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Short Stories

NEWS
August 7, 1998 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Move over, tabloids, Alexander Waugh has a scoop: A good short story never goes out of style. Waugh, the grandson of "Scoop" author Evelyn, believes that commuters are tired of the dumbing down of popular culture and, given the chance, will read a classic on the train instead of a newspaper feature about, say, short stories. Waugh is giving them a chance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2001 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as it earns critical praise and awards, the recently released "In the Bedroom" isn't likely to jump-start interest in what, for Hollywood, remains dubious source material: the contemporary American short story. "In the Bedroom" is based on the short story "Killings," by Andre Dubus, from the collection "Finding a Girl in America," published in 1980. The film, in fact, is dedicated to Dubus, who died in 1999 at age 62.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2005 | Kai Maristed, Special to The Times
Steve ALMOND soared into bestsellerdom last year as the ebulliently gifted author of "Candyfreak," a hilarious personal odyssey into the workings of smaller sweets manufacturers around the country. His new, third opus, "The Evil B.B. Chow," declares an enduring commitment to fiction.
BOOKS
February 9, 1986 | Amy Hempel, Hempel is the author of a collection of stories, "Reasons to Live" (Knopf)
"The Best American Short Stories" is one of two annual anthologies that assemble some--and I stress some-- of the best short fiction published in American and Canadian magazines during the preceding year (the other is "Prize Stories/The O. Henry Awards"; a third, "The Editors' Choice: New American Stories, made its debut last year).
NEWS
April 19, 1994 | CHRIS GOODRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the short story "The Products of Love," the narrator attempts to decipher the curious history of a woman named Paula, with whom he has fallen in love despite her marriage to Eugene, also a friend. He queries Paula and Eugene, separately and together, and eventually comes up with enough material to reconstruct her story. "It came out in pieces," the narrator writes, "like a child's elaborate toy. It's taken concentration, and some guesswork, to assemble the parts."
NEWS
March 8, 1991 | ELAINE KENDALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
James Laughlin, founder of New Directions press, has not only published adventurous contemporary fiction but found time himself to produce an impressive body of criticism, short fiction and verse. A tribute to a distinguished man of letters, "Random Stories" collects a dozen quietly powerful short stories written early in his career; it also includes an informal and candid autobiographical essay and an affectionate tribute by Octavio Paz.
NEWS
December 14, 1998 | JONATHAN LEVI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I know when one is dead." The line is King Lear's; the dead one, his youngest daughter Cordelia; the writer, Shakespeare. I have seen many great actors (and even actresses) read that line. And yet the performance I remember best is that of the critic and teacher Richard Sewell in a lecture theater filled with 300 college students. It was the first class of the term. We all knew that Sewell, a gentle man with a bewildered shock of white hair, had just lost his wife over the winter vacation.
BOOKS
May 1, 1988 | Herbert Kretzmer, Kretzmer, for 18 years the drama critic of the London Daily Express and for seven years the TV critic of the London Daily Mail, wrote the lyrics of the Royal Shakespeare Company's musical hit, "Les Miserables." currently running in London and New York, and soon to open in Los Angeles. and
Frederic Raphael went to Cambridge University in the early '50s and never got over it. Three decades, 14 novels, and three volumes of short stories later, Raphael's university days remain, it appears, the dominant shaping influence of his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2007 | Hillel Italie, Associated Press
Amy Hempel, short story writer, is spending a rainy morning at a Madison Avenue diner. She is 56 years old. Her flowing hair is silvery-white. Her speech is clear, but careful. She sometimes edits herself as she talks or advances her thoughts as if placing one foot slowly before the other. For more than 20 years, she has been creating stories, short stories.
NEWS
November 11, 1993 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
The broken marriages and relationships that figure in Elizabeth Tallent's stories are like smashed mirrors. A picture disintegrates. The man and woman--and the children and stepchildren who are part of the broken picture--bleed as they walk barefoot through the shards, but they also catch bright glimpses of themselves and of each other. The shards are mirrors too.
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