novelists have worked in the tradition of social realism, Clarence Major is one of the small number who have pursued more experimental forms. The author of seven novels, eight poetry collections and several nonfiction works, Major was born in 1936, made his literary debut in the 1960s, and by the 1970s and 1980s, was hitting his stride with offbeat novels like "Reflex and Bone Structure" (1975), "My Amputations" (1986) and "Painted Turtle: Woman With Guitar" (1988).
BOOKS
August 21, 1994 | Ellen Krout-Hasegawa, Ellen Krout-Hasegawa writes for the L.A. Weekly
The title story of Benjamin Weissman's short fiction opens with a quote from advice columnist Ann Landers, in which she calls "morbid curiosity . . . one of the less attractive qualities of human nature." Though not essential, a good dose of morbid curiosity might not hurt those hiking through this harrowing collection of short stories, Weissman's first. This work firmly places Weissman alongside colleague Dennis Cooper in the ranks of L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In the preface to "Stories II," which gathers all the short fiction he has published in the past 15 years, 58 stories, T.C. Boyle recalls a reading Stanley Elkin once gave at the Iowa Writers Workshop. "Mr. Elkin," a student asked, "you've written a terrific collection of stories - why don't you write more of them?" Elkin's response? "No money in it. Next question. " The same has not been true of Boyle, who writes novels and short fiction interchangeably. And yet in these 900-plus pages - which include 14 stories that have never appeared in book form - Boyle means to give us more than a collection; rather, it's an edifice intended, not unlike its equally massive predecessor "Stories" (1998)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2010 | Los Angeles Times staff and wires
Belva Plain, who wrote more than 20 bestselling novels during a literary career that spanned several decades, has died. She was 95. Plain died in her sleep Tuesday at her home in New Jersey, said her daughter, Barbara. No cause of death was given. Plain, known for epic novels of family and forgiveness, never owned a computer and wrote in longhand on a yellow pad. She had written short fiction for women's magazines but didn't start writing novels until after she became a grandmother.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Poet Wanda Coleman died Friday after a long illness, her husband said. She was 67. Coleman was a key figure in the literary life of Los Angeles. She, as our book critic David Ulin recently wrote, "helped transform the city's literature. " She was a finalist for the National Book Award for her poetry collection "Mercurochrome" in 2001. Born and raised in Watts, Coleman often wrote of issues of race, class, poverty and disenfranchisement. "Words seem inadequate in expressing the anger and outrage I feel at the persistent racism that permeates every aspect of black American life," she once said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Alice Munro, who won the Nobel Prize in Literature on Thursday, lives a quiet life in a small town in Ontario, Canada. When the Los Angeles Times' Susan Salter Reynolds visited her in 2006, she explained that she was a "weird" teenager. "I was already deep into being a writer. I went to a dance. Nobody danced with me. This bewildered and annoyed me. I never went to a dance again. " Instead of going to dances, Munro honed her craft, publishing more than a dozen books, most collections of short fiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In the preface to "Stories II," which gathers all the short fiction he has published in the past 15 years, 58 stories, T.C. Boyle recalls a reading Stanley Elkin once gave at the Iowa Writers Workshop. "Mr. Elkin," a student asked, "you've written a terrific collection of stories - why don't you write more of them?" Elkin's response? "No money in it. Next question. " The same has not been true of Boyle, who writes novels and short fiction interchangeably. And yet in these 900-plus pages - which include 14 stories that have never appeared in book form - Boyle means to give us more than a collection; rather, it's an edifice intended, not unlike its equally massive predecessor "Stories" (1998)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Joshua S. Raab means to provoke us. His Santa Monica-based journal theNewerYork seeks a new way of engaging with literature; even to call it a journal, he might say, is to miss the point. Visit the website and you'll see what he means. theNewerYork exists as a print annual - pocket-sized, featuring short works by writers such as Steve Almond, Les Plesko and Stephen Jay Schwartz; Book III is just out. But that's just one iteration. There's also the EEEL , or Electronic Encyclopedia of Experimental Literature, a set of virtual broadsides featuring single texts accompanied by art, as well as a monthly print subscription series called thePaperEEEL . “The dream,” Raab explains, “is that when somebody submits a short fiction to theNewerYork then BOOM that story is now in a book, graphically designed on a poster, adapted into a short film, performed at one of our literary carnivals . At some point it becomes the art of storytelling but we will remain literary publishers, in all forms.” Recently, we corresponded, via email, about theNewerYork.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Bryan Buckley is known as "King of the Super Bowl" - he's a prolific commercial director who frequently helms many of the big game's highest-profile spots for companies including Coca-Cola and Best Buy. But this year he'll be at the Oscars, hopefully with some unusual companions. Buckley directed the Oscar-nominated short fiction film "Asad," a coming-of-age fable about a young Somali boy living in a war-torn fishing village. The project originated as Buckley's tribute to Somalis he met at the Kakuma refugee camp in northern Kenya in 2010, when he was filming a documentary for the U.N. High Commission for Refugees.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
For a debut novelist with a quiet literary sensibility to take on the bloated, overexposed milieu of celebrity culture - and to approach it as a head-on dissection - requires a certain bravado. The soul-sucking Hollywood machine is an area well tread by journalists, memoirists, filmmakers and of course novelists, from Nathaniel West and Michael Tolkin to Bruce Wagner, who recently published his seventh Hollywood-rooted novel, "Dead Stars. " Christine Sneed's debut novel, "Little Known Facts," doesn't exactly fulfill the promise of her book's title.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2012 | Lynell George, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Ray Bradbury, the writer whose expansive flights of fantasy and vividly rendered space-scapes have provided the world with one of the most enduring speculative blueprints for the future, has died. He was 91. Bradbury died Tuesday night in Los Angeles, his agent Michael Congdon confirmed. His family said in a statement that he had suffered from a long illness. Author of more than 27 novels and story collections - most famously "The Martian Chronicles," "Fahrenheit 451," "Dandelion Wine" and "Something Wicked This Way Comes" - and more than 600 short stories, Bradbury has frequently been credited with elevating the often-maligned reputation of science fiction.
MAGAZINE
August 13, 1989
Accolades for devoting the July 2 issue to what seems to be the stepchild of literature, short fiction. Why not go one step further and make it a regular feature, or sponsor a short fiction contest? Why not draw from the wealth of talent in California and include some lesser-known or unpublished writers? Believe me, we work cheap. JESSICA MARSHALL Long Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
This week, the National Endowment for the Arts opened the application period for its new round of literature grants . Novelists, time to start polishing up those CVs. The NEA makes grants of $25,000 to individual writers each year. Who can apply alternates between poets one year and writers of prose the next. The 2014 cycle is open to authors of fiction and creative nonfiction. Here's what it takes to be eligible : from Jan. 1, 2006, to Feb. 28, 2013, you have published: At least five different short stories, works of short fiction, excerpts from novels or memoirs, or creative essays (or any combination thereof)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Tenth of December Stories George Saunders Random House: 254 pp., $26 George Saunders is often described as a satirist. That's not inaccurate: How else do we account for, say, the title effort of his first collection, "CivilWarLand in Bad Decline," with its bleakly absurd portrait of a Civil War theme park? And yet to read him exclusively on such terms is to miss the point. Rather, I see Saunders as a humanist. Certainly, that's the operative sensibility of his new book of short fiction, "Tenth of December.
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