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BUSINESS
November 12, 1990 | From United Press International
Suits Against Japanese Firm Allege Poisoning: Dual lawsuits were filed in state and federal court against Showa Denko K.K. of Japan on behalf of roughly 120 people who allege that they or members of their family were poisoned by L-tryptophan, an amino acid that was banned in the United States last April.
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BUSINESS
November 2, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration on Friday denied a petition that sought to stop it from approving genetically engineered products. The agency said there is no evidence the products endanger the public. The Foundation on Economic Trends filed the petition in August, 1990, after more than 1,500 people became ill and more than two dozen died after taking L-tryptophan, an amino acid used as a remedy for insomnia, appetite control and depression.
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BUSINESS
November 2, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration on Friday denied a petition that sought to stop it from approving genetically engineered products. The agency said there is no evidence the products endanger the public. The Foundation on Economic Trends filed the petition in August, 1990, after more than 1,500 people became ill and more than two dozen died after taking L-tryptophan, an amino acid used as a remedy for insomnia, appetite control and depression.
NEWS
July 10, 1991 | Associated Press
A Japanese chemical manufacturer was ordered to pay more than $2 million to four people who used L-tryptophan, a food supplement linked to a rare blood disorder that killed at least 27 people. The state arbitration panel's order late Monday was the nation's first damage award against manufacturer Showa Denko Co., said Turner Branch of Albuquerque, N.M., vice chairman of a steering committee for attorneys representing L-tryptophan victims.
NEWS
July 10, 1991 | Associated Press
A Japanese chemical manufacturer was ordered to pay more than $2 million to four people who used L-tryptophan, a food supplement linked to a rare blood disorder that killed at least 27 people. The state arbitration panel's order late Monday was the nation's first damage award against manufacturer Showa Denko Co., said Turner Branch of Albuquerque, N.M., vice chairman of a steering committee for attorneys representing L-tryptophan victims.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Identifying impurities in L-tryptophan nutritional supplements associated with the eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome has been far easier than learning how to treat those afflicted with the painful and potentially fatal disease. Although new cases of the syndrome have declined precipitously after a nationwide recall of tryptophan products last November, many of those afflicted are still severely ill. Treatment "is still a big black box," said Dr. Joseph Duffy of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.
NEWS
June 13, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Researchers Tuesday presented the strongest evidence to date linking the dietary supplement L-tryptophan made by a Japanese manufacturer to an epidemic of the eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome in the United States in the fall of 1989. They also announced that specific impurities in the tryptophan produced in late 1988 and early 1989 by the chemical company, Showa Denko of Tokyo, is being investigated as a possible cause of the potentially fatal blood and muscle ailment.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1990 | From United Press International
Suits Against Japanese Firm Allege Poisoning: Dual lawsuits were filed in state and federal court against Showa Denko K.K. of Japan on behalf of roughly 120 people who allege that they or members of their family were poisoned by L-tryptophan, an amino acid that was banned in the United States last April.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Identifying impurities in L-tryptophan nutritional supplements associated with the eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome has been far easier than learning how to treat those afflicted with the painful and potentially fatal disease. Although new cases of the syndrome have declined precipitously after a nationwide recall of tryptophan products last November, many of those afflicted are still severely ill. Treatment "is still a big black box," said Dr. Joseph Duffy of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.
NEWS
June 13, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Researchers Tuesday presented the strongest evidence to date linking the dietary supplement L-tryptophan made by a Japanese manufacturer to an epidemic of the eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome in the United States in the fall of 1989. They also announced that specific impurities in the tryptophan produced in late 1988 and early 1989 by the chemical company, Showa Denko of Tokyo, is being investigated as a possible cause of the potentially fatal blood and muscle ailment.
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