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Shorty Rogers

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NEWS
November 9, 1994
Shorty Rogers, a trumpeter, composer and arranger who was one of the leading figures in the West Coast jazz scene of the early 1950s, died on Monday in Los Angeles. He was 70. Born Milton M. Rajonsky in Great Barrington, Mass., Rogers performed with the Woody Herman band in the late 1940s, and in 1950-51 he composed several important works for the Stan Kenton band.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2009 | Jon Thurber
Bud Shank, the alto saxophonist who was a key figure in the West Coast jazz scene of the 1950s, has died. He was 82. Shank died Thursday night at his home in Tucson of pulmonary failure, friends said. A versatile musician with an adventurous nature, Shank also played flute and -- during a productive period of studio work -- had pivotal solos on the popular 1960s pop tunes "California Dreamin' " by the Mamas and the Papas and "Windy" by the Association.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1990 | BILL KOHLHAASE
You remember Shorty Rogers. He's the hipster from the '50s with the well-trimmed beard; the leader of Shorty Rogers and His Giants, former Kenton trumpeter-composer and member of Howard Rumsey's Lighthouse All-Stars who had a hand in composing the music for such movies as "The Wild One" and "The Man With the Golden Arm." His reserved, intellectual style of playing and composing helped shape the West Coast sound of the '50s.
WORLD
April 6, 2009 | Sebastian Rotella
Bump Picasso. Forget Rococo. The Quai Branly Museum, a steel-and-glass palace on the Seine River, has news for the culture world: "Three Little Bops" is art. The Looney Tunes cartoon from 1957 retells the Three Little Pigs as a jazz fable with music by trumpeter Shorty Rogers, a luminary of the West Coast school. The Big Bad Wolf is a lousy trumpeter trying to sit in with a swinging trio of pigs. He gets the bum's rush, blows down two clubs and ends up in hell after a mishap with TNT.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
Shorty Rogers, one of the most recorded jazzmen of a generation ago, has been making a comeback in recent years. Friday, he brought a big band to Donte's; Tuesday, he led a quintet in the first of a series of live broadcasts on KKGO that will emanate weekly from the Biltmore Hotel, hosted by Chuck Niles. You could say the only thing missing Friday was Howard Rumsey on bass. Many of Rogers' and Rumsey's colleagues from the Lighthouse years were on hand: Bob Cooper, Bob Enevoldsen and Pete Jolly.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shorty Rogers remembers the exact day he joined the Stan Kenton Orchestra: Jan. 2, 1950. "It was at the time when Stan first put together the Innovations orchestra," the 69-year-old trumpeter-fluegelhornist said recently from his home in Marina del Rey, "the group with strings and French horns. It was as if this wonderful blank canvas had just been handed to me."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1991 | BILL KOHLHAASE
* * *1/2 DAVE MURDY "That Goes to Show Ya!" Time Is Records Under guitarist Murdy's leadership, this is a hard-swinging session by a group of all-Orange-County-based musicians. Murdy's drive and narrative sense owes to no single influence. Rather, it derives from a balanced cross-section of guitarists including Wes Montgomery, Joe Pass and even John Scofield.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1992 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Southern California emerged as a cool spot on the American jazz scene during the 1940s and 1950s, and Shorty Rogers was at the nexus of the movement that eventually became known as West Coast Jazz. Rogers and his cohorts--melodic, sensuous players such as Stan Getz and Lee Konitz--came to Los Angeles from the East Coast to forge a fresh, easy sound that captured some of the optimism and warmth of their sunny new home.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1992 | ZAN STEWART
*** Charles Fambrough, "The Proper Angle," CTI. The former Art Blakey-McCoy Tyner bassist fronts a heavyweight ensemble in a dandy program that ranges from not-too-sweet bossa novas and all-stops-out burners. Fambrough lets his cohorts--Wynton and Branford Marsalis, Kenny Kirkland and Joe Ford--steal the show. Trumpeter Wynton Marsalis delivers effective, even moving solos and, on three cuts, is reunited with his brother for the first time on record in years.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
Nostalgia is what it used to be. Friday's tribute to Shorty Rogers, produced and emceed by Ken Poston for KLON-FM and presented at the Hermosa Civic Theater, was sold out weeks in advance and drew a crowd liberally sprinkled with fans for whom the trumpeter-composer symbolizes an era in West Coast jazz. Rogers himself did not take part, except to join briefly with Terry Gibbs and Chubby Jackson in the scat vocal on "Lemon Drop" and to receive a salutation from Councilman Michael Woo.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1999
I suggest that a "defining moment" ("Life Outside the Lines," Oct. 3) should be revolutionary and not evolutionary, and should have an influence through the end of the millennium. Here are a few suggestions: Art: The work of Piet Mondrian, which demonstrated that art didn't have to be about anything. Abstraction was stuck at the Cubists until Mondrian exhibited totally abstract work. Jazz: Dave Brubeck's album "Take 5" freed composers from the classical time signatures and introduced 5/4 and 9/8. TV: I yield to those who nominate "All in the Family."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1999 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Though it took place a long time ago in a galaxy very, very near, the West Coast jazz movement of the 1950s bred fans every bit as rabid as those "Star Wars" worshipers who camped out to see the latest installment. Judging from the comments heard Thursday at the Hyatt Newporter during the first full day of Jazz West Coast II, a four-day event, some of the nearly 400 attendees, just like the movie buffs, had skipped work to get there at 11 a.m. for the very first notes of the opening concert.
NEWS
November 9, 1994
Shorty Rogers, a trumpeter, composer and arranger who was one of the leading figures in the West Coast jazz scene of the early 1950s, died on Monday in Los Angeles. He was 70. Born Milton M. Rajonsky in Great Barrington, Mass., Rogers performed with the Woody Herman band in the late 1940s, and in 1950-51 he composed several important works for the Stan Kenton band.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shorty Rogers remembers the exact day he joined the Stan Kenton Orchestra: Jan. 2, 1950. "It was at the time when Stan first put together the Innovations orchestra," the 69-year-old trumpeter-fluegelhornist said recently from his home in Marina del Rey, "the group with strings and French horns. It was as if this wonderful blank canvas had just been handed to me."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Giants" is a term Shorty Rogers doesn't take lightly. The name, which he's given to various ensembles he's led since the '50s, was particularly apt for the group he brought into the Cafe Lido on Sunday. The sextet--tall tenor man Bob Cooper, saxophonist Bill Perkins, pianist Lou Levy, drummer Larance Marable and bassist Eric von Essen--made a big impression during a program of Rogers' arrangements and originals.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the early '50s, a small club on a pier in Hermosa Beach was the center of a musical scene that gave birth to the sound that came to be called West Coast Jazz. The West Coast sound, variously described as cool, sophisticated and soft but also known for its harmonic strength and often eclectic orchestration, was championed by various groups that assembled at the surf-side nightspot from which they took their name, the Lighthouse All Stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the early '50s, a small club on a pier in Hermosa Beach was the center of a musical scene that gave birth to the sound that came to be called West Coast Jazz. The West Coast sound, variously described as cool, sophisticated and soft but also known for its harmonic strength and often eclectic orchestration, was championed by various groups that assembled at the surf-side nightspot from which they took their name, the Lighthouse All Stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1999
I suggest that a "defining moment" ("Life Outside the Lines," Oct. 3) should be revolutionary and not evolutionary, and should have an influence through the end of the millennium. Here are a few suggestions: Art: The work of Piet Mondrian, which demonstrated that art didn't have to be about anything. Abstraction was stuck at the Cubists until Mondrian exhibited totally abstract work. Jazz: Dave Brubeck's album "Take 5" freed composers from the classical time signatures and introduced 5/4 and 9/8. TV: I yield to those who nominate "All in the Family."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1992 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Southern California emerged as a cool spot on the American jazz scene during the 1940s and 1950s, and Shorty Rogers was at the nexus of the movement that eventually became known as West Coast Jazz. Rogers and his cohorts--melodic, sensuous players such as Stan Getz and Lee Konitz--came to Los Angeles from the East Coast to forge a fresh, easy sound that captured some of the optimism and warmth of their sunny new home.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1992 | ZAN STEWART
*** Charles Fambrough, "The Proper Angle," CTI. The former Art Blakey-McCoy Tyner bassist fronts a heavyweight ensemble in a dandy program that ranges from not-too-sweet bossa novas and all-stops-out burners. Fambrough lets his cohorts--Wynton and Branford Marsalis, Kenny Kirkland and Joe Ford--steal the show. Trumpeter Wynton Marsalis delivers effective, even moving solos and, on three cuts, is reunited with his brother for the first time on record in years.
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