Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsShoshana Johnson
IN THE NEWS

Shoshana Johnson

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
February 14, 2004 | From Associated Press
Nearly a year after being shot and taken prisoner in Iraq, former Army specialist Shoshana Johnson said the 22 days she spent in captivity do not make her a hero. "I'm a survivor, not a hero," Johnson told Essence magazine in its March issue. "The heroes are the soldiers who paid the ultimate price and the Marines who risked their lives to rescue us....They took a chance and because they did, I'm here."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
February 14, 2004 | From Associated Press
Nearly a year after being shot and taken prisoner in Iraq, former Army specialist Shoshana Johnson said the 22 days she spent in captivity do not make her a hero. "I'm a survivor, not a hero," Johnson told Essence magazine in its March issue. "The heroes are the soldiers who paid the ultimate price and the Marines who risked their lives to rescue us....They took a chance and because they did, I'm here."
Advertisement
NEWS
April 14, 2003 | Gayle Pollard-Terry, Times Staff Writer
Broad yellow ribbons encircle thick sugar pines in the grassy median on Degnan Boulevard, the street that leads into Leimert Park Village, the cultural heartland of black Los Angeles. Small American flags are stapled to the trunks, above signs reading "Bring Shoshana Home." Thin yellow ribbons ring trees on both sides of Manhattan Place, and around the corner on West 54th Street in front of the First United Christian Church in South L.A.
NATIONAL
October 25, 2003 | From Associated Press
The father of former prisoner of war Shoshana Johnson on Friday accused the Army of shortchanging his daughter of disability benefits after she was offered a smaller paycheck than fellow POW Jessica Lynch. "She is not getting what she deserves," Claude Johnson said. Family members confirmed that Lynch, a private first class who was snatched from her Iraqi captors on April 1 in a rescue by Special Forces, is receiving an 80% disability.
NATIONAL
October 25, 2003 | From Associated Press
The father of former prisoner of war Shoshana Johnson on Friday accused the Army of shortchanging his daughter of disability benefits after she was offered a smaller paycheck than fellow POW Jessica Lynch. "She is not getting what she deserves," Claude Johnson said. Family members confirmed that Lynch, a private first class who was snatched from her Iraqi captors on April 1 in a rescue by Special Forces, is receiving an 80% disability.
NEWS
April 17, 2003 | From Associated Press
Seven American prisoners of war who were rescued in Iraq arrived here for medical examinations Wednesday, with a smiling Army Spc. Shoshana Johnson being carried on a stretcher from a C-141 transport plane. The other six, dressed in fatigues, walked down the aircraft's rear ramp, two of them shaking hands with air base workers and three waving at reporters who waited about 50 yards away.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2010
The Early Show (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today The cast of "The Hurt Locker"; Oscar nominations; Shoshana Johnson; Michelle Rodriguez. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC Good Morning John Travolta; author Andrew Young and his wife, Cheri; Oscar nominations. (N) 7 a.m. KABC Live With Regis and Kelly Vanessa Williams; Jesse Tyler Ferguson. (N) 9 a.m. KABC The Doctors The doctors' trip to Haiti. (N) 11 a.m. KCAL Rachael Ray Alison Sweeney.
OPINION
April 4, 2003
After the 1991 Persian Gulf War, President Clinton opened several new military job categories to women. But Congress continues to bar women from combat. As the war in Iraq is proving, on the ground, the line may be a distinction without a difference. Women have served in the American armed forces since the Army Nurse Corps began in 1901. After the draft ended in 1973 and the service academies opened their doors to women, the ranks of female officers and troops expanded. Now about 15% of U.S.
NEWS
April 22, 2003 | John-Thor Dahlburg, Times Staff Writer
Five U.S. soldiers who spent 22 days in captivity in Iraq were under close observation by mental health experts Monday to see if the ordeal, as well as the sudden notoriety it conferred, has left psychological scars, Army medical officials said. The former prisoners of war, who flew back to their home base at Ft. Bliss in a triumphal Easter weekend homecoming, were also being tested for any diseases they might have contracted, said Col. Glenn W.
NATIONAL
January 1, 2004 | John J. Goldman, Times Staff Writer
Extra tight security turned Times Square into a fortress Wednesday night as hundreds of thousands of revelers celebrated New Year's Eve with cheers, confetti, fireworks and a tribute to American troops in Iraq. At midnight, as the countdown ended and a huge crystal ball reached bottom, a blizzard of multicolored paper tumbled over the crowd. People kissed, sang, danced, shouted, waved and wished each other happy new year as 2004 was born.
NEWS
April 14, 2003 | Gayle Pollard-Terry, Times Staff Writer
Broad yellow ribbons encircle thick sugar pines in the grassy median on Degnan Boulevard, the street that leads into Leimert Park Village, the cultural heartland of black Los Angeles. Small American flags are stapled to the trunks, above signs reading "Bring Shoshana Home." Thin yellow ribbons ring trees on both sides of Manhattan Place, and around the corner on West 54th Street in front of the First United Christian Church in South L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2003 | Gayle Pollard-Terry, Times Staff Writer
Former prisoner of war Shoshana Johnson stepped into a swarm Friday in front of First United Christian Church in South Los Angeles. Reporters and photographers mobbed her. Men begged for autographs. Women pointed disposable cameras. Children reached out to touch her. Inside the packed church, the cheering congregation gave Army Spc. Johnson three standing ovations even as she kept motioning for them to sit down.
SPORTS
September 14, 2003 | T.J. Simers
Fight on! The sport is barbaric, the more blood flying the better for the screaming horde, and when it's over, everyone is left waiting for the figure skating judges to tell us who won. I hate it, I love it. Let them fight until only one of them is standing, stop the mayhem. The truth be told, the Super Bowl, World Series or WNBA finals, none of them have anything on the moments leading up to a big fight and the anticipation of watching two guys try and knock each other's head off.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|