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Shubho Shankar

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1992 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A memorial service will be held Saturday for Garden Grove musician and composer Shubho Shankar, son of renowned sitar player Ravi Shankar. The nondenominational memorial will be at 2:30 p.m. at the Vedic Samaj-Om Center, a Hindu religious and educational center in Bellflower. Shubho Shankar, who had been performing with his father for a decade, was 50 when he died of pneumonia on Sept. 15 at Los Alamitos Medical Center.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1992 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A memorial service will be held Saturday for Garden Grove musician and composer Shubho Shankar, son of renowned sitar player Ravi Shankar. The nondenominational memorial will be at 2:30 p.m. at the Vedic Samaj-Om Center, a Hindu religious and educational center in Bellflower. Shubho Shankar, who had been performing with his father for a decade, was 50 when he died of pneumonia on Sept. 15 at Los Alamitos Medical Center.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1992 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Musician and composer Shubho Shankar, son of renowned sitar player Ravi Shankar, has died of pneumonia. He was 50. Shankar, who had been ill for the last several months at his home in Garden Grove, died Tuesday at Los Alamitos Medical Center, his family announced Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1992 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Musician and composer Shubho Shankar, son of renowned sitar player Ravi Shankar, has died of pneumonia. He was 50. Shankar, who had been ill for the last several months at his home in Garden Grove, died Tuesday at Los Alamitos Medical Center, his family announced Sunday.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | JOHN NEEDHAM, Times Staff Writer
Shubho Shankar was the last of the three musicians to walk onto the wooden stage and sit cross-legged on the floor. He picked up his sitar, tightened a string or two and flashed a thousand-watt smile that lit up the dark auditorium. Shyam Kane tapped on the tabla drums, and Rajeev Taranath strummed the sarod.
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Physician Nardinar Singh heard the news from a patient in his Orange office. A colleague at UC Irvine caught AIDS researcher Sudhir Gupta coming out of a meeting, asking him urgently, "Did you hear what happened?" And a friend found Shubho Shankar, son of the famous sitarist, by phone at home in Garden Grove to pass along word of the day's events.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arching over all the technical accomplishment and flash of Chitresh Das' Kathak dance concert Saturday at Brea Olinda High School was grief over the death of Shubho Shankar, son of renowned Indian composer and sitar player Ravi Shankar, who had succumbed to pneumonia four days earlier at the age of 50. Shubho Shankar, a composer and musician himself, was a resident of Garden Grove.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arjuna and Karna are deadly enemies in the Indian epic "Mahabharata," and so it made sense for Indian dancers Viji Prakash and Anjani Ambegaokar to try juxtaposing two different--though not antagonistic--dance styles in their "Sons of Kunti" version of the epic on Monday at Wadsworth Theater in Westwood. Prakash, an exponent of Bharata Natyam--a southern Indian style characterized by angular and symmetrical movements--danced Arjuna with clarity, precision and sharpness.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles dancer and choreographer Viji Prakash continues to push the boundaries of the South Indian Bharata Natyam dance form in her problematic "Women in the Mahabharata," which was presented Sunday at the Irvine Barclay Theatre. Before the three-hour dance-drama veers off into trying to make contemporary connections to the Hindu epic, it dwells on the goddess Ganga and other female characters that other versions sometimes slight.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1991 | JOHN HENKEN
Many elements have figured in the Ravi Shankar legend, making him the sitarist of record for most listeners in this country. But the durable core component--beyond technical and sociological factors--is his obvious pleasure in his music and the ability to communicate. That is what made his four-hour marathon, Sunday evening at Ambassador Auditorium, an expansive exercise in shared joys. The evening was very much a family affair.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | JOHN NEEDHAM, Times Staff Writer
Shubho Shankar was the last of the three musicians to walk onto the wooden stage and sit cross-legged on the floor. He picked up his sitar, tightened a string or two and flashed a thousand-watt smile that lit up the dark auditorium. Shyam Kane tapped on the tabla drums, and Rajeev Taranath strummed the sarod.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1990 | GREGG WAGER
With sitarist Ravi Shankar turning 70 this year, at least one of his birthday parties will be hard to forget. Seven esteemed classical Indian musicians--including Shankar himself--performed with their ensembles Saturday and Sunday at Pasadena City College's Sexson Auditorium, honoring the musician's birthday (April 7) and his 50-year career in an event entitled "Festival '90." The gathering was sponsored by the Music Circle.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES
Arching over all the technical accomplishment and flash of Chitresh Das' Kathak dance concert Saturday at Brea Olinda High School was grief over the death of Shubho Shankar, son of Ravi Shankar, who had succumbed to pneumonia four days earlier at the age of 50. Shubho Shankar, a composer and musician himself, was a resident of Garden Grove. Das and his musicians dedicated the program, which was sponsored by the Pasadena-based Music Circle, to Shubho, with whom they had appeared.
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