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Shrubs

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FOOD
May 26, 2012 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
Shrubs - they're not just for hiding in! Tart, acidic and weirdly, wonderfully refreshing, drinking vinegars known as "shrubs" are finding a savory home on a growing number of Los Angeles drink menus. Sometimes they're added to soda water as an alternative to mainstream sodas, and sometimes they're mixed with booze as a mouth-pleasing alternative to predictable acids such as lemons and limes. Either way, they're adding a welcome new dimension to the ever-evolving Los Angeles craft cocktail scene.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
An area that just a week ago was lush habitat on the Sepulveda Basin's wild side, home to one of the most diverse bird populations in Southern California, has been reduced to dirt and broken limbs - by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Audubon Society members stumbled upon the barren landscape last weekend during their annual Christmas bird count. Now, they are calling for an investigation into the loss of about 43 acres of cottonwood and willow groves, undergrowth and marshes that had maintained a rich inventory of mammals, reptiles and 250 species of birds.
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OPINION
December 3, 2008
Re "All he is saying is give brush a chance," Nov. 26 The article about Rick Halsey and the beauty and significance of the chaparral plant community in California was of special interest to me. I was the photographer for Milt McAuley's "Wildflowers of the Santa Monica Mountains," first published in 1985, which featured not just wildflowers but also chaparral and fire ecology. The continual reference to these fire- and drought-adapted shrubs as "brush" has always been offensive, dismissing them as of little interest.
FOOD
May 26, 2012 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
Shrubs - they're not just for hiding in! Tart, acidic and weirdly, wonderfully refreshing, drinking vinegars known as "shrubs" are finding a savory home on a growing number of Los Angeles drink menus. Sometimes they're added to soda water as an alternative to mainstream sodas, and sometimes they're mixed with booze as a mouth-pleasing alternative to predictable acids such as lemons and limes. Either way, they're adding a welcome new dimension to the ever-evolving Los Angeles craft cocktail scene.
HOME & GARDEN
September 26, 2009 | Nan Sterman
The recent recession-fueled explosion of backyard vegetable gardens caught the nursery industry somewhat by surprise. Everyone, it seems, wants to grow tomatoes, cucumbers and eggplants, even those folks who have never before picked up a shovel. Starting this fall, however, nurseries and garden centers will be filling aisles with more than plants that feed us. Growers and store buyers say consumers can expect to see more lovely textures coming to market and, best of all, more plants that require less water.
MAGAZINE
August 6, 1995
The most awesome aspect of Miguel Gandert's photographs in Jeff Wheelwright's "The Endless Fascination With Ground Zero" (June 25) is that green shrubs and clumps of grass are growing there only 50 years after the first atomic explosion. Nature has a way of repairing the mistakes of humans. Larry Briggs Twentynine Palms
SPORTS
January 30, 1988
In the Morning Briefing of Jan. 20, you quote Don Sutton saying to a reporter of a Tom Lasorda interview: "You know what you can do with all those notes you took? Shred 'em and put 'em around the shrubs at home and watch them grow." I would suggest to that reporter if he really wants his shrubs to grow, to include Mike Downey's column of the same day. The whole nonsensical piece being nothing more than the meandering of "a liberal white with a bleeding heart"--to use Downey's own introspective quote of himself.
NEWS
April 28, 1985
Lately, I have not seen many home-oriented articles in your magazine. The March 24th issue--with the cover story "The New Femininity"--was the last straw. It was absurd and out of place. Even worse, that issue contained nothing whatever about homes, home decorating, landscaping, etc., except a small article on shrubs in the back pages of the magazine. I miss the real Home magazine and hope to see an improvement in the near future. Bill Sluka Studio City
OPINION
August 19, 2001
Re "One Man's Crusade to Take a Peak Into History," Aug. 13: Richard Toyon's quest to rename a Verdugo mountain peak "Tongva Peak" to honor the Gabrielino/Tongva native Indians of the area proves that if you live long enough you will have seen and heard everything. Imagine naming a mountain peak instead of a football or other sports team after Indians. Now, if we can just find a way to keep the toyon shrubs from disappearing from our local "shrub" hillsides. Bob Ginn Arcadia
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1992
How wonderfully refreshing to open the Ventura County Edition of the Los Angeles Times recently and read about the Ventura High School graduating seniors who are building a gift from their class to the school. It was an ambitious plan to be sure, with a fountain bubbling up from a pool, surrounded by flowers and shrubs. Instead of graffiti splashed on walls, their fellow students were enlisted to donate time and effort in any capacity they wished. Those students' efforts would be remembered and cherished for years to come.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2012 | By Debbie Arrington
Future generations may never know the beauty of Diana, Princess of Wales; sniff Catalina in the sunshine; or fall for Beloved. For a century, devoted gardeners have appreciated the marvels of delicate and finicky hybrid roses and referred to them by name, like pets or family. The product of generations of breeding, the queen of flowers could act like a spoiled princess because its delicate blooms offered a special reward. In recent years, though, time-strapped homeowners have traded their big teas for compact shrub roses — utilitarian soldiers in the landscape that could cover ground without fuss.
SCIENCE
December 22, 2009 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Nestled between two boulders on a low rise in the Jurupa Hills of Riverside County, a good 30 miles from its nearest living relative, lies the ultimate survivor -- an oak bush that researchers believe is 13,000 years old. That's 1,000 years older than a previously identified Palm Springs creosote bush that was thought to be the oldest plant in California, 8,000 years older than bristlecone pines and 10,000 years older than the redwoods. While it is one of the world's oldest living plants, it is probably not the oldest.
HOME & GARDEN
September 26, 2009 | Nan Sterman
The recent recession-fueled explosion of backyard vegetable gardens caught the nursery industry somewhat by surprise. Everyone, it seems, wants to grow tomatoes, cucumbers and eggplants, even those folks who have never before picked up a shovel. Starting this fall, however, nurseries and garden centers will be filling aisles with more than plants that feed us. Growers and store buyers say consumers can expect to see more lovely textures coming to market and, best of all, more plants that require less water.
HOME & GARDEN
April 25, 2009 | Debra Prinzing
Convinced that they could save an aging 1925 Spanish Colonial Revival and tame its landscape, Robin Colman and Cheryl Bode bought an Altadena house and spent the next decade returning it to its historical roots. "It feels like you're taking a step out of the hustle and bustle of city life," Colman says of the community, set in the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains. For help with their 3/4 -acre grounds, Bode and Colman turned to Altadena landscape designer Thomas Batcheller Cox.
HOME & GARDEN
January 31, 2009 | Emily Green
Now that our new president has called us to service, Southern Californians have another reason to pitch in and avert a looming water crisis. We can do it now, and the first step couldn't be simpler or cheaper or more beautiful. Plant manzanita. In contrast to lawn, manzanita needs little more than an occasional pass with the hose. You'd have to succumb to an epic daydream to create run-off while watering it. That alone should close the argument.
HOME & GARDEN
January 3, 2009 | Nan Sterman
Olive green above, dusky purple below -- these are the leaves of Arabian lilac, an evergreen shrub that provides year-round color in the garden. Arabian lilac (Vitex trifolia 'Purpurea') is not a true lilac but, rather, a cousin to the chaste tree (Vitex agnus-castus), a Mediterranean native. The term "lilac" comes from those purple-bottomed leaves, pleasantly fragrant and occasionally divided into three ovals ("trifolia" means "three leaves").
HOME & GARDEN
May 1, 2003
Thank you for the wonderful article on gardens and their influence on Southern California ("Where the World Is Abloom," April 24). Our lush and varied landscapes, both public and private, are a true joy of living here. There are two areas, though, where I believe our gardening heritage is being challenged: the ever-encroaching "topiary" style as a result of trimming shrubs by power tools and the overuse of palms in public landscapes. How often has one seen a group of New Zealand flax after they've been given a flattop by a hedge trimmer?
OPINION
December 3, 2008
Re "All he is saying is give brush a chance," Nov. 26 The article about Rick Halsey and the beauty and significance of the chaparral plant community in California was of special interest to me. I was the photographer for Milt McAuley's "Wildflowers of the Santa Monica Mountains," first published in 1985, which featured not just wildflowers but also chaparral and fire ecology. The continual reference to these fire- and drought-adapted shrubs as "brush" has always been offensive, dismissing them as of little interest.
HOME & GARDEN
August 23, 2008 | Nan Sterman, Special to The Times
ITS BOLD, frond-like leaves are an icy green, and its 18-inch spires of burgundy flowers lure swarms of hummingbirds in search of sweet nectar. The honey bush, a soft-stemmed perennial shrub from South Africa, makes a striking centerpiece for a low-water California garden. Those huge, serrated-edged leaves are the first things that draw garden lovers to the honey bush. Multiple stems rise from a central point. Allow them all to develop, and you'll have an 8- to 10-foot-wide shrub of 6-foot tall stems.
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