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April 22, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Two top West German officials will make a hastily arranged trip to Washington next week to confront the United States with Bonn's call for early superpower talks on reduction of short-range nuclear missiles, it was announced Friday. The visit by Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher and Defense Minister Gerhard Stoltenberg, urgently requested by Bonn this week, is certain to produce new friction between the two key members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization because the United States is adamantly opposed to any sort of new limits on battlefield nuclear weapons.
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NEWS
January 14, 1992 | DAN OBERDORFER, THE WASHINGTON POST
Former Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara said Monday that new Soviet revelations about the 1962 Cuban missile crisis, including the presence of hitherto unknown Soviet short-range atomic weapons in Cuba at the time, indicate that the two nations were much closer to a nuclear conflict than was previously realized. McNamara made the statement after returning to Washington from a four-day closed-door meeting in Havana of former U.S.
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NEWS
March 4, 1988 | DON COOK and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization on Thursday submerged a simmering controversy over modernizing its nuclear weapons and concluded a summit conference that President Reagan said demonstrated the alliance's commitment "to move forward to meet our defense requirements" even as it seeks to improve relations with the Soviet Union.
NEWS
September 28, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush announced Friday night that his Administration will immediately withdraw short-range nuclear weapons from Europe and abandon its support for a mobile intercontinental missile as the first steps of a sweeping plan to curtail the 42-year-old U.S.-Soviet nuclear rivalry.
NEWS
May 23, 1989 | From United Press International
Secretary of State James A. Baker III said today "there is still a gap" between the United States and West Germany over short-range nuclear missiles that may not be resolved in time for the NATO summit. At a White House news conference less than a week before the start of a potentially discordant summit, Baker indicated that discussions were continuing to close the rift, but he would not predict success. "There is still a gap between their position and our position. We're not there yet," Baker said.
NEWS
April 11, 1987 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, Times Staff Writer
Kremlin leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev said Friday that the Soviet Union will not go along with U.S. suggestions that missiles with a range of 600 miles or less be included in the ongoing Geneva talks on intermediate-range nuclear forces. Instead, he restated the Kremlin's readiness to open a parallel set of negotiations designed to reduce and eventually to eliminate short-range nuclear weapons, known in Soviet parlance as operational-tactical weapons.
NEWS
May 1, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Chancellor Helmut Kohl and British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher failed during a three-hour meeting here Sunday to resolve their differences over NATO's deployment of short-range nuclear weapons, a split that has caused a crisis in the Atlantic Alliance. Thatcher went so far as to say that Bonn's approach--if carried through--would be "disastrous for the future of NATO." She said that pulling short-range nuclear weapons--those with a range of less than 300 miles--out of West Germany is "not an acceptable strategy" for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
NEWS
May 31, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
The leaders of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization on Tuesday ended their two-day summit meeting on a triumphant note after endorsing a nuclear arms compromise that healed a serious rift in the alliance. The compromise, worked out after midnight by foreign ministers of NATO's 16-member nations, calls for U.S.-Soviet talks on reducing--but not eliminating--short-range nuclear weapons. It makes such cuts contingent on an agreement in East-West talks under way in Vienna on reducing levels of conventional weapons.
NEWS
March 26, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON and NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writers
Foreign ministers of the Warsaw Pact nations have rejected Washington's proposals to negotiate restraints on shorter-range Soviet missiles as part of a ban on U.S. and Soviet medium-range weapons, a senior Soviet official said Wednesday. Deputy Foreign Minister Vadim P. Loginov told a press briefing that his country and its East Bloc allies unanimously agree that the removal of short-range nuclear weapons from Europe must be kept separate from a medium-range missile deal.
NEWS
May 5, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President Bush declared his willingness Thursday to conduct negotiations with West Germany over the development of new short-range nuclear missiles for Europe, but he insisted that he would balk at any plan that would remove all nuclear weapons from Europe. For the second day in a row, the President received a foreign leader at the White House and found himself in the midst of a discussion of the controversy that threatens to disrupt a NATO summit meeting May 29-30 that has been called to celebrate 40 years of Western unity.
NEWS
June 6, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union will withdraw 1,500 nuclear warheads from Central Europe this year as part of a unilateral slash in short-range forces, Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze announced Tuesday, taking by surprise both Secretary of State James A. Baker III and a Soviet spokesman.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wake of an agreement limiting non-nuclear forces in Europe, an attacking army of Soviet troops would have so far to march and would arrive so thinned-out that the North Atlantic Treaty Organization can safely dispense with most of its short-range nuclear weapons, senior NATO defense officials have concluded.
NEWS
May 31, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
The leaders of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization on Tuesday ended their two-day summit meeting on a triumphant note after endorsing a nuclear arms compromise that healed a serious rift in the alliance. The compromise, worked out after midnight by foreign ministers of NATO's 16-member nations, calls for U.S.-Soviet talks on reducing--but not eliminating--short-range nuclear weapons. It makes such cuts contingent on an agreement in East-West talks under way in Vienna on reducing levels of conventional weapons.
NEWS
May 24, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State James A. Baker III held out little hope Tuesday that the United States and West Germany would resolve their dispute over short-range nuclear missiles before next week's North Atlantic Treaty Organization summit conference, saying that an issue so "extraordinarily important" could not be disposed of hastily. Baker's pessimistic assessment, which he said was echoed by President Bush in an interview Tuesday morning with European journalists, suggested that the attempts to prevent the meeting from being marred by political friction may fail.
NEWS
May 23, 1989 | From United Press International
Secretary of State James A. Baker III said today "there is still a gap" between the United States and West Germany over short-range nuclear missiles that may not be resolved in time for the NATO summit. At a White House news conference less than a week before the start of a potentially discordant summit, Baker indicated that discussions were continuing to close the rift, but he would not predict success. "There is still a gap between their position and our position. We're not there yet," Baker said.
NEWS
May 5, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President Bush declared his willingness Thursday to conduct negotiations with West Germany over the development of new short-range nuclear missiles for Europe, but he insisted that he would balk at any plan that would remove all nuclear weapons from Europe. For the second day in a row, the President received a foreign leader at the White House and found himself in the midst of a discussion of the controversy that threatens to disrupt a NATO summit meeting May 29-30 that has been called to celebrate 40 years of Western unity.
NEWS
May 24, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State James A. Baker III held out little hope Tuesday that the United States and West Germany would resolve their dispute over short-range nuclear missiles before next week's North Atlantic Treaty Organization summit conference, saying that an issue so "extraordinarily important" could not be disposed of hastily. Baker's pessimistic assessment, which he said was echoed by President Bush in an interview Tuesday morning with European journalists, suggested that the attempts to prevent the meeting from being marred by political friction may fail.
NEWS
June 6, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union will withdraw 1,500 nuclear warheads from Central Europe this year as part of a unilateral slash in short-range forces, Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze announced Tuesday, taking by surprise both Secretary of State James A. Baker III and a Soviet spokesman.
NEWS
May 1, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Chancellor Helmut Kohl and British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher failed during a three-hour meeting here Sunday to resolve their differences over NATO's deployment of short-range nuclear weapons, a split that has caused a crisis in the Atlantic Alliance. Thatcher went so far as to say that Bonn's approach--if carried through--would be "disastrous for the future of NATO." She said that pulling short-range nuclear weapons--those with a range of less than 300 miles--out of West Germany is "not an acceptable strategy" for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
NEWS
April 22, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Two top West German officials will make a hastily arranged trip to Washington next week to confront the United States with Bonn's call for early superpower talks on reduction of short-range nuclear missiles, it was announced Friday. The visit by Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher and Defense Minister Gerhard Stoltenberg, urgently requested by Bonn this week, is certain to produce new friction between the two key members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization because the United States is adamantly opposed to any sort of new limits on battlefield nuclear weapons.
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