Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsShowbiz
IN THE NEWS

Showbiz

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
March 14, 2010 | By Darrell Satzman
The gig: Don't call Mark Fuller, 58, a fountain maker. He prefers "feature creator." But he does make fountains -- spectacular ones. The company he founded, Wet, based in Sun Valley, has taken on some of the largest water fountain projects in the world. Projects: One of his latest creations is a 32-acre artificial lake at the foot of the world's tallest building -- the Burj Khalifa in Dubai -- with 1,500 water jets that can blast streams 500 feet in the air, plus 1,000 fog jets, all tightly choreographed to put on a computerized show to music.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
September 26, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Have you heard the one about the judge who moonlighted as a comedian? It wasn't a laughing matter for the New Jersey Supreme Court, which ruled recently that Municipal Court Judge Vince Sicari - who also appeared in comedy clubs and on television under the name Vince August - couldn't judge by day and joke by night. So Sicari is hanging up his robe. We understand the Supreme Court's concern about the importance of judicial impartiality and the appearance thereof (as a lawyer might say)
Advertisement
MAGAZINE
May 13, 2007
What a great piece by Mark Miller ("When You Think You've Hit Bottom, Look Down," The Rules of Hollywood, April 22). I sure could empathize with his showbiz plight since I was wrongfully terminated from my skating showbiz career after 6 1/2 years. I have struggled for more than a dozen years to open a new door with my production skills as a costume and scenic designer, choreographer and composer. And I've had all doors to film, TV and theater slammed shut in my face. It sure warmed my heart to read of someone else condemned to rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic, trying to rise from the ashes in his showbiz career.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
"Show People," the 1928 satire of Hollywood, could be considered the great-grandfather of last year's "The Artist," the Oscar-winning homage to the early days of filmmaking. The fast-paced comedy, starring Marion Davies and directed by King Vidor, spoofs the top stars of the day (many of whom make cameos in the film, including John Gilbert and director John Ford). It screens Thursday at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater. "I think it's one of the most authentic films about Hollywood because it was made by somebody who was deep in the making of films and was a brilliant filmmaker himself," said Kevin Brownlow of Vidor.
NEWS
June 13, 2011 | Patrick Goldstein, Los Angeles Times
Liberal Hollywood has been taking a beating in recent days, thanks to the fallout from a provocative new expose called "Primetime Propaganda: The True Hollywood Story of How the Left Took Over Your TV. " Written by Ben Shapiro, a 27-year-old Harvard Law School grad who is an executive at a conservative talk show radio network, the book is a sensation in the conservative media world, earning admiring coverage from virtually every corner of the...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Get ready to celebrate "Irving Berlin's White Christmas" on Broadway. A stage version of the celluloid classic will play New York this holiday season, Nov. 14 to Jan. 4, at the Marquis Theatre. The musical is based on the 1954 movie that starred Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye, Rosemary Clooney and Vera-Ellen. The plot concerns a couple of showbiz veterans who travel to Vermont to put on a show. Of course, there's romance involved. The stage show first appeared in 2004 in San Francisco.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2005
It's no wonder to me that ["Memoirs of a Geisha" director] Rob Marshall spent a year searching for the right Japanese actress to play Sayuri only to come up empty-handed ["The Geisha, in Translation," March 6]. His own comments speak of his actions: "That's another world for me," "that's something I can't speak about because I don't know the relationship there," "that's not where my focus is." It's very apparent that the only thing in total focus for him is being a Hollywood showbiz sellout.
NEWS
October 4, 2007 | Mike Flaherty, Special to The Times
The acerbic stand-up comedian and social commentator is celebrating 50 years in showbiz -- and last week's release of "George Carlin: All My Stuff," a 14-DVD collection of his HBO specials spanning 1977 to 2005. Although he shows no sign of slowing down, he did take some time to chat about his career, his healthy pessimism and our commander in chief. -- So, 50 years in showbiz, huh? Does that number date from a specific gig? It dates from the day I took the air at a radio station in Shreveport, La., in 1956.
NEWS
May 22, 1999 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The call came on the eve of his Los Angeles concert, just as he was leaving his home in Mexico. We have your son. Follow our instructions. Don't make trouble. It was a year ago, and Vicente Fernandez was about to headline four sold-out shows at the Pico Rivera Sports Arena, his annual Memorial Day pilgrimage to the Eastside suburbs of L.A. Now this voice, saying his 33-year-old son, his namesake, was being held for a ransom of millions.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1989 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN
"E ntertainment Tonight" will air its 2,000th show on Friday. Although thumped by critics since it debuted on Sept. 14, 1981, the syndicated program has survived. Entertainment reporters are now as common on TV as weather reporters, in part because of "ET," which has remained television's leading news show devoted solely to the entertainment industry. Last September, at the start of its eighth season, "ET" introduced a new format, with glitzier graphics, strobe-light pacing and two new features--its opening Inside Story and the ET Insider, a gossip-column-style commentary by co-star John Tesh.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2012 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
Salim Akil's smile froze as he recalled a day last year when he received a studio offer he feared might derail his blossoming career. "I remember coming home and telling my wife, 'You're not going to believe this, but they just offered me "Sparkle,"'" he said, shaking his head. "She looked at me and said, '"Sparkle"'? I said, 'Yeah, the studio wants to do a remake. But I'm not touching it. Black people ain't going to lynch me.'" Writer-producer Mara Brock Akil instantly understood.
NEWS
June 13, 2011 | Patrick Goldstein, Los Angeles Times
Liberal Hollywood has been taking a beating in recent days, thanks to the fallout from a provocative new expose called "Primetime Propaganda: The True Hollywood Story of How the Left Took Over Your TV. " Written by Ben Shapiro, a 27-year-old Harvard Law School grad who is an executive at a conservative talk show radio network, the book is a sensation in the conservative media world, earning admiring coverage from virtually every corner of the...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2010 | By Chris Lee, Los Angeles Times
To hear Sofia Coppola explain it, the genesis for her drama "Somewhere" ? an episodic tone poem about celebrity and fatherhood in modern Hollywood that reaches theaters Wednesday ? can be pin-pointed to a personal place: the intersection of intimately observed family experiences and tabloid fabulism. Early reviewers have had a field day reading levels of cinema-as-confessional into "Somewhere," which won the Golden Lion for best film at the Venice International Film Festival this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2010 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
Shepard Fairey enjoys reaching out to people whose work he admires. When he also forms a personal bond with the person he has approached, he says it feels like "things in the universe are in their correct place. " Which is why the rebellious street artist who skyrocketed to international fame in 2008 with his ubiquitous Obama "Hope" poster is particularly tickled about his budding friendship with actor/comedian/provocateur Russell Brand. Fairey traffics in the iconography of fame, and Brand, in his just-released memoir "Booky Wook 2," is obsessed with fame's machinations and implications.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Roderick Mann, a British-born show business writer who interviewed many of the world's biggest stars during a more than 40-year career that included serving as an entertainment columnist for the Los Angeles Times, died early Friday morning. He was 87. Mann, who had been battling dementia and the early stages of Alzheimer's disease the last 14 months, died of cardiopulmonary arrest at an assisted-living facility in Studio City, said his wife, Anastasia Kostoff Mann. In a journalism career that began in the late 1940s after he served as a Royal Air Force fighter pilot in World War II, Mann was the syndicated entertainment feature writer for London's Daily and Sunday Express from the 1950s through the '80s.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2010 | By T.L. Stanley, Special to the Los Angeles Times
There was no doubt in Jimmy Fallon's mind how he wanted to open the 62nd Primetime Emmy Awards, right down to the iconic Bruce Springsteen song, "Born to Run," that would serve as a soundtrack to the most ambitious "Glee" parody he'd ever done. Fallon, who hosted Sunday night's show for the first time, has repeatedly spoofed the popular Fox series on "Late Night With Jimmy Fallon. " But for the Emmy telecast, he wanted to assemble some friends and fellow Gleeks like Tina Fey, Jon Hamm and Randy Jackson for a six-minute filmed skit with live singing and dancing that he thought would start the program with a bang.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1989
Re "Raising Their Voices to Aid Armenian Orphans" by John Burman, Jan. 31: Show-biz types have recorded songs to benefit Armenia's earthquake victims, starving Ethiopians, American farm families, Bangladesh, AIDS patients and other causes. However, no one has written or recorded a song to help the victims of the greatest disaster the world has ever known, the Chernobyl nuclear accident. This unprecedented nuclear disaster, which will result in economic and agricultural harm for hundreds of years, has been swept under the rug. Obviously, the show-biz folk are selective about disaster support.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2010 | By Darrell Satzman
The gig: Don't call Mark Fuller, 58, a fountain maker. He prefers "feature creator." But he does make fountains -- spectacular ones. The company he founded, Wet, based in Sun Valley, has taken on some of the largest water fountain projects in the world. Projects: One of his latest creations is a 32-acre artificial lake at the foot of the world's tallest building -- the Burj Khalifa in Dubai -- with 1,500 water jets that can blast streams 500 feet in the air, plus 1,000 fog jets, all tightly choreographed to put on a computerized show to music.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2010 | By Roger Vincent
The gig: As general manager of the Four Seasons Hotel Los Angeles at Beverly Hills, Mehdi Eftekari is in charge of one of the region's elite hotels. The Four Seasons on Doheny Drive serves business and leisure travelers with money to spend but is best known as a magnet for show-biz people working in movies, television and music. The hotel also is home to about half of all movie industry press junkets, where reporters fly in from all over the country to interview the stars of a new release and enjoy a day or two of luxury.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|