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NEWS
March 11, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
Mabel Glenn, 86, gripped her 6-foot cue stick with grim determination and gazed, steely-eyed, at the triangular-shaped box at the far end of the court. WHAM! It was her hammer shot--the last of her four discs to be played. She blasted her opponent's black disc out of the 10-point spot, and replaced it with her own. "Every time I play Mabel, she beats me. My God, that woman has keen eyes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2010 | By Margaret Wappler, Los Angeles Times
When most of us hear the word "pool," we think of old sharks in leather jackets, peeling off bills and throwing them onto the green felt, challenging us to a game where we can't save ourselves with the usual slop shot into the corner pocket. At Spot 5750, the spit-polished revamp of Hollywood Billiards, the pool tables ? with red felt, not green ? are open for accuracy-challenged shooters as well as "The Color of Money" types. With more staff, new carpeting, new paint, a new exterior and several other changes to the 25,000-square-foot space, co-owner Don Conner wanted to create a concept that was "hip, approachable and upscale.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1995
Katherine Dowling's commentary, "Redefining 'Have' and 'Have Not' " (May 10), represents some of the most specious reasoning to grace your pages. Moving from the case of one welfare mother who stays home to take care of her child--not necessarily the best source for an overview of the origin, development and consequences of the entire social support system in place throughout the U.S.--Dowling moves on to conclude that the happy, carefree recipients of Aid to Families With Dependent Children, Social Security and Social Security Disability benefits are the great winners in society because they have "free time."
MAGAZINE
March 12, 2006 | [By Milt Policzer]
From Wang vs. Princess Cruise Lines Ltd., a complaint in Los Angeles County Superior Court: "Plaintiffs' substandard accommodations caused them embarrassment among their traveling companions, who chided and ridiculed Plaintiffs throughout the cruise."
MAGAZINE
March 12, 2006 | [By Milt Policzer]
From Wang vs. Princess Cruise Lines Ltd., a complaint in Los Angeles County Superior Court: "Plaintiffs' substandard accommodations caused them embarrassment among their traveling companions, who chided and ridiculed Plaintiffs throughout the cruise."
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Six close friends from a Phoenix suburb who play shuffleboard together claimed a $95.3-million multi-state lottery jackpot. The Mesa residents turned in the winning ticket for Saturday's Powerball drawing at lottery headquarters in Phoenix a few hours after the offices opened Monday, a lottery spokeswoman said. The three men and three women chose to take the payout in a lump sum, meaning each winner will receive about $5.2 million after taxes.
NEWS
June 15, 1995 | DAVID HALDANE, David Haldane is a staff writer for the Times Orange County Edition.
Hundreds of Southern Californians are discovering a view of the coast that few others get to see. Gathering in the mornings in small groups on Orange County beaches, they lay down their paddles and slither into wet suits. Then, helping each other out through the surf, they slide aboard colorful little boats heading out to sea.
NEWS
August 11, 1988 | DICK WAGNER, Times Staff Writer
The shuffleboard tournament at the Midway Bar had just begun when it became evident why the man with cigarette packs in both shirt pockets was the favorite. With his large left hand, George Schindler slid a silver disk hard over the long varnished length of rosin-peppered wood. With a startling crack, an opponent's disk that had rested in the 3-point area was knocked off the board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1988 | DICK WAGNER, Times Staff Writer
The shuffleboard tournament at the Midway Bar had just started when it became evident why the man with cigarette packs in both shirt pockets was the favorite. With his large left hand, George Schindler slid a silver disk hard over the long varnished length of rosin-peppered wood. With a startling crack, an opponent's disk that had rested in the 3-point area was knocked off the board.
NEWS
September 10, 1992 | SUSAN PATERNO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Stout laughed hard when asked about his status as the state's shuffleboard champion. "Me? a champion? " The 80-year-old Bellflower resident guffawed. "Well, I guess so. I guess you could say that." Stout won the state championship in January and again in June, securing a place on the U.S. team, which will compete against Australia, Japan and Canada for the world championship in Clearwater, Fla., at the end of the month. Among senior citizens, shuffleboard is a growing sport, Stout said.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Six close friends from a Phoenix suburb who play shuffleboard together claimed a $95.3-million multi-state lottery jackpot. The Mesa residents turned in the winning ticket for Saturday's Powerball drawing at lottery headquarters in Phoenix a few hours after the offices opened Monday, a lottery spokeswoman said. The three men and three women chose to take the payout in a lump sum, meaning each winner will receive about $5.2 million after taxes.
NEWS
October 23, 1999 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 63, Jeanne Hoagland breaks records and shatters myths. When she retired from teaching last year, the Los Angeles resident asked her third-graders what they thought she should do next. Rest home, one youngster said. A baby-sitting job, suggested another. Forget that. Trim and tanned, Hoagland recently has set three national age-group records in track and field, including one for running the mile in 6 minutes, 33 seconds. "But you know what's more important than the competition?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1998 | BONNIE HARRIS HAYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The shuffleboard courts perched above the Pacific Ocean--once pristine and popular, their emerald surfaces as slick as a freshly waxed floor--have buckled and sprouted weeds. There are no waiting lists to play anymore, or crowds of curious spectators squeezed onto metal benches underneath the palm trees. Only four people, four stubborn shuffleboard buffs who have sent disks floating across the courts for 30 years, still use the facility at Heisler Park regularly, every Saturday to be exact.
NEWS
November 13, 1998 | BONNIE HARRIS HAYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The shuffleboard courts perched above the Pacific Ocean--once pristine and popular, their emerald surfaces as slick as a freshly waxed floor--have buckled and sprouted weeds. There are no waiting lists to play anymore, or crowds of curious spectators squeezed onto metal benches underneath the palm trees.
NEWS
May 23, 1997 | DAVE WIELENGA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The day he first reached for a shuffleboard cue, five years ago when his wife and kids signed him up for a Senior Olympics tournament, Rocky Briggs suspected he'd reached the end of the fun-and-games line. "Then I got whomped, about 140 to nothing," recalls Briggs, a retired Teamster, still chagrined. "Suddenly, I was looking at shuffleboard in a different way. I thought a bit, then I said to myself, 'Well, why not?' " Briggs has since become president of the California Shuffleboard Assn.
NEWS
June 15, 1995 | DAVID HALDANE, David Haldane is a staff writer for the Times Orange County Edition.
Hundreds of Southern Californians are discovering a view of the coast that few others get to see. Gathering in the mornings in small groups on Orange County beaches, they lay down their paddles and slither into wet suits. Then, helping each other out through the surf, they slide aboard colorful little boats heading out to sea.
NEWS
May 26, 1986 | MILES CORWIN, Times Staff Writer
The prison has no walls, fences, bars, gun towers or guns. Guards are nattily attired in gray slacks, powder-blue shirts, maroon ties and navy blazers. Amenities include a swimming pool and two full-time recreation directors. Some inmates, who are allowed to leave the prison unescorted, spend their days working in nearby communities and their evenings umpiring games for the local Little League. Incarceration at the Federal Prison Camp at Boron is more a state of mind than a state of siege.
NEWS
November 13, 1998 | BONNIE HARRIS HAYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The shuffleboard courts perched above the Pacific Ocean--once pristine and popular, their emerald surfaces as slick as a freshly waxed floor--have buckled and sprouted weeds. There are no waiting lists to play anymore, or crowds of curious spectators squeezed onto metal benches underneath the palm trees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1995
Katherine Dowling's commentary, "Redefining 'Have' and 'Have Not' " (May 10), represents some of the most specious reasoning to grace your pages. Moving from the case of one welfare mother who stays home to take care of her child--not necessarily the best source for an overview of the origin, development and consequences of the entire social support system in place throughout the U.S.--Dowling moves on to conclude that the happy, carefree recipients of Aid to Families With Dependent Children, Social Security and Social Security Disability benefits are the great winners in society because they have "free time."
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | LEO SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So you say there are no spectator sports in Ventura County? Well, you may just want to check out the Imperial Mobile Home Park in Ventura next week. It's one of the sites for the nine-team statewide shuffleboard tournament beginning Tuesday. Teams will come from as far away as Sacramento and San Diego--and of course Ventura County will be represented. In case you're out of the loop, shuffleboard is a popular game throughout the county.
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