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Shoshone Indians

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NEWS
February 9, 2000 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At an isolated subdivision here, boxy government housing perches on a scrub brush hillside, wood stoves provide the only heat and televisions seem to drone all day--a sad refrain for a people who have lost their place. At least a third of the Shoshone Indians on this reservation don't have jobs. Those who do usually struggle to make a living on a tiny sliver of their once vast homeland.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2005 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Mary Dann, who fought the U.S. government to reclaim 24 million acres she considered Western Shoshone Nation ancestral land and became a heroine to Native Americans, has died. Dann, who never gave her actual age, was believed to be in her 80s. The activist died Friday night of injuries sustained in an accident on an all-terrain vehicle at her Crescent Valley, Nev., ranch. She had been mending a fence.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2005 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Mary Dann, who fought the U.S. government to reclaim 24 million acres she considered Western Shoshone Nation ancestral land and became a heroine to Native Americans, has died. Dann, who never gave her actual age, was believed to be in her 80s. The activist died Friday night of injuries sustained in an accident on an all-terrain vehicle at her Crescent Valley, Nev., ranch. She had been mending a fence.
NEWS
February 9, 2000 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At an isolated subdivision here, boxy government housing perches on a scrub brush hillside, wood stoves provide the only heat and televisions seem to drone all day--a sad refrain for a people who have lost their place. At least a third of the Shoshone Indians on this reservation don't have jobs. Those who do usually struggle to make a living on a tiny sliver of their once vast homeland.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2002 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though weary from a 30-year struggle, sisters Carrie and Mary Dann remain hopeful they can keep ancestral Western Shoshone lands in the hands of the Indian nation. But far from their dusty ranch here, an upcoming vote in Washington is expected to end their crusade. The Senate is considering disbursement of nearly $140 million to the tribe for land the government says the Indians lost 130 years ago.
NEWS
October 14, 1993 | ANNE LOUISE BANNON
A new park, created with a nifty environmental purpose, is about to be dedicated. So it's only natural to party, right? Of course. But since the nonprofit arts organization The Light-Bringer Project is in charge of it, you can bet Saturday's dedication of the Hahamongna Watershed Park in Pasadena is not going to be your usual wingding. For one thing, between 15 and 20 artists have already set up an encampment at the site and are creating works to be presented.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1995 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Toll-road builders have bulldozed a cave that some believe was a Native American observatory, angering those who had urged further study of the site. Some activists are lambasting the Transportation Corridor Agencies for quietly moving ahead with the work last month, and one woman was arrested during a protest this week. However, transportation officials say they have violated no environmental regulations and their information shows that the cave was not archeologically significant.
NATIONAL
December 3, 2002 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court took up a pair of California cases Monday, one to decide whether sex abuse charges can be brought for incidents that happened decades earlier and another to resolve whether state police can carry out raids on tribal reservations. Marion Stogner was 70 years old in 1998 when he was charged with committing lewd acts with his children from 1955 to 1973. The alleged incidents took place in Contra Costa County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1999
Over the objections of environmentalists, Native American groups, some homeowners and two political candidates, the Los Angeles City Council approved a 119-home development Wednesday on the West Bluff south of the Ballona Wetlands in the Westchester-Playa Vista area. Critics say the 44-acre site at 7501 80th St., to be developed by Catellus Development Corp.
TRAVEL
June 17, 2012 | By April Orcutt, Special to the Los Angeles Times
JARBIDGE, Nev. - To find Jarbidge - a town so isolated the federal government rates its air quality as some of the country's purest - my husband, Michael, and I spent hours covering 50 miles of a rock and dirt road, twisting and turning alongside rivers and through mountain passes. Of course, the drive would have been shorter if we hadn't stopped so often to take photographs. I had heard that Jarbidge Canyon held bizarre pillars of rock known as hoodoos, and that the 113,167-acre Jarbidge Wilderness was beautiful but that neither the canyon nor the area's 10,000-feet-plus peaks were visible from major highways.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1990
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Contemporary Documentary series continues at 8 tonight at UCLA's Melnitz Theater with Lawrence Hott and Diane Garey's informative and engaging 57-minute "The Wilderness Idea: John Muir, Gifford Pinchot and the First Great Battle for the Wilderness," which will be followed by Joel L. Freedman's recently released "To Protect Mother Earth: Broken Treaty II," dealing with the failure of the U.S.
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