Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsShortstop Program
IN THE NEWS

Shortstop Program

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF
Shortstop, an Orange County program that aims to dissuade juveniles from a life of crime, is the subject of a 30-minute program hosted by newsman Jim Cooper to be shown on KOCE-TV Channel 50 tonight and again on Friday. In Shortstop, first-time offenders are put in a "lockup" at Orange County Superior Courthouse where they hear some tough talk from adult inmates about the realities of prison life.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1997
As one of the Orange County organizations alluded to in your Dec. 26 editorial, "Getting Tough Isn't the Only Answer to Juvenile Crime," the Orange County Bar Foundation strongly supports your view that programs targeting juvenile crime prevention should be adopted statewide and should be assured a reliable source of funds. The foundation's nationally acclaimed Shortstop Program, its Hispanic counterpart Programa Shortstop, and our Peer Court and gang violence suppression programs focus on early intervention so that juveniles at risk or who have committed a first violation receive education, counseling and encouragement to get back on track.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1990 | JIM NEWTON
After a week of behind-the-scenes negotiations, aides to several county supervisors said Monday that a deal appears near to give a highly touted program for juvenile delinquents the money it needs to expand. Backers of the Shortstop Program had appealed a county advisory group's decision not to include the program in a grant proposal for next year. The program had asked for money to add a Spanish-language operation to its existing English-language service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1996 | MIMI KO CRUZ
About 200 county teenagers gathered here Tuesday for "Oye! We Are the Future," a youth rally where they heard motivational speeches urging them to stay strong in the face of such adversity as crime, drugs and family problems. "This is great," said Kara Boonsirisermsook, 17, of Santa Ana. "I've never been to anything like this before and I'm learning a lot."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1997
As one of the Orange County organizations alluded to in your Dec. 26 editorial, "Getting Tough Isn't the Only Answer to Juvenile Crime," the Orange County Bar Foundation strongly supports your view that programs targeting juvenile crime prevention should be adopted statewide and should be assured a reliable source of funds. The foundation's nationally acclaimed Shortstop Program, its Hispanic counterpart Programa Shortstop, and our Peer Court and gang violence suppression programs focus on early intervention so that juveniles at risk or who have committed a first violation receive education, counseling and encouragement to get back on track.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1996 | MIMI KO CRUZ
About 200 county teenagers gathered here Tuesday for "Oye! We Are the Future," a youth rally where they heard motivational speeches urging them to stay strong in the face of such adversity as crime, drugs and family problems. "This is great," said Kara Boonsirisermsook, 17, of Santa Ana. "I've never been to anything like this before and I'm learning a lot."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1992 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were fresh-faced, scared-looking youths. They didn't know what to expect as they sat in a dark corner of a holding cell normally used for adult felons. They have no names, no identities. To the adults looming over them, the 13 bewildered youths were just numbers. They had committed small-time crimes and they were here to pay for it. "I see a lot of kids like you going in and out of the system," one of the adults told them in a clipped voice. "When you're in the system, you're nothing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1990 | JIM NEWTON
A county advisory group has recommended that more than $5 million in state money be used to support 21 programs for preventing crime and for counseling juvenile offenders, according to a draft copy of its final report obtained Monday. The report, prepared by the County Justice System Advisory Group, endorses 21 programs for available state funds, ranging from probation services to youth shelters, from drug prevention agencies to foster home programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1990 | JIM NEWTON
Advocates of a highly touted program for juvenile offenders warned the County Board of Supervisors Wednesday that an advisory panel's refusal to fund the project could prevent it from being extended to more Latino youths. "We've exceeded all of our expectations with this program," said Kathy Bonner, program director of Shortstop, a juvenile diversion program that has won high marks from area judges and lawmakers. "Now we need the county's help."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1985 | JAMES S. GRANELLI \f7
A high school senior in Costa Mesa won the $500 top award Friday in the third annual Law Day writing contest for a story about his first awareness that other countries do not guarantee the same freedoms as the United States. Greg Palme of Estancia High School wrote about how police in Rosarito Beach, Mexico, handcuffed and jailed a group of students who were seeking aid for an injured friend during a March, 1982, camping trip.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1992 | RICK VANDERKNYFF
Shortstop, an Orange County program that aims to dissuade juveniles from a life of crime, is the subject of a 30-minute program hosted by newsman Jim Cooper to be shown on KOCE-TV Channel 50 tonight and again on Friday. In Shortstop, first-time offenders are put in a "lockup" at Orange County Superior Courthouse where they hear some tough talk from adult inmates about the realities of prison life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1992 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were fresh-faced, scared-looking youths. They didn't know what to expect as they sat in a dark corner of a holding cell normally used for adult felons. They have no names, no identities. To the adults looming over them, the 13 bewildered youths were just numbers. They had committed small-time crimes and they were here to pay for it. "I see a lot of kids like you going in and out of the system," one of the adults told them in a clipped voice. "When you're in the system, you're nothing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1990 | JIM NEWTON
After a week of behind-the-scenes negotiations, aides to several county supervisors said Monday that a deal appears near to give a highly touted program for juvenile delinquents the money it needs to expand. Backers of the Shortstop Program had appealed a county advisory group's decision not to include the program in a grant proposal for next year. The program had asked for money to add a Spanish-language operation to its existing English-language service.
NEWS
June 3, 1994
For many first-time offenders, help comes in the form of Shortstop, an Orange County program for youths 10 through 17 that allows them to participate in a rehabilitation program rather than going through the juvenile justice system. The goal of Shortstop and its Spanish-language counterpart, Programa Shortstop, is to turn around petty juvenile criminals before they turn to hard-core crimes. The program consists of two three-hour classes, which youths must attend with a parent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1993 | BOB ELSTON
Ceramic tiles painted by youths were unveiled Friday in Juvenile Court by officials of the Shortstop program and its Spanish-language companion Programa Shortstop . The tiles were painted last summer as a part of an anti-graffiti day to show children that graffiti is wrong but artistic expression is OK. The tile collages will be installed in Juvenile Hall, where other youngsters can see them.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|