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BUSINESS
August 6, 1997
Iwerks Entertainment Inc. of Burbank agreed to buy Culver City-based rival Showscan Entertainment Inc. for $27.4 million in stock. Both firms operate entertainment attractions that combine filmed elements with simulators designed to give the illusion of motion. Iwerks said the acquisition creates the world's largest maker of such entertainment. Separately, Iwerks reported a fiscal fourth-quarter loss of $10.
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BUSINESS
April 1, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Iwerks Entertainment Inc.'s shareholders rejected its proposed $27.4-million purchase of Showscan Entertainment Inc., saying it was too expensive. Burbank-based Iwerks' purchase of Culver City-based Showscan was opposed by Heartland Advisors, holder of 24.7% of Iwerks' stock, and by Providence Capital, also a large holder.
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BUSINESS
April 1, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Iwerks Entertainment Inc.'s shareholders rejected its proposed $27.4-million purchase of Showscan Entertainment Inc., saying it was too expensive. Burbank-based Iwerks' purchase of Culver City-based Showscan was opposed by Heartland Advisors, holder of 24.7% of Iwerks' stock, and by Providence Capital, also a large holder.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1997
Iwerks Entertainment Inc. of Burbank agreed to buy Culver City-based rival Showscan Entertainment Inc. for $27.4 million in stock. Both firms operate entertainment attractions that combine filmed elements with simulators designed to give the illusion of motion. Iwerks said the acquisition creates the world's largest maker of such entertainment. Separately, Iwerks reported a fiscal fourth-quarter loss of $10.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1996 | Times Wire Services
Exhibitors: Showscan Entertainment Inc. has sued Imax Corp., claiming it violated federal antitrust law. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, seeks unspecified damages and a court order that would prohibit Imax from filing "sham" lawsuits against Showscan and telling Showscan's customers that the company's products are unreliable. Both companies build large-screen specialty theaters for theme parks and other tourist attractions.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1998 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An antitrust suit filed by Iwerks Entertainment Inc. against giant-screen theater rival Imax Corp. has been dismissed by a federal judge in Los Angeles. Burbank-based Iwerks alleged that Imax refused to rent its films to Iwerks theaters. Iwerks also alleged that Imax threatened to name potential Iwerks customers in a lawsuit against a film projector manufacturer working for Iwerks. The suit was filed two years ago. Iwerks attorney Maxwell Blecher vowed to appeal the ruling. He said that U.S.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1998 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a troubled small company, it can nail the coffin shut. It's called a delisting--meaning the company's stock is removed from the market it trades on--and it's a growing risk for an increasing number of small companies. Tougher listing rules adopted this year by the Nasdaq Stock Market, the home of most smaller publicly traded companies, and the broad market's plunge since spring have led to a record number of Nasdaq delistings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1996 | JULIE SHEER
Fasten your seat belts, put on your headsets and enjoy the show. A night out at the movies--say, 10 or 20 years from now--could be an experience to flood the senses. Visual images are already going 3-D and digital sound is becoming the norm. In tomorrow's movie theater, images will be further enhanced, possibly using motion, smell and touch. Some movie-watching gimmicks have failed in the past, but with rapidly advancing technology, anything is possible.
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