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Show Boat

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1998 | MARK CHALON SMITH
For sheer emotional momentum, few passages in American musicals compare with Joe's woeful anthem, "Ol' Man River," in "Show Boat." It's the defining point in Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein's enduring musical, one that can define a production as well. Charles Mc Cowan nails the song in Fullerton Civic Light Opera's staging with a voice that shifts from resignation one moment to a hammering anger the next.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Oscar Hammerstein II's lyrics reflected his personality and belief system, making him one of the first to transform the genre of the Broadway musical from lighthearted boy-meets-girl frivolities to more substantial intellectual shows. The lyricist-librettist-producer explored the subject of miscegenation in the seminal 1927 musical "Show Boat," which he wrote with composer Jerome Kern. In 1945's "Carousel," his second collaboration with composer Richard Rodgers, Hammerstein presented a romantic drama fantasy that dealt with death, heaven and forgiveness.
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NEWS
November 21, 1989
Norma Terris, the original Magnolia when Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II opened their "Show Boat" in the 1927 production by Florenz Ziegfeld, has died at her summer home in Lyme, Conn., it was learned this week. She was 87 when she died Wednesday, the Associated Press reported. Miss Terris, who also had a home in Palm Beach, Fla., so enchanted Kern and Hammerstein that they wrote one of the hit songs from the legendary musical--"Why Do I Love You?"--while the show was still in rehearsal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan
Kathryn Grayson, an MGM singing star in the 1940s and early '50s in musicals such as "Anchors Aweigh," "Kiss Me Kate" and "Show Boat," has died. She was 88. Grayson died Wednesday of natural causes at her home in Los Angeles, said publicist Dale Olson. A dark-haired beauty with a heart-shaped face and a brilliant coloratura voice, Grayson signed with MGM as a teenager and made her screen debut in "Andy Hardy's Private Secretary," starring Mickey Rooney, in 1941. She went on to appear opposite Frank Sinatra and Gene Kelly in "Anchors Aweigh," Kelly in "Thousands Cheer," Sinatra in "The Kissing Bandit," Mario Lanza in "The Toast of New Orleans," Howard Keel in "Show Boat," "Lovely to Look At" and "Kiss Me Kate," and Gordon MacRae in "The Desert Song," among other musicals.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2002 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Hal Prince directed his Tony Award-winning revival of "Show Boat" in 1995, he boasted that he had restored much of the material that had been trimmed from the show over the years. Now, Musical Theatre West goes Prince one better. In honor of the show's 75th anniversary, MTW is presenting an uncut version as first performed in 1927. The resulting production, now running at the Carpenter Performing Arts Center in Long Beach, is a fascinating sociological document, a window into a bygone era.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1994 | LINDA WINER-BERNHEIMER, NEWSDAY
The wooden water barrels are clearly marked--"colored only" and "whites only"--at the start of the massive Harold Prince reconsideration of "Show Boat," which opened Saturday night with a record $75 ticket top at the Gershwin Theater. Three hours (and 40 years of progress) later, the clothes are freer and the dances are cheekier, and most main characters have grown wiser with their gray hair.
NEWS
August 28, 1997 | ANN CONWAY
The scene: Cast members of the epic musical "Show Boat" met with Orange County arts supporters for a Southern-style supper at Scott's Seafood Grill & Bar in Costa Mesa after their opening-night performance Tuesday at Segerstrom Hall. Southern comfort: Parched and hungry, "Show Boat" star Tom Bosley--who played Cap'n Andy in the 1995 Tony Award-winning revival--ordered a cool one for himself and his wife, Patricia, before heading for the fresh seafood displayed in a showboat-shaped ice sculpture.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1987 | HERMAN WONG, Times Staff Writer
Appearing in a community-theater production of "Show Boat" is quite a different experience for Sandy Burnard, who has spent the last decade as a leading lady on the national musical-revival circuit. She has toured in big-budget shows opposite male stars from Donald O'Connor (in "Little Me") to John Davidson (in "Oklahoma!") to Joe Namath (in "Li'l Abner").
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1989 | DON SHIRLEY
"Show Boat" keeps on rollin' for three hours on public television tonight (Channels 28, 15 and 24 at 9). This version of the 1927 musical theater landmark, by Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II, was staged at the Paper Mill Playhouse in New Jersey and shot within the theater. The first few scenes seem a little stiff, as the proportions of the river scenes are reduced to the size of the small screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1988 | NANCY CHURNIN
For most people, "Show Boat," now in a handsome production at the Starlight Bowl through July 10, is a treasure trove of some of the most beautiful songs ever written: "Ol' Man River," "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man," "After the Ball" and "Only Make Believe." But the true glory of "Show Boat," adapted from the novel by Edna Ferber, is that it is also a 61-year-old indictment of prejudice.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2009 | Associated Press
Two founders of a Broadway theater company that produced hit shows such as "Ragtime" and "Show Boat" were convicted Wednesday of accounting fraud for overstating their business' finances by millions of dollars for years. Garth Drabinsky and Myron Gottlieb, co-founders of Livent Inc., were convicted of two counts of fraud and one count of forgery. They each face a maximum of 14 years in prison.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2008 | Paul Lieberman, Times Staff Writer
NEW YORK -- "Finally my mother can see something I've done," said opera singer Nathan Gunn, "that she actually likes." The 37-year-old baritone was speaking of tonight's concert version of the pioneering musical "Show Boat," the centerpiece of a season-ending gala at Carnegie Hall, and of his appearances last month with the New York Philharmonic, playing Lancelot in "Camelot." Then there was his recent performance for the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2008 | Susan King
LACMA's festival honoring Hungarian director Bela Tarr comes to a close Friday night with his 2007 mystery "The Man From London" (pictured). Based on the Georges Simenon novel, the thriller marks the first time Tarr has filmed outside his native land -- in this case, England, of course. Oscar winner Tilda Swinton plays a dock worker's wife, whose life changes drastically when her husband witnesses a murder (lacma.org). . . . The Backlot Film Festival, which takes place Wednesday through April 5 at the Veterans Memorial Building in Culver City, will honor Carl Reiner and screen two of his films, "The Comic" and "All of Me."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2006
IN his defense of Robert Hilburn's opinion that Bob Dylan is "the most important songwriter of the 20th century," reader Fred Lucero states [Letters, Nov. 25] that he has "heard of" Irving Berlin, George Gershwin, Richard Rodgers, Jerome Kern, Cole Porter, Johnny Mercer, Harold Arlen and Duke Ellington. Lucero concedes that they were all "wonderful artists" but asks: "Can it be said that they changed the culture of this country the way Dylan did?" The answer is obvious: Yes and no. Each artist contributed immensely to our culture, thereby changing it immeasurably, but each in his own way. "Blonde on Blonde" changed 20th century America, but so did "Show Boat" and "The Wizard of Oz" and "Kiss Me, Kate" -- not to mention "Pet Sounds" and "Electric Ladyland."
MAGAZINE
February 13, 2005 | Rachel Shteir, Rachel Shteir is the author of "Striptease: The Untold History of the Girlie Show."
After fleeing New York for Los Angeles in the late 1970s, Miles Kreuger unloaded two trucks into the bottom floor of a 17-room white stucco duplex that would one day hold the world's largest private collection of musical theater and musical film memorabilia. The Library of Congress values the Kreuger archives, known as the Institute of the American Musical, at more than $1 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2002 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Hal Prince directed his Tony Award-winning revival of "Show Boat" in 1995, he boasted that he had restored much of the material that had been trimmed from the show over the years. Now, Musical Theatre West goes Prince one better. In honor of the show's 75th anniversary, MTW is presenting an uncut version as first performed in 1927. The resulting production, now running at the Carpenter Performing Arts Center in Long Beach, is a fascinating sociological document, a window into a bygone era.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1989 | MARK CHALON SMITH
Director Rob Barron finds the right current, brisk but not turbulent, in the Fullerton Civic Light Opera's "Show Boat," offering a production that steers gracefully through Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein's bountiful score. Barron, who avoids diluting the songs with indulgent theatrics or jarring, beside-the-point choreography, gets help from a very capable cast. There are few shallow spots in the singing, and the acting, while brightly colorful, rarely goes overboard.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1997 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite critical acclaim and a great historical legacy, Harold Prince's national touring production of "Show Boat" has had a not-so-bon voyage at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. With attendance averaging less than 50% since it opened in Costa Mesa four weeks ago, the show, which closes Sept. 27, will be lucky to do half as much business as center officials had projected for it. Eager to boost ticket sales, they recently slashed ticket prices for the remaining weekday performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2002 | DON SHIRLEY
Where do the good songs go? In 1917, lyricist P.G. Wodehouse outlined the journey taken by old songs after "they had their day and then we threw them away." The heavenly ditties flew to a land "on the other side of the moon," where "they're always loved and they're always new," wrote Wodehouse. These lines were part of "The Land Where the Good Songs Go," a number from the musical "Miss 1917," for which Jerome Kern wrote the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2001 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Show Boat" is a fabulous mess of a musical. The score, by Jerome Kern and lyricist Oscar Hammerstein II, is chockablock with some of the most beautiful songs ever written for the stage. But the book, which Hammerstein adapted from Edna Ferber's sprawling novel, struggles to coherently compress 41 years' worth of action.
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