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Showtime The Movie Channel Inc

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1997 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"From Slowtime to Showtime." That's not the motto of television's Showtime network, but executives at the pay-cable channel can recall a few years when prominent agents and producers would joke about Showtime's pace when it came to putting original movies and programming on the fast track.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2000 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rodrigo Garcia, the director of MGM's "Things You Can Tell Just By Looking at Her," lashed out at the studio Friday for its decision to release the film on cable television rather than in movie theaters. The film, whose cast includes Holly Hunter, Glenn Close, Calista Flockhart, Amy Brenneman and Cameron Diaz, was originally scheduled for theatrical release this summer. The date was subsequently pushed back to the fall.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1995 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bald, rotund comedian dancing in a one-piece gold bathing suit and boots. Suicidal puppets. A Steven Spielberg wanna-be filmmaker invading the home of a quirky Sherman Oaks family. Adult cartoons. No, these are not upcoming topics on "Ricki Lake" or "Jerry Springer." They are the farcical premises of new weekly series that the Showtime channel is mounting starting tonight as part of a strategy to establish a more distinctive identity among pay-cable companies.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2000 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Those who thought that Rick Rockwell and Darva Conger signified the end of civilization as we know it may be surprised to learn that Britisher Nevil Shute made an even brawnier statement about our potential for self-destruction in his novel "On the Beach." Now it's a sinewy TV movie.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1988 | From Reuters and
Viacom Inc., a diversified television company with interests ranging from MTV to "The Cosby Show," said Tuesday that it would sell two major cable systems and a 5% stake in its Showtime/Movie Channel unit for $575 million to reduce its heavy debt load. Viacom said it was selling the systems in Cleveland and Long Island, N.Y., and a stake in the movie channels to Cablevision Systems Corp. of Woodbury, N.Y., only because it wanted the cash.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1999 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a new player in feature films these days, a production company that is attracting big-name actors and directors, tackling difficult material and, with the three Oscar nominations nailed by "Gods and Monsters" earlier this month, even winning academy recognition. The new force in the movie business? An old stalwart in the television business: Showtime.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2000 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Those who thought that Rick Rockwell and Darva Conger signified the end of civilization as we know it may be surprised to learn that Britisher Nevil Shute made an even brawnier statement about our potential for self-destruction in his novel "On the Beach." Now it's a sinewy TV movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1997 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"This man endured what most men cannot even contemplate," Sidney Poitier says of the indomitable South African leader Nelson Mandela. Poitier stars as the man who became an international symbol of freedom in Showtime's "Mandela and De Klerk," which can be seen Sunday. Shot on location in South Africa last year, the docudrama chronicles Mandela's harrowing years as a political prisoner to his election as leader of the new democratic nation in 1994.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Showtime Buys Stake in Phoenix Pictures: The cable channel, owned by Viacom Inc., agreed to spend more than $10 million for an 11% stake in Phoenix Pictures, led by longtime studio executive Mike Medavoy and his partner Arnie Messer. As part of the deal, which hinges on Phoenix's being able to close a financing arrangement with Chemical Bank, Showtime will acquire pay-television rights to as many as 40 films over seven years released through 2002.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1999 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Coming to Showtime Sunday is a two-program package about real-life white supremacists who rob and murder for racial purity. The so-so movie "Brotherhood of Murder" traces Tom Martinez's evolving role in a dusky anti-government hate group known as the Order, and his subsequent redemption and decision to spy on these dangerously twisted fruitcakes for the FBI.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1999 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
The gap is widening. As the networks wallow in such ratings-sweeps trivia as NBC's "Y2K" and CBS' "Aftershock in New York," cable's HBO and Showtime continue producing television's most daring and stimulating movies. Not having to rely on ratings pays off for subscription-driven HBO and Showtime, and also rewards their viewers. Without these two, TV moviedom would be nearly all gruel.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1999 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
A loud boom arrives Sunday. It's Showtime's Emmy warning shot across the bow of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. A flashback to 1991, the magnetic new movie is "Strange Justice," more evidence that world-class HBO and fast-rising Showtime just about own the franchise when it comes to important, topical dramas on TV. How important and topical? Think back eight years to the Clarence Thomas-Anita Hill show, the most tense and captivating political telecast in years. Remember?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1999 | TOM SHALES, THE WASHINGTON POST
Do you remember the future? How glorious it was! Technology solved all the problems of the human race and seemed to create no new ones of its own. People glided around in electric cars on electric roads or lived in self-sustaining undersea cities. Much of it was ridiculous, and little of it came true. But looking back on it now proves fascinating and sobering in "Yesterday's Tomorrows," a film made by director Barry Levinson as part of Showtime's ongoing "In the 20th Century" specials.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1999 | DAVID CHUTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pity the beleaguered TV executive: Every broadcast outfit on earth is expected to come up with some sort of program to mark the end of the millennium. How to provide a satisfying overview, when no two people seem to agree on the significance of any part of it? One approach might be to embrace the personal, to combine several idiosyncratic views into a "Rashomon"-style mix of viewpoints, with the subjective element built in.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1999 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a new player in feature films these days, a production company that is attracting big-name actors and directors, tackling difficult material and, with the three Oscar nominations nailed by "Gods and Monsters" earlier this month, even winning academy recognition. The new force in the movie business? An old stalwart in the television business: Showtime.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1998 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
A mole is a deep-penetration agent so called because he burrows deep into the fabric of Western imperialism . . . --British agent Ricky Tarr in "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy" by John le Carre * In 1985, CIA man Aldrich H. Ames entered the Soviet Embassy in Washington offering to go on the KGB payroll. Nine years later, he entered the federal penitentiary in Allenwood, Pa., for life. Now comes a movie explaining how he got there.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1998 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Showtime's "Armistead Maupin's More Tales of the City," everything is basically status quo among the eccentric inhabitants of 28 Barbary Lane: Anna Madrigal is smoking pot in her front parlor, musing about life; Mona's in a Nevada whorehouse dressed as a nun; and Mary Ann's cruising to Mexico, falling in love with a guy who's too good to be true.
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