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Shuji Nomura

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1990 | JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mention the fact that Shuji Nomura is one of the highest-paid employees of the city of Los Angeles, and he responds with exasperation. "Yeah. So I hear." Nomura is paid just over $100,000 a year as the Japanese representative of the Port of Los Angeles. Another $159,000 is allocated each year to cover the rent for his office in Tokyo and to pay for some expense account lunches and business meetings. A gregarious cheerleader for the port, Nomura, 58, apparently embraces his job with enthusiasm.
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NEWS
November 29, 1991 | RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles city auditors have been engaged in a "running battle" with the port's Tokyo-based trade promoter, whose outlays for salary, entertainment, private clubs and other expenses have risen to more than $450,000 a year. A new port contract approved earlier this year for Shuji Nomura, a full-time Japanese agent, is up nearly one-third from two years ago, and Nomura's salary, the equivalent of $127,000 a year, is among the highest in city government, records and interviews show.
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NEWS
November 29, 1991 | RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles city auditors have been engaged in a "running battle" with the port's Tokyo-based trade promoter, whose outlays for salary, entertainment, private clubs and other expenses have risen to more than $450,000 a year. A new port contract approved earlier this year for Shuji Nomura, a full-time Japanese agent, is up nearly one-third from two years ago, and Nomura's salary, the equivalent of $127,000 a year, is among the highest in city government, records and interviews show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1990 | JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mention the fact that Shuji Nomura is one of the highest-paid employees of the city of Los Angeles, and he responds with exasperation. "Yeah. So I hear." Nomura is paid just over $100,000 a year as the Japanese representative of the Port of Los Angeles. Another $159,000 is allocated each year to cover the rent for his office in Tokyo and to pay for some expense account lunches and business meetings. A gregarious cheerleader for the port, Nomura, 58, apparently embraces his job with enthusiasm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1992 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a continuing crackdown on entertainment expenses at the Los Angeles Harbor Department, City Controller Rick Tuttle said Thursday he has rejected "excessive" meal and travel charges and is questioning the legitimacy of thousands of dollars in hotel and refreshment bills. In a letter to Harbor Executive Director Ezunial Burts, Tuttle said that expenses for meals, limousines and liquor "violate the 'reasonable person' standard" he uses in weighing the legitimacy of expense claims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1994 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a cup of coffee costing $7 (no refills included), and a no-frills dinner running about $100, it is little wonder that the Port of Los Angeles was spending more than half a million dollars a year to staff a one-person office in Japan. The high costs have prompted the Board of Harbor Commissioners to close the office at the end of January and hire a marketing firm, Japan Marine Services of Tokyo, to represent port interests there. The change will save the port about $200,000 a year.
NEWS
January 6, 1994 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a cup of coffee costing $7 (no refills included), and a no-frills dinner running about $100, it is little wonder that the Port of Los Angeles was spending more than half a million dollars a year to staff a one-person office in Japan. The high costs have prompted the Board of Harbor Commissioners to close the office at the end of this month and hire a marketing firm, Japan Marine Services of Tokyo, to represent port interests there. The change will save the port about $200,000 a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1990 | JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a small matter, really, in the multibillion-dollar world of the Sony Corp. Seven shipping containers crammed with televisions, radios and electronic gadgets had disappeared from a terminal at the Port of Los Angeles. The incident happened nearly six months ago, but port officials were still jittery about it when they called on Sony officials here last week. "The numbers are insignificant," said Ezunial Burts, executive director of the Port of Los Angeles.
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