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Short Stories

ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2005 | Kai Maristed, Special to The Times
Steve ALMOND soared into bestsellerdom last year as the ebulliently gifted author of "Candyfreak," a hilarious personal odyssey into the workings of smaller sweets manufacturers around the country. His new, third opus, "The Evil B.B. Chow," declares an enduring commitment to fiction.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2012 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Summer Lies Stories Bernhard Schlink Pantheon: 240 pp., $25.95 In the summer, it isn't easy being German. For a few weeks each year, the famously efficient German work routine grinds to a halt. Relaxation is the order of the day. People bound by blood and marriage spend long, listless hours together - whether they like it or not. The characters in Bernhard Schlink's new, revelatory collection of short stories, "Summer Lies," suffer through the forced intimacy of their family vacations.
NEWS
June 2, 1994 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
The bubbles in "Moses Supposes" signal champagne, or someone drowning, or perhaps someone drowning in champagne. Whether it is a divorced couple nuzzling at their broken marriage after a child's trouble brings them together, or a suffering teen-ager neglected by her rich parents, or a man helplessly trying to cope with his aged, destructive parents, the despair is voiced for rueful wit. Ellen Currie, author of "Available Light," wears her rue with a certain sameness.
BOOKS
February 9, 1986 | Amy Hempel, Hempel is the author of a collection of stories, "Reasons to Live" (Knopf)
"The Best American Short Stories" is one of two annual anthologies that assemble some--and I stress some-- of the best short fiction published in American and Canadian magazines during the preceding year (the other is "Prize Stories/The O. Henry Awards"; a third, "The Editors' Choice: New American Stories, made its debut last year).
BOOKS
January 17, 1999 | MARY ROURKE, Mary Rourke is a Times staff writer
The very idea of collecting the best English short stories into their own separate book invites a skeptical wince. What do England's Thomas Hardy or D.H. Lawrence have that can't be found in New England's persistent moralist, Nathaniel Hawthorne, or New York's prosaic exile, Henry James? What difference whether we quench a taste for other-realism with a work by England's J. G. Ballard or Colombia's Gabriel Garcia Marquez?
NEWS
March 8, 1991 | ELAINE KENDALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
James Laughlin, founder of New Directions press, has not only published adventurous contemporary fiction but found time himself to produce an impressive body of criticism, short fiction and verse. A tribute to a distinguished man of letters, "Random Stories" collects a dozen quietly powerful short stories written early in his career; it also includes an informal and candid autobiographical essay and an affectionate tribute by Octavio Paz.
NEWS
December 14, 1998 | JONATHAN LEVI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I know when one is dead." The line is King Lear's; the dead one, his youngest daughter Cordelia; the writer, Shakespeare. I have seen many great actors (and even actresses) read that line. And yet the performance I remember best is that of the critic and teacher Richard Sewell in a lecture theater filled with 300 college students. It was the first class of the term. We all knew that Sewell, a gentle man with a bewildered shock of white hair, had just lost his wife over the winter vacation.
BOOKS
May 1, 1988 | Herbert Kretzmer, Kretzmer, for 18 years the drama critic of the London Daily Express and for seven years the TV critic of the London Daily Mail, wrote the lyrics of the Royal Shakespeare Company's musical hit, "Les Miserables." currently running in London and New York, and soon to open in Los Angeles. and
Frederic Raphael went to Cambridge University in the early '50s and never got over it. Three decades, 14 novels, and three volumes of short stories later, Raphael's university days remain, it appears, the dominant shaping influence of his life.
NEWS
March 30, 1995 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
"Beyond the mountains there are mountains" goes one of the Haitian proverbs that work their tutelary spirit through Edwidge Dantikat's stories. The Creole sayings of that unfortunate island keep it in one particular sense from being utterly bereft. For Haitians to hurl those six laconic words at the harshness that forbids them passage is to acknowledge it and lift it at the same time. Haiti's proverbs, like Chekhov's plays, light up what rises when men and women are borne down.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | ELAINE KENDALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There are two Kit Reeds, the briskly efficient plotter who wrote the taut suspense novel "Gone" under the name of Kit Craig and her alter ego, the pensive author of "Thief of Lives," 15 tales of anguished accommodation to circumstances defying control. One way and another, both the recent thriller and the short stories deal with loss and the various ways we struggle to cope with guilt, despair and the chasms that separate families and friends.
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