Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsShroud Of Turin
IN THE NEWS

Shroud Of Turin

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 13, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The burial cloth many believe shrouded Jesus Christ survived its second brush with fire in 465 years, but officials said the Baroque chapel that housed it suffered incalculable damage. Authorities were still assessing the impact of Friday's late-night fire at the San Giovanni Cathedral in Turin and its Guarini Chapel, home of the Shroud of Turin. The shroud in its silver urn was snatched from the flaming chapel by firefighters who hammered their way through four layers of bulletproof glass.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2004 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
Some men have hobbies. Others have obsessions. And with enough money, an obsession can turn into a museum and let the whole world in for a peek. Which is why on the second floor of a nondescript office building in Fountain Valley, sandwiched between bicycle shops, sits the Shroud Center of Southern California. The name doesn't do it justice. It misses the point, and the sign probably wouldn't pull in anyone off the street. What's the big deal about shrouds?
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1995 | From Associated Press
The Shroud of Turin, purportedly Christ's burial garment, has inspired the faithful for centuries. But seven years ago, radiocarbon dating put it at 700 years old, and it seemed that faith must yield to science and admit it might be a forgery. But a Russian biochemist now says the radiocarbon findings are wrong--that the process was marred by a failure to consider smoke damage to the garment--and the shroud is at least 1,800 years old.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
E.T. Hall, the Oxford University professor whose scientific analysis helped to expose the Piltdown Man hoax and determine the age of the Shroud of Turin, has died at 77. Hall, who founded and directed the Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History of Art at Oxford, died Aug. 11, his family said. The cause of death was not announced. Hall was a leading authority on archeometry, a discipline that employs radiocarbon dating and other techniques to authenticate archeological discoveries.
NEWS
September 19, 1988
The London Sunday Times reported that the results of laboratory tests in England, Switzerland and Arizona will show that the Shroud of Turin--believed by some to be the burial shroud of Christ--is a fake. "Papal representatives in Italy will announce next month what religious skeptics have long suspected: that the Shroud of Turin is a medieval fake . . . forged between the years 1000 and 1500," the newspaper said. The Vatican has declined to comment.
NEWS
April 19, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The Shroud of Turin, a yellowing sheet bearing the inexplicable image of a crucified man that some revere as Christ's burial cloth, went on display for only the fourth time this century. Enclosed in a glass case filled with inert gas, the fragile linen cloth was hung in Turin's cathedral, where up to 50,000 people a day are expected to line up to view the relic. In 1988, scientists concluded after testing scraps of the cloth that it dated to between 1260 and 1390.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1999 | Associated Press
The Shroud of Turin is much older than some scientists believe, according to researchers who used pollen and plant images to conclude that it dates from Jerusalem before the 8th century. The study contradicts a 1988 examination by scientists who said the shroud was made between 1260 and 1390. As a result, it gives a boost to those who believe the shroud is the burial cloth of Jesus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2000
Donald James Lynn, 68, former Jet Propulsion Laboratory scientist who studied the controversial Shroud of Turin. A native of Cicero, Ill., Lynn came to Los Angeles to study nuclear engineering at UCLA. He began working with aerospace companies while studying for his master's degree, starting with Douglas Aircraft. Later he spent 20 years working with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory on projects for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, including the Voyager project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1988 | Associated Press
Oxford University scientists have tested a fragment from the Shroud of Turin to determine if it dates from the period of the crucifixion of Jesus Christ. This week's tests, using carbon-14 dating, were directed by Prof. Edward Hall, head of Oxford's research laboratory for archeology and the history of art. The nearly 15-foot length of linen, bearing the image of a bearded, crucified man, is venerated by believers who accept that it covered Jesus' body in his tomb.
NEWS
April 23, 1988 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
The Vatican announced Friday that three small pieces have been cut from the Shroud of Turin for carbon-14 dating tests in order to settle a long-standing mystery about the linen believed by some Christians to have been Jesus' burial cloth. The separate analyses will be done by scientists at the University of Arizona, Oxford University in England and the Federal Polytechnic Institute in Zurich.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2000
Donald James Lynn, 68, former Jet Propulsion Laboratory scientist who studied the controversial Shroud of Turin. A native of Cicero, Ill., Lynn came to Los Angeles to study nuclear engineering at UCLA. He began working with aerospace companies while studying for his master's degree, starting with Douglas Aircraft. Later he spent 20 years working with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory on projects for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, including the Voyager project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2000 | Religion News Service
The Shroud of Turin will go on public display in its home city this summer and fall, and Roman Catholic Church officials once again are questioning tests that indicate the much venerated cloth is a medieval fake. "The last word has not yet been said on this case," Archbishop Severino Poletto of Turin, who serves as custodian of the shroud, told a recent Vatican news conference. Poletto said that, on instructions of Pope John Paul II, the shroud will be displayed to the public from Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1999 | Associated Press
The Shroud of Turin is much older than some scientists believe, according to researchers who used pollen and plant images to conclude that it dates from Jerusalem before the 8th century. The study contradicts a 1988 examination by scientists who said the shroud was made between 1260 and 1390. As a result, it gives a boost to those who believe the shroud is the burial cloth of Jesus.
NEWS
May 25, 1998 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a quiet river, the pilgrims flow through the cathedral by the tens of thousands each day. They stop for exactly two minutes to contemplate the faint traces of a bearded man's face, limbs and folded hands on a yellowing sheet hung in the nave. They stand in silence, some in tears, then exit on cue. No wailing, no pushing. This is not Lourdes or Fatima, where the sick pray for miracle cures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here's how badly Dr. August David Accetta wants to prove the Shroud of Turin is Jesus Christ's burial cloth: He once injected himself with nuclear medicine to try to show radiation emitted from a human--like a flash from a resurrection--could produce a similar image. Not so surprising, really, considering this ob-gyn spends $20,000 to $30,000 of his own money each year to subsidize his 2-year-old museum in Huntington Beach, the Shroud Center of Southern California.
NEWS
April 13, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The burial cloth many believe shrouded Jesus Christ survived its second brush with fire in 465 years, but officials said the Baroque chapel that housed it suffered incalculable damage. Authorities were still assessing the impact of Friday's late-night fire at the San Giovanni Cathedral in Turin and its Guarini Chapel, home of the Shroud of Turin. The shroud in its silver urn was snatched from the flaming chapel by firefighters who hammered their way through four layers of bulletproof glass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1989 | JULIET TOWHIDI, Reuters
A group of academicians say they will try to prove that the controversial Turin shroud, which many Christians have believe bears the imprint of Christ's body, is not a medieval fake. More than 300 people attended a two-day conference late this week in Paris, the first since the Roman Catholic Church announced last October that carbon-dating tests proved the cloth was a clever forgery from the 13th Century.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|