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NEWS
April 28, 1991
My wife and I are very loyal and avid viewers of "L.A. Law." It is the only show we plan our schedule around. Usually we enjoy the scenarios created by the show's writers. However, the April 4 episode--which dealt with bringing Dave Meyers in as receiver for the law firm--was the most unrealistic, poorly thought-out action the writers could have undertaken. I do not believe for one minute that the presiding judge would have selected Meyers, nor would have executed his action with such fanfare.
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NEWS
April 28, 1991
My wife and I are very loyal and avid viewers of "L.A. Law." It is the only show we plan our schedule around. Usually we enjoy the scenarios created by the show's writers. However, the April 4 episode--which dealt with bringing Dave Meyers in as receiver for the law firm--was the most unrealistic, poorly thought-out action the writers could have undertaken. I do not believe for one minute that the presiding judge would have selected Meyers, nor would have executed his action with such fanfare.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1988
Lawrence Christon is a little hard on a show that's just out the gate ("Does Roseanne Rise Above It All?", Dec. 11). Waxing nostalgically over the structural conflicts and resolutions to be found in old "Honeymooner" episodes, he forgets that character backgrounds necessary to support such conflicts and resolutions take time to develop. Isn't it a bit early to tell which "Roseanne" characters represent which emotional/ideological camps on the basis of just a few episodes? Each show builds on the one before it. Let us find out about these people first--then let 'em fight.
NEWS
May 7, 1989
Call me crazy, but I spent $4.50 for a copy of the Los Angeles Times in Seattle to try and find someone to contact and express my heartfelt thanks for a super entertaining TV series--"My Two Dads." It is an absolutely delightful show that adds laughter, tears and genuine pleasure to my week. Thanks to the show's writers, producers and exceptional cast for a quality program. Pamela Smith, Woodinville, WA
NEWS
February 2, 1986
Last season I never thought of "Miami Vice" as an "MTV cop show." The series combined excellent writing with good actng. The show's writers actually allowed Don Johnson to show some emotion. This season the show does resemble MTV, and a comic-book version at that. C'mon guys, hospital rooms with purple polka dots and psychedelic patterns on the walls! And action scenes that end with one-liners like "You're busted, pal." Really now. David McNott, Claremont
NEWS
May 1, 1988
A few weeks ago on an episode of "Growing Pains," Ben Seaver and his friend were out late by themselves when a man they knew offered them a ride. Ben and his friend accepted the ride. Now what kind of writing is that? A lot of children watch "Growing Pains" and they'll think it's OK to accept a ride from someone just because they know him. A lot of children are missing because they were in that situation. I'm very disappointed in the show's writers. Curtis Goldstein, Los Angeles
NEWS
May 7, 1989
Call me crazy, but I spent $4.50 for a copy of the Los Angeles Times in Seattle to try and find someone to contact and express my heartfelt thanks for a super entertaining TV series--"My Two Dads." It is an absolutely delightful show that adds laughter, tears and genuine pleasure to my week. Thanks to the show's writers, producers and exceptional cast for a quality program. Pamela Smith, Woodinville, WA
NEWS
February 7, 1988
"I Married Dora" was a lighthearted comedy that any member of the family could view without being offended. To my dismay, ABC canceled the show and replaced it with "The Thorns." Who wants to see a family like this? The mother and father are committing adultery and the show's writers want us to consider it a comedy? We see enough of what's going on in the real world. Many are trying to deal with these unhappy, unfortunate situations. Now "The Thorns" is trying to make it seem like a joke.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
“Four years ago, I was just a guy who had a crush on a girl who had a boyfriend. I had to do the hardest thing I've ever had to do, which is just to wait. Don't get me wrong, I flirted with her … For a really long time, that's all I had: little moments with a girl who saw me as a friend. A lot of people told me I was crazy to wait this long for a date with a girl who I worked with. But I think, even then, I knew that I was waiting for my wife.” - Jim Halpert ( Season 6, Ep. 4 )
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2012 | By Claire Zulkey
In a strong episode hosted by comedian Louis C.K., “SNL” helped lighten the post-Sandy mood but without being too heavy-handed or comparing the storm to Sept. 11 (as Mayor Michael Bloomberg did, to some criticism, when attempting to keep the New York City marathon from being canceled). C.K. did address the seriousness of the storm damage, however, in a separate letter to his fans sent prior to the show. The cold open gently teased the mayor, played by Fred Armisen, as he addressed the city and pointed out that his ban on giant sugary sodas probably prevented the deaths of many obese New Yorkers who would have otherwise floated down the Hudson River.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1988
Lawrence Christon is a little hard on a show that's just out the gate ("Does Roseanne Rise Above It All?", Dec. 11). Waxing nostalgically over the structural conflicts and resolutions to be found in old "Honeymooner" episodes, he forgets that character backgrounds necessary to support such conflicts and resolutions take time to develop. Isn't it a bit early to tell which "Roseanne" characters represent which emotional/ideological camps on the basis of just a few episodes? Each show builds on the one before it. Let us find out about these people first--then let 'em fight.
NEWS
May 1, 1988
A few weeks ago on an episode of "Growing Pains," Ben Seaver and his friend were out late by themselves when a man they knew offered them a ride. Ben and his friend accepted the ride. Now what kind of writing is that? A lot of children watch "Growing Pains" and they'll think it's OK to accept a ride from someone just because they know him. A lot of children are missing because they were in that situation. I'm very disappointed in the show's writers. Curtis Goldstein, Los Angeles
NEWS
February 7, 1988
"I Married Dora" was a lighthearted comedy that any member of the family could view without being offended. To my dismay, ABC canceled the show and replaced it with "The Thorns." Who wants to see a family like this? The mother and father are committing adultery and the show's writers want us to consider it a comedy? We see enough of what's going on in the real world. Many are trying to deal with these unhappy, unfortunate situations. Now "The Thorns" is trying to make it seem like a joke.
NEWS
February 2, 1986
Last season I never thought of "Miami Vice" as an "MTV cop show." The series combined excellent writing with good actng. The show's writers actually allowed Don Johnson to show some emotion. This season the show does resemble MTV, and a comic-book version at that. C'mon guys, hospital rooms with purple polka dots and psychedelic patterns on the walls! And action scenes that end with one-liners like "You're busted, pal." Really now. David McNott, Claremont
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2013 | By Claire Zulkey
Having hosted “Saturday Night Live” four times before this weekend, Justin Timberlake was more than prepared for his fifth appearance, but to the delight of many fans, he chose to incorporate veteran “SNL” hosts and former cast members into the show. For his monologue, the show's writers revived the concept of the “ Five-Timers Club, ” which was first introduced in 1990 when Tom Hanks joined the club (for a full list of Five-Timers, go here ,  and check out the original Five-Timers sketch, with a baby-faced Conan O'Brien as the doorman, here )
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2013 | By Claire Zulkey
In case you missed it, here is a brief timeline of race relations regarding “Saturday Night Live” recently: Sept. 27: “SNL” cast member Jay Pharoah tells the Grio website that he thinks the show is “too white.” Oct. 14: Longtime cast member Kenan Thompson tells a TV Guide interviewer that he doesn't want make up the lack of diversity in the cast on “SNL” anymore by playing black female characters....
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