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SPORTS
April 21, 2014 | By Steve Dilbeck
Turns out the Dodgers have found a nifty solution to a worn-down bullpen. More relievers! Before Monday's game against the Philadelphia Phillies, the Dodgers optioned utilityman Chone Figgins to triple-A Albuquerque and called up right-handed reliever Jose Dominguez. Despite the Dodgers' 12-7 record, their bullpen has thrown 70 1/3 innings this season, second only to the Arizona Diamondbacks' bullpen. “It's been a little bit of a storm,” said Dodgers Manager Don Mattingly.
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SPORTS
April 21, 2014 | By Steve Dilbeck
Turns out the Dodgers have found a nifty solution to a worn-down bullpen. More relievers! Before Monday's game against the Philadelphia Phillies, the Dodgers optioned utilityman Chone Figgins to triple-A Albuquerque and called up right-handed reliever Jose Dominguez. Despite the Dodgers' 12-7 record, their bullpen has thrown 70 1/3 innings this season, second only to the Arizona Diamondbacks' bullpen. “It's been a little bit of a storm,” said Dodgers Manager Don Mattingly.
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BUSINESS
November 26, 2010 | Bloomberg
A shortage of coffee may become "acute" because stock levels are low and disease, weather and blocked roads in Colombia are curbing supply, Macquarie Group Ltd. said in a report distributed today. "As we go into the 2011 season with historically low world stock levels, and with Brazil entering its lower yielding year of its biennial cycle, we fear that the global coffee supply shortfall will become very acute indeed," the bank said in the report.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
In balmy Southern California this week, the polar vortex is putting a chill on Simon Baitler's Passover meals. On Monday night, 21 people dined at his Santa Monica house to celebrate the Jewish holiday. Another 10 were scheduled to be there Tuesday evening. To feed them all, Baitler had to get creative because a winter of historically frigid proportions has caused a shortage of whitefish, a key ingredient in the Seder feast's traditional gefilte fish. Most of the country gets its whitefish from the Great Lakes, which this winter were so thickly caked in ice that they are just now starting to thaw.
SCIENCE
August 9, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
The abrupt shutdown of two aging nuclear reactors that produce a radioisotope widely used in medical imaging has forced physicians in the U.S. and abroad into a crisis, requiring them to postpone or cancel necessary scans for heart disease and cancer, or turn to alternative tests that are not as accurate, take longer and expose patients to higher doses of radiation. Because of limits on testing produced by the shortage, some patients will undergo heart or cancer surgeries that could have been prevented by imaging, and others will miss needed surgeries because of the lack of testing, said Dr. Michael Graham of the University of Iowa, president of SNM, formerly the Society of Nuclear Medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1988
Since we have another shortage of water, many suggestions will be forthcoming about how to save water. Los Angeles has already made some which mostly are rather puny compared with the magnitude of the problem. Substantial savings could be made if automatic sprinklers did not operate when irrigation is not needed; that is the case during a good part of the rainy season. Since the average rainfall is about 15 inches per year, the automatic sprinklers based on the clock do not allow for the input of rain.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Our national nightmare is over. Fears of an ongoing shortage of peanuts and hence peanut butter (which, if it isn't a food group, should be) have been alleviated by a record peanut crop. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the 2012 peanut harvest should hit 6.1 billion pounds, topping the 2008 record of almost 5.2 billion pounds. The increase has cut peanut prices by more than half since the spring, prompting makers of peanut butter to say retail prices should come down in coming months.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2014 | By Shan Li
The vast majority of Californians believe, unsurprisingly, that the state is in the throes of a serious water crisis. But many disagree about what can be done about it. About 54% of Golden State voters believe farmers could cut down on their water with no real hardship by changing crops and being more efficient, according to the latest Field Poll. Separately, two-thirds said they support voluntary water rationing, while only 27% favored mandatory cuts in water use. Opinions also were divided when people assigned blame for the drought.
NEWS
December 5, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Good news for aging baby boomers: Fears of a nursing shortage may be turning around. Between 1979 and 1991, the number of young nurses declined nearly 50%. It continued to drop for another decade, hitting a low of 102,000 in 2002.  Looking at the numbers, analysts worried that as older nurses retired, there wouldn't be anyone to replace them, leading to a shortfall.    But when economists David I. Auerbach of Rand Health, Peter I. Buerhaus of...
NEWS
September 25, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
BACON AND PORK SHORTAGE "NOW UNAVOIDABLE" A British trade group is predicting a pork and bacon shortage next year , blamed on the drought conditions that hurt the corn and soybean crops this year. [Los Angeles Times] MARKETING TO KIDS: SO HOW IS THE FOOD INDUSTRY DOING? The FTC is revising a 2008 report that looked at how food companies market products to children, expected to be released by the end of 2012 . [ABC News] NO MORE JUNK FOOD AT THE HOSPITAL...
BUSINESS
April 16, 2014 | By Shan Li
The vast majority of Californians believe, unsurprisingly, that the state is in the throes of a serious water crisis. But many disagree about what can be done about it. About 54% of Golden State voters believe farmers could cut down on their water with no real hardship by changing crops and being more efficient, according to the latest Field Poll. Separately, two-thirds said they support voluntary water rationing, while only 27% favored mandatory cuts in water use. Opinions also were divided when people assigned blame for the drought.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Frank Shyong
The news that Irwindale has declared Sriracha hot sauce a public nuisance has set the Internet aflame, but a shortage is unlikely. Irwindale is expected to adopt a resolution labeling the smell of Sriracha production a public nuisance and declaring the company in violation of its development agreement. The resolution is expected to give Huy Fong Foods 90 days to fix the problem, according to city officials. But the company says it can fix the smell problem by June 1, which is well before that deadline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes and Tim Logan
Dozens of people shared only three showers in the building that Patricia McDowell called home for the last 2 1/2 years. Roaches skittered across the floor, she said, and lights went out and stayed out. In recent months, McDowell said she had to run an extension cord to another room to keep electricity going. But when the Los Angeles Fire Department told McDowell and dozens of other tenants that they had to clear out of the building at 5700 S. Hoover St., citing dangerous conditions, she panicked.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
Gillian Anderson did the unthinkable when she achieved pop culture fame as skeptical FBI agent Dana Scully in the landmark "The X-Files. " When the series ended in 2002 after nine seasons, she walked away from American television, moved to London and began taking on a variety of smaller-scale theater and film projects. Now, a year after the 20th anniversary of the start of "The X-Files," Anderson is more visible than ever in three TV series. She stars in BBC Two's "The Fall" as a senior police detective investigating serial murders, and NBC's "Crisis," in which she plays the chief executive of an international IT conglomerate whose daughter is kidnapped.
WORLD
April 1, 2014 | By Mery Mogollon and Chris Kraul
CARACAS, Venezuela -- Grappling with scarcities of sugar, milk, cornmeal and other basic foods, the Venezuelan government Tuesday unveiled a new electronic identification system for shoppers that critics say is a modern version of a ration card. President Nicolas Maduro described it as a means of “safeguarding food sovereignty.” The system will employ electronic fingerprint IDs similar to those used to identify Venezuelan voters to register shoppers who purchase goods at the state-run grocery chains Mercal, Bicentenario and PDVAL.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien and Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - It's becoming a familiar scene in everybody's favorite city - luxury shuttles with Wi-Fi and plush seats barreling past sluggish, dilapidated city buses crammed with local residents standing elbow to elbow. The nerd convoy, ferrying workers to technology companies in Silicon Valley, has raised the ire of civic activists who see it as a symbol of a divide between the haves and have nots as the region's tech boom has sent housing costs and evictions soaring. But as heated as that backlash has become at times, it has obscured a much broader story that these buses have to tell about changes sweeping across not just San Francisco but also the entire Bay Area.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
Hundreds of airline pilots are set to retire soon and new federal rules require existing pilots to get more rest between flights. Does that signal a pilot shortage for the airline industry? It depends on who you talk to. The impact of a pilot shortage would hit travelers hard, as airlines would have to cancel flights and raise fares for those remaining flights that are fully staffed. Airline executives have recently blamed a pilot shortage for cuts to air service. Bryan Bedford, chief executive of Republic Airways Holdings Inc., said last month that the regional carrier would be removing 27 of its 243 aircraft from service because of a lack of qualified pilots.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Hundreds of airline pilots are set to retire soon and new federal rules require existing pilots to get more rest between flights. Does that signal a pilot shortage for the airline industry? It depends on who you talk to. The effect of a pilot shortage would hit travelers hard, as airlines would have to cancel flights and raise fares for those remaining flights that are fully staffed. Airline executives have recently blamed a pilot shortage for cuts to air service. Bryan Bedford, chief executive of Republic Airways Holdings Inc., said last month that the regional carrier would be removing 27 of its 243 aircraft from service because of a lack of qualified pilots.
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