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October 11, 1991 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tina and Matthew Schafnitz had tried for two years to conceive a child. They had all but given up on the doctors and the fertility drugs. So when Tina found out she was pregnant, she kept it secret for two weeks until Matthew's birthday, when she hired a couple of violin players and broke the news at a special dinner. "We were lifted so high with the pregnancy," she recalls. "We were walking on air. We were on our way to a wonderful place called parenthood."
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NEWS
October 11, 1991 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tina and Matthew Schafnitz had tried for two years to conceive a child. They had all but given up on the doctors and the fertility drugs. So when Tina found out she was pregnant, she kept it secret for two weeks until Matthew's birthday, when she hired a couple of violin players and broke the news at a special dinner. "We were lifted so high with the pregnancy," she recalls. "We were walking on air. We were on our way to a wonderful place called parenthood."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1990
Richard Crandall, a Huntington Beach resident and founder of the Short Stature Foundation, received the Dayle McIntosh Center's "barrier buster" award Friday for his work enlightening the community about short people. The Dayle McIntosh Center for the Disabled honored Crandall and four other people and companies for their work in helping the physically and mentally handicapped to live independently.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1990 | TOM McQUEENEY
The Irvine Multiservice Center's expansion and renovation program is now complete, creating office space for 24 nonprofit organizations in the former City Hall building. Although minor work still needs to be completed in the area that used to house the police department, the old City Hall at Jamboree Road and McGaw Avenue is once again full and providing services to the community, said Libby Cowan, the city's Community Services superintendent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1998 | ERIKA CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Newport Beach socialite and children's advocate was arrested on suspicion of selling illegal drugs, police said Friday. Tina Schafnitz, 37, was arrested in Tustin on March 16 after she allegedly sold more than half an ounce of cocaine worth $1,000 to an undercover police officer, Tustin Police Lt. Mike Shanahan said. Schafnitz was booked into the Orange County Jail. She was released March 17 in lieu of $25,000 bail pending an arraignment, Shanahan said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1998 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
Citing irreconcilable differences, the husband of Newport Beach socialite Tina Schafnitz--now serving a 10-month jail sentence for selling cocaine to an undercover officer--has filed for divorce. Matthew Schafnitz, 55, filed the divorce petition in Orange County Superior Court on April 30, a week after his wife of 15 years pleaded guilty to selling $1,000 worth of cocaine to an undercover Tustin police officer.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | BEVERLY BUSH SMITH, Beverly Bush Smith is a free-lance writer who regularly covers restaurant news for TheTimes Orange County Edition
Where the wild things are: You'll find rattlesnake and caribou and musk ox from the North Pole on the menu in Fullerton at Aurora's fifth annual Festival of the Hunt, scheduled for Sunday, Nov. 3.
NEWS
January 1, 1985 | ANN JAPENGA
It's been slightly more than a year since 17-year-old Michelle Crandall hanged herself in the garage of her mother's Costa Mesa home. Along with the more common upsets of adolescence, Michelle was plagued by the fact that she was a dwarf. She ultimately found it impossible to cope with being different in a society that has tended not to recognize the special needs of short-statured people.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1996 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Country Music Assn. announced its latest round of awards this week--and the Mavericks won group of the year for the second year in a row--the country-music industry finds itself in the midst of a major self-evaluation. Labels are folding and artists are losing contracts because, after several boom years, country record sales have dipped and country radio listenership is down nationally to the tune of 20%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1998 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tina Schafnitz, a Newport Beach socialite charged with selling $1,000 worth of cocaine to an undercover police officer, has voluntarily enrolled in a drug treatment program, her attorney said Monday. Schafnitz made her first appearance in court Monday and pleaded not guilty to drug sale and possession charges at her arraignment in Municipal Court in Santa Ana. "I think her actions indicate that she recognizes there is a problem that needs to be dealt with," attorney Robert Newman said.
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