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Short Term Memory

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BUSINESS
April 11, 2010 | By Richard Evans
Executives everywhere struggle with the mass of responsibilities, projects, reports and meetings that add up to information overload. The only option, they reason, is to multitask. There is just one problem with that approach, writes Douglas Merrill, former chief information officer at Google Inc.: It doesn't work. With a PhD in psychology and cognitive sciences, Merrill has the credentials to tell us how the brain functions in a stressful business environment and how to organize our thought processes for success.
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SPORTS
March 31, 2014 | By Steve Dilbeck
SAN DIEGO - See, we don't know this Brian Wilson. Never really seen him. The Brian Wilson known in Dodger blue was borderline invincible. It was hardly a full season, but it was nonetheless impressive. In 18 regular-season appearances, he gave up one run. In six postseason appearances, not even that. "This guy's been Superman for us," said catcher A.J. Ellis. Very true, of course. The former Giants closer joined the Dodgers at the end of August last season and was quickly the go-to guy in the eighth.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2000 | JAMES E. FOWLER
Memory is the retention of information. It is closely associated with learning, which experts say is the ability to change behavior through the acquisition of new knowledge. Memory allows us to retain what we've learned. There are different types of memory. * Short-term memory is a temporary retention of information, while long-term memory can be permanent. Memory experts say new information can be converted into long-term memory through attention and repetition, a process called consolidation.
SCIENCE
July 10, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
In the battle of the sexes, a new study places females in the lead -- concluding that they respond better to repeated stress thanks to estrogen. “It's kind of a popular view that males and females respond differently to stress,” said University at Buffalo neuroscientist and study co-author Zhen Yan. “Our study offers the molecular mechanism.” Yan's group found that young female rats stressed out by a week of periodic physical restraint...
SCIENCE
July 10, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
In the battle of the sexes, a new study places females in the lead -- concluding that they respond better to repeated stress thanks to estrogen. “It's kind of a popular view that males and females respond differently to stress,” said University at Buffalo neuroscientist and study co-author Zhen Yan. “Our study offers the molecular mechanism.” Yan's group found that young female rats stressed out by a week of periodic physical restraint...
NEWS
February 16, 1987 | Jack Smith
This season's favorite subject of biological research seems to be the brain, especially memory. And none too soon. My memory in some areas remains unimpaired. I can still remember a few lines of Shakespeare; I can still recite the first four lines of the Prologue to Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. I can still recall most of my vocabulary.
SPORTS
February 24, 2013 | By Helene Elliott
+ The Chicago Blackhawks keep rolling. On Friday they set a record for most consecutive games with a point from the start of the season at 14-0-3 and they extended that Sunday with a 1-0 decision over Columbus. They have sold out 198 consecutive games and fan interest is big enough to warrant televising practices. Said team historian Bob Verdi on the Hawks' website: "The franchise that once would not put home games on the tube, the franchise that refused to air the first period on the radio from the old Stadium, showed Chicago's boys of winter doing drills Friday morning.
SPORTS
March 31, 2014 | By Steve Dilbeck
SAN DIEGO - See, we don't know this Brian Wilson. Never really seen him. The Brian Wilson known in Dodger blue was borderline invincible. It was hardly a full season, but it was nonetheless impressive. In 18 regular-season appearances, he gave up one run. In six postseason appearances, not even that. "This guy's been Superman for us," said catcher A.J. Ellis. Very true, of course. The former Giants closer joined the Dodgers at the end of August last season and was quickly the go-to guy in the eighth.
SCIENCE
September 11, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times
In what could lead to a new group of targets for the treatment of memory loss disorders like Alzheimer's disease, scientists have identified a group of molecules that appear to be required for the transition from a short-term to a long-term memory. The molecules, called nuclear receptors, belong to a class of proteins called transcription factors that play a central role in gene expression. The proteins bind to DNA and help regulate which genes are expressed at a given time. Previous research had suggested that nuclear receptors were somehow involved in memory formation, and the new study confirms that the loss of these proteins prevents long-term memories from forming.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Emotional regulation -- the ability to take negative feelings and recognize, accept and channel them properly -- is an Achilles' heel for many people, but especially for those with anxiety-related disorders, eating disorders and some personality disorders. It can take years of psychotherapy to strengthen one's powers of emotional regulation. Or, says a new study, it might take a few weeks of brain training aimed at strengthening one's short-term memory. It turns out that the brain circuitry involved in emotional regulation  largely overlaps with the network of brain structures that govern short-term (or working)
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Emotional regulation -- the ability to take negative feelings and recognize, accept and channel them properly -- is an Achilles' heel for many people, but especially for those with anxiety-related disorders, eating disorders and some personality disorders. It can take years of psychotherapy to strengthen one's powers of emotional regulation. Or, says a new study, it might take a few weeks of brain training aimed at strengthening one's short-term memory. It turns out that the brain circuitry involved in emotional regulation  largely overlaps with the network of brain structures that govern short-term (or working)
SPORTS
February 24, 2013 | By Helene Elliott
+ The Chicago Blackhawks keep rolling. On Friday they set a record for most consecutive games with a point from the start of the season at 14-0-3 and they extended that Sunday with a 1-0 decision over Columbus. They have sold out 198 consecutive games and fan interest is big enough to warrant televising practices. Said team historian Bob Verdi on the Hawks' website: "The franchise that once would not put home games on the tube, the franchise that refused to air the first period on the radio from the old Stadium, showed Chicago's boys of winter doing drills Friday morning.
SCIENCE
September 11, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times
In what could lead to a new group of targets for the treatment of memory loss disorders like Alzheimer's disease, scientists have identified a group of molecules that appear to be required for the transition from a short-term to a long-term memory. The molecules, called nuclear receptors, belong to a class of proteins called transcription factors that play a central role in gene expression. The proteins bind to DNA and help regulate which genes are expressed at a given time. Previous research had suggested that nuclear receptors were somehow involved in memory formation, and the new study confirms that the loss of these proteins prevents long-term memories from forming.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2010 | By Richard Evans
Executives everywhere struggle with the mass of responsibilities, projects, reports and meetings that add up to information overload. The only option, they reason, is to multitask. There is just one problem with that approach, writes Douglas Merrill, former chief information officer at Google Inc.: It doesn't work. With a PhD in psychology and cognitive sciences, Merrill has the credentials to tell us how the brain functions in a stressful business environment and how to organize our thought processes for success.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2006 | Geoff Boucher
1 If you're rich enough, apparently you can hang with James Bond and the Man of Steel. Name the real-life tycoon who used his connections to get cameo roles in both "Superman Returns" and "Casino Royale." Rupert Murdoch Donald Trump Richard Branson David Geffen ** 2 The Disney Channel show "Hannah Montana" may be kid stuff, but its soundtrack hit No. 1 on the U.S. pop charts this year.
SPORTS
September 3, 2004 | Lonnie White, Times Staff Writer
There's a bad case of selective amnesia going around Westwood, and you can thank UCLA football Coach Karl Dorrell for it. Everything is about the present. Last season's 6-7 finish, which included five consecutive losses, could have happened decades ago, as far as Dorrell is concerned. And guess what: The Bruins are all suffering from the forgetfulness bug. "We're not thinking about last year," said senior Craig Bragg, who needs 23 receptions and 659 yards to become the school's top receiver.
NEWS
November 20, 1996 | From Associated Press
Cigarette smoking sharpens short-term learning and memory among young people, but the slight improvement comes at a high risk of heart disease, cancer and a shortened life span, researchers say. The finding's real value may lie in providing clues about how to treat nicotine addiction, the researchers said Tuesday.
SPORTS
May 9, 1999 | MARK HEISLER
Gee, already? Talk about a great season. OK, there was that lockout and the schedule was hard on players and coaches, but no one else seemed to mind a truncated, squashed campaign. Actually, we'd like more of them. NBC's ratings for the start of the post-Michael Jordan era actually went up, the playoffs came that much more quickly, so how bad was that? The league seems to have recovered nicely. Take my brother-in-law, Chuck, from Philadelphia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2000 | JAMES E. FOWLER
Memory is the retention of information. It is closely associated with learning, which experts say is the ability to change behavior through the acquisition of new knowledge. Memory allows us to retain what we've learned. There are different types of memory. * Short-term memory is a temporary retention of information, while long-term memory can be permanent. Memory experts say new information can be converted into long-term memory through attention and repetition, a process called consolidation.
SPORTS
May 9, 1999 | MARK HEISLER
Gee, already? Talk about a great season. OK, there was that lockout and the schedule was hard on players and coaches, but no one else seemed to mind a truncated, squashed campaign. Actually, we'd like more of them. NBC's ratings for the start of the post-Michael Jordan era actually went up, the playoffs came that much more quickly, so how bad was that? The league seems to have recovered nicely. Take my brother-in-law, Chuck, from Philadelphia.
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