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August 6, 1989 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, Times Staff Writer
Jim Doehring, a 1988 Olympic shotputter, is caught in a contradiction: He is concerned about the abuse of steroids but is not willing to give up his own use for fear of being left behind. Doehring admitted Friday that he has used steroids to help him remain a world-class track and field competitor, but he also said he wishes he didn't feel a need to do so. "I'd love to do that (compete drug-free against drug-free opponents)," he said. "I know I can throw clean just as far as anyone can."
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SPORTS
August 8, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
LONDON -- Ashton Eaton, who set a world record of 9,039 points at the U.S. Olympic trials and established himself as a medal contender at the London Games, took the lead after the first three phases of the decathlon competition Wednesday morning at Olympic Stadium. Eaton, of Portland, Ore., posted the top 100-meter dash time, 10.35 seconds, and the top long jump mark of 26 feet, 4 1/4 inches. His shotput mark of 48-1 1/4 ranked 11th. Overall, he had 2,848 points. Olympic trials runner-up Trey Hardee of Birmingham, Ala., ranked second with 2,743 points.
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SPORTS
August 3, 2012 | By David Wharton
LONDON -- U.S. shotputter Reese Hoffa won bronze Friday at the London Games. Hoffa had been one of the favorites, coming into the event with a best of 22 meters this year, but he couldn't keep pace with defending Olympic champion Tomasz Majewski of Poland, who won gold again. Another favorite, David Storl of Germany, won the silver medal. Among the other Americans in the final, Christian Cantwell finished fourth and Ryan Whiting was ninth. ALSO: Michael Phelps wins another gold in 100-meter butterfly Phil Rogers and Todd Dalhausser upset in men's beach volleyball Missy Franklin sets world record, wins gold medal in 200-meter backstroke
SPORTS
August 3, 2012 | By David Wharton
LONDON - Not much felt right to Reese Hoffa on a chilly evening at Olympic Stadium. The American shotputter could not find a rhythm. His technique was off. Only one thing made him believe he could pull things together - a long stretch of U.S. success in this event. "We continually get medals at the Olympic Games," he said. "I wanted to be part of that tradition. " Hoffa wasn't good enough to unseat defending gold medalist Tomasz Majewski of Poland, who became just the second man to repeat as champion.
SPORTS
June 7, 1987 | JOHN ORTEGA, Times Staff Writer
On a day of upsets and surprises, when many state leaders and favorites were tasting defeat, Dave Bultman of Royal High was quenching his thirst for victory at the state track and field championships at Sacramento's Hughes Stadium. Bultman, a transfer from Independence High in San Jose, won the shotput and the discus, as expected. His effort in the discus (193-6) was his second-longest throw of the year and his 67 feet in the shotput destroyed his personal best (62-0) and the field as well.
SPORTS
August 13, 1987 | Associated Press
Alessandro Andrei of Italy set a world record in the shotput with a throw of 75 feet 2 inches Wednesday at an international track and field meet. Andrei, who was the Olympic gold medalist in the shotput in 1984, broke the previous mark of 74-3 1/2, set by Udo Beyer of East Germany in East Berlin on Aug. 20, 1986. Andrei first broke Beyer's mark with a throw of 74-6 1/2, then followed with another record-breaking throw of 74-11 before cracking the 75-foot barrier on his final throw.
SPORTS
May 26, 1990 | MAL FLORENCE
When Randy Barnes broke the world record in the shotput last Sunday at UCLA's Drake Stadium, he said it wasn't a "dream throw." He said he believes he can surpass his world record of 75 feet 10 1/4 inches, and he will get that opportunity today in the Bruce Jenner meet at San Jose City College. Barnes said he had a practice throw of 79-2 1/2 a few days before the meet at UCLA. He is the first American to hold the world shotput record since Terry Albritton in 1976.
SPORTS
January 21, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Last week, after a meet at Jonesboro, Ark., shotputter Randy Barnes found himself at the wrong end of a semi-automatic rifle held by an alleged drunk in a hotel parking lot. This week, after arriving in Los Angeles, Barnes was jolted out of bed by an earthquake. Some people thought it was just him practicing. This guy never knew the indoor track and field season could be so much fun.
SPORTS
May 20, 1990 | CHRIS BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tracie Millett, the UCLA school record-holder in the women's shotput, used to take a lot of kidding from her teammates because she was a 162-pound weakling. "My nickname was Bambi because I had a strong upper body, but my legs were weak," Millett said. After she spent the off-season squatting under weights, Millett's teammates have dropped the nickname.
SPORTS
May 20, 1990 | MAL FLORENCE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If it were possible to erect a neon sign in the shotput area during the Jack in the Box Invitational meet at UCLA's Drake Stadium today, Randy Barnes would welcome the attention. "If I was ever ready to break the world record, it would be right now," said Barnes, the silver medalist in the 1988 Olympic Games. East Germany's Ulf Timmermann, the gold medalist at Seoul, is the world record-holder at 75 feet 8 inches.
SPORTS
August 3, 2012 | By David Wharton
LONDON -- U.S. shotputter Reese Hoffa won bronze Friday at the London Games. Hoffa had been one of the favorites, coming into the event with a best of 22 meters this year, but he couldn't keep pace with defending Olympic champion Tomasz Majewski of Poland, who won gold again. Another favorite, David Storl of Germany, won the silver medal. Among the other Americans in the final, Christian Cantwell finished fourth and Ryan Whiting was ninth. ALSO: Michael Phelps wins another gold in 100-meter butterfly Phil Rogers and Todd Dalhausser upset in men's beach volleyball Missy Franklin sets world record, wins gold medal in 200-meter backstroke
SPORTS
June 27, 2008 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
Adam Nelson, one of the best shotputters in the world, is lying on a bed in a Long Beach hotel, Room 526. Anyone in Room 528 probably could have heard this: "Full extension. Express. Thrust, release, follow through. Feel and I'm doing this now. I tap your forehead, it's your turn to throw. Move toward the laser, so lasered, so locked in, so absorbed in the moment and your express word. POWER." There is also New Age-y tonal music playing. But this is not what it sounds like.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2007 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
Parry O'Brien, whose fascination with the shotput and physics fueled a career in which he held the world record from 1953 to 1959 and won two gold medals and a silver medal in four Olympic games, has died. He was 75. O'Brien, who revolutionized the sport by devising a new throwing technique, died Saturday while participating in a masters' swim meet in Santa Clarita. His wife, Terry, with whom he lived in the Rancho Belago section of Moreno Valley, said he had suffered a heart attack.
SPORTS
June 24, 2005 | Lonnie White and Eric Stephens, Times Staff Writers
Paul Suzuki was expected to attend a luncheon Thursday where he and others were to be honored for their contributions to high school athletics. About the same time, Pat Whalen would have been finishing up in the junior men's shotput competition at the U.S. track and field championships at the Home Depot Center. Neither made it to his destination.
SPORTS
June 23, 2005 | Helene Elliott and Eric Stephens, Times Staff Writers
Paul Suzuki of West Los Angeles, a former landscape maintenance worker who had officiated at local track and field meets for decades, was killed Wednesday when he was struck in the head by a 16-pound shot while shotputters practiced for the U.S. track and field championships at the Home Depot Center in Carson. Suzuki, 77, was struck shortly after 4 p.m. He was treated at the scene and transported to Harbor UCLA Medical Center, where he died.
SPORTS
August 23, 2004 | Philip Hersh, Chicago Tribune
Even a return to the hallowed environs of ancient Olympia could not save track and field from its scandal-ridden self. The first woman to become a champion at a site where only men were allowed to compete in the ancient Games has tested positive for steroids.
SPORTS
May 7, 1990 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Asked to name a few personal highlights of the 1990 track and field season, Esperanza High School shotputters Mike Burns, Mark Kinney and Mark Parlin glanced at one another with bored looks and shrugged as if the question had no relevance. Despite making up the most successful shotput trio in the Southern Section, and perhaps the entire state, Burns, Kinney and Parlin act as if they do not get much joy from their sport. In fact, Burns and Kinney seem to treat it with a certain degree of disgust.
SPORTS
February 21, 1997 | JOHN ORTEGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's amazing what a disappointing performance in the biggest competition of one's life can do for a athlete's work ethic. Just ask senior Beth Burton of Cal State Northridge. Burton entered last year's NCAA outdoor track and field championships with a school-record best of 52 feet 3 1/4 inches in the shotput. But a season of too many incomplete workouts finally caught up with her and she placed 20th with a paltry effort of 39-2 1/2.
SPORTS
August 19, 2004 | Bill Plaschke
So this is home. The stands are grass, two sloping sideline hills, 2,780 years old and not a bad seat in the house. The field is 210 yards of sand, still perfectly straight and square, a lasting tribute to a groundskeeper named Hercules. The entryway is a stone corridor that leads under a stone arch, as strong and imposing as when Milo of Kroton swaggered through. So this is home, and you wonder, "Why did it take us so long to come back? And where exactly did we lose our way?"
SPORTS
August 19, 2004 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
The Olympic Games made a pilgrimage Wednesday to the place where it all began, the sanctuary at Olympia, where a Ukrainian man and a Russian woman conquered heat, dust, wind, nerves and the press of history to win gold in the shotput at the 2004 Games. Yuriy Bilonog won the men's event with a throw of 69 feet, 5 1/4 inches on his last throw.
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