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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2005 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Architect Henry George Greene, who designed the ABC Entertainment Center in Century City, a complex that included the Shubert Theatre and several movie theaters, has died. He was 93. Greene died March 13 of natural causes at his home in Scarsdale, N.Y., according to Sandra Engelson, his longtime administrative assistant. Greene's design for the Century City complex, built in 1972 and demolished 30 years later, represented a particular era in entertainment center design.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2010 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
"Memphis," which took home the Tony for best musical Sunday, is the latest awards juggernaut to emerge from the La Jolla Playhouse, the San Diego County theater company that has had an enviable track record of turning out Tony-winning (and -nominated) hits. A crowd-pleaser about race relations and '50s-era R&B, "Memphis" opened at La Jolla in 2008 in a production directed by Christopher Ashley, the company's artistic director. (The musical was previously co-produced by the North Shore Music Theatre and TheatreWorks in 2003-04.
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BUSINESS
August 28, 2001 | BRAD BERTON and DON SHIRLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The ABC Entertainment Center and the Shubert Theatre, since 1972 the home of many of the longest-running theatrical productions in Los Angeles, will be razed as part of plans to construct a striking 15-story office building on the site, officials said Monday. Dallas-based Trammell Crow has been operating the ABC complex and adjacent 44-story Century Plaza towers for more than four years.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2009
Re Christopher Hawthorne's commentary on Century City ["A Landmark of '60s L.A. Attitude," June 1], I watched the development take shape in the mid-1960s. Two things were immediately obvious: The buildings were all boring (except for the Fox Tower, which came later), and area planners were in collusion with valet parking companies to gouge the driving public. Even today, there's almost no place to park in Century City without paying outrageous fees. Given the development's pro-business, anti-people orientation, it's hard to be upset when a specific building is razed or altered.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1992 | DAVID GRITTEN and DON SHIRLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Look for the American premiere of Andrew Lloyd Webber's new musical version of "Sunset Boulevard" to take place next October or November at the Shubert Theatre in Century City, following its world premiere in London on June 29--and also following major structural renovations at the Shubert that will alter the look of the balcony.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1997
2 & 8pm Theater Make "Ragtime" a post-holiday treat. There's still time to catch the acclaimed, deeply moving musical epic at the Shubert Theatre before it closes March 8. Terrence McNally's adaptation of E.L. Doctorow's novel, with music by Stephen Flaherty and lyrics by Lynn Ahrens, will be opening on Broadway on Jan. 18. * "Ragtime," Shubert Theatre, 2020 Ave. of the Stars, Century City, Wednesday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 2 p.m.; Wednesday, 1:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2009
Re Christopher Hawthorne's commentary on Century City ["A Landmark of '60s L.A. Attitude," June 1], I watched the development take shape in the mid-1960s. Two things were immediately obvious: The buildings were all boring (except for the Fox Tower, which came later), and area planners were in collusion with valet parking companies to gouge the driving public. Even today, there's almost no place to park in Century City without paying outrageous fees. Given the development's pro-business, anti-people orientation, it's hard to be upset when a specific building is razed or altered.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2001 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Call it the blond-on-blond "Riverdance," a new touring edition of the 1995 Irish extravaganza that opened a three-week run at the Shubert Theatre on Tuesday. There's only one redhead among the 49 dancers but golden locks galore--starting with leads Michael Patrick Gallagher of Galway and Tara Barry of Cork. Gallagher exudes no great charisma or authority but, begorrah, what flying feet!
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Kingsley Leggs does some of the best stage crying I have ever seen. Leggs plays Coalhouse Walker in "Ragtime," replacing Brian Stokes Mitchell at the Shubert Theatre. In the funeral that ends Act 1 of the epic musical, Leggs gives us a man whose sobbing adds a new layer of understanding to the violence that follows. Leggs makes Coalhouse's tragedy more personal than political.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1992 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While watching "Cats," in its third visit to the Shubert Theatre (and its 11th to the L.A. area), the thought occurred that it was Andrew Lloyd Webber who wrote this year's campaign music for the Tory Party--which beat the Labor Party even without Margaret Thatcher. Lloyd Webber's epic musical of "felininity," inspired by T.S. Eliot's "Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats," is the apotheosis of the no-holds-barred spectacle style of the Thatcher-Reagan era.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2005 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Architect Henry George Greene, who designed the ABC Entertainment Center in Century City, a complex that included the Shubert Theatre and several movie theaters, has died. He was 93. Greene died March 13 of natural causes at his home in Scarsdale, N.Y., according to Sandra Engelson, his longtime administrative assistant. Greene's design for the Century City complex, built in 1972 and demolished 30 years later, represented a particular era in entertainment center design.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2003 | Martha Groves, Times Staff Writer
City planners Thursday unanimously approved a strikingly designed office complex that would replace Century City's aging ABC Entertainment Center and Shubert Theatre. As part of the $300-million project, developer Trammell Crow Co. of Dallas also plans to build a cultural facility to ease the loss of the 2,200-seat Shubert, which went dark months ago after 30 years of offering such Broadway hits as "Evita" and "Beauty and the Beast."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2002 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Levi likes what he sees in Century City. "I have a view from Beverly Hills to Long Beach," he says. "I have 48 feet of windows and a balcony. I look down on 200-plus varieties of trees and thousands of flowers. The flowers are changed as needed--about 21/2 times a year. "I love it here. I do." Levi lives in Century City, an exclusive Los Angeles enclave of high-rise offices, underground parking and an almost invisible neighborhood of residences. Four thousand people, in fact, live in the half-square-mile area on the southwestern edge of Beverly Hills that was built as Los Angeles' first experiment with mixed-use development.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2002 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Brad Ellis looked out from the stage of the Shubert Theatre at a sea of 2,100 empty seats that soon will be removed in preparation for the theater's demolition, scheduled for November. "To be here tonight," Ellis said, "is like being in the show 'Follies.'" It was Saturday evening, as about 220 guests were arriving for the Shubert's "wrecking ball party," a chance for people who worked at the Century City theater to say farewell to the 30-year-old home of many of L.A.'s longest-running shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2001 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Let's heave a sigh for the Shubert Theatre, slated soon for demolition. For two weeks, however, the Shubert is hosting one more for the road--literally. A new production of "The Who's Tommy" is launching its tour here. This is one finale that's less than grand. Those who remember only the Des McAnuff-staged version of "Tommy" from La Jolla, Broadway or its national tour are in for a letdown. The pizazz is kaput. The visual effects in the McAnuff "Tommy" were eye-popping.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2001 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The twice-postponed nighttime Emmy Awards found themselves overmatched Sunday by the seventh game of the World Series, delivering the smallest audience for an Emmy ceremony since the then-fledgling Fox network carried the broadcast in 1990. That said, the Emmys held up reasonably well in light of the inordinate competition.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1993 | BARBARA ISENBERG
More than 420 people vied to be the first ticket-holders for the U.S. premiere of Andrew Lloyd Webber's "Sunset Boulevard." The crowd lined up before tickets went on sale Sunday at 6 p.m.--sunset--at Century City's Shubert Theatre. The theater reported record-breaking ticket sales by the time the box office had closed at midnight. First in line was Paul Arenson, a 20-year-old UC Irvine student who said he arrived at 8:15 that morning to buy tickets for his mother. By 4 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1989 | JAN HERMAN, Times Staff Writer
The crew at the Grove Shakespeare Festival is working feverishly to redesign the set of Murray Schisgal's "The Songs of War," which is slated for its world premiere at the Gem Theatre in Garden Grove as the festival's second offering of the season. The radical redesign, ordered by the playwright, has forced the postponement of the show's opening date from July 7 to July 12, a festival official said Friday. Previews will not be affected, however; they will run July 5-9 as previously scheduled.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2001 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With one official comparing his mandate to that of theater presenters in World War II-era England, organizers of the 53rd Annual Prime-Time Emmy Awards elaborated Wednesday on their plans for this year's ceremony, which will be held Nov. 4 at the Shubert Theatre in Century City. Still unknown is how many top-drawer nominees will show up Nov. 4. Some stars, including Dennis Franz, the Emmy-nominated actor on ABC's "NYPD Blue," have expressed the hope that the Emmys wouldn't be held this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2001
On Wednesday, the day after America's terror, performances of "Kiss Me, Kate," Cole Porter's 1948 musical hit, resumed at the Shubert Theatre. Even though my wife and I were heavy with grief following the terror visited upon our country, we used the tickets we had purchased long before in an attempt to begin the restoration of normalcy in our lives. The show went on with energy and enthusiasm. The audience was small but receptive. People were still able to laugh and applaud. The performers were able to transport us, even for a short time, from the shock we were in. And, I guess, our presence in that theater required that the cast and crew refocus on their jobs: to entertain us. In so doing, we released them, for that same short time, from their pain.
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