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Shulamit Aloni

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NEWS
September 28, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, trying to hold his coalition government together, on Sunday chastised his leftist education minister for advocating the full return of the occupied Golan Heights to Syria and for equally controversial comments on religious issues.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2014
Shulamit Aloni Israeli champion of civil rights Shulamit Aloni, an Israeli legislator who championed civil rights and was fiercely critical of Israel's treatment of Palestinians, died Friday at her home in a Tel Aviv suburb. Meretz, the party she helped found and led, announced her death in a statement but did not reveal the cause. She was widely reported to be 85, but her son Nimrod told the New York Times that she was 86 and born in Tel Aviv in 1927. Aloni fought in the 1948 war that led to Israel's creation; and after winning a seat in Israel's parliament, the Knesset, in 1965, she served for 28 years and held a number of cabinet posts.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1992
With Shimon Peres as foreign minister and Shulamit Aloni of the Meretz Party as education minister, the Rabin government will be strongly left-wing, in no way centrist. Indyk continues: "Those who profess a desire for peace in the Middle East have in this new Israeli government their last, best chance." Wrong again! Peace does not, and will not, depend on Yitzhak Rabin. It will come, if it does, only after the leading Arab countries change from the despotisms to real democracies.
NEWS
September 28, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, trying to hold his coalition government together, on Sunday chastised his leftist education minister for advocating the full return of the occupied Golan Heights to Syria and for equally controversial comments on religious issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2014
Shulamit Aloni Israeli champion of civil rights Shulamit Aloni, an Israeli legislator who championed civil rights and was fiercely critical of Israel's treatment of Palestinians, died Friday at her home in a Tel Aviv suburb. Meretz, the party she helped found and led, announced her death in a statement but did not reveal the cause. She was widely reported to be 85, but her son Nimrod told the New York Times that she was 86 and born in Tel Aviv in 1927. Aloni fought in the 1948 war that led to Israel's creation; and after winning a seat in Israel's parliament, the Knesset, in 1965, she served for 28 years and held a number of cabinet posts.
NEWS
November 3, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin's 16-week-old government defeated four no-confidence motions, ensuring continued support for its peace policies. The ultra-Orthodox Shas party had threatened to bolt the coalition unless Rabin fired Education Minister Shulamit Aloni, who has crusaded for secular freedoms. In the end, Shas settled for an apology from Aloni, more influence in secular schools and a promise of restrictions on importing non-kosher meat.
NEWS
November 13, 1995 | Associated Press
Israel will issue a postage stamp honoring slain Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin a month after his assassination, the Postal Authority said Sunday. The stamp, bearing the official photograph of Rabin, will be worth five shekels, or about $1.60. Communications Minister Shulamit Aloni decided not to wait the customary full year from the time of death and instead to issue the stamp 30 days after the assassination, the postal service said in a statement. Rabin was shot Nov.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | From Reuters
Three members of the Israeli Parliament flew to Paris on Tuesday to attend a conference on Middle East peace with members of the Palestine Liberation Organization despite an Israeli ban on talks with the PLO. "I think this law is an embarrassing law, a damaging law, a law of a frightened state lacking self-confidence and courage," said Ora Namir, a member of the Knesset who belongs to the center-left Labor Party. She referred to a 1986 law that bans contacts with "terrorist organizations."
NEWS
May 12, 1993 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unable to work out a compromise between the leftist and religious parties in his fragile coalition government, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin secured a week's delay Tuesday in the resignation of his interior minister, gaining time to bridge the Cabinet's deep divisions.
NEWS
May 7, 1993 | From Associated Press
Faced with the worst political crisis of his 10-month-old government, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin warned feuding parties Thursday that a breakup of his coalition would spell an end to the Middle East peace talks. Army Radio said early today that because of the crisis, Rabin canceled a trip to Strasbourg, France, next week for a meeting of the European Parliament.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1992
With Shimon Peres as foreign minister and Shulamit Aloni of the Meretz Party as education minister, the Rabin government will be strongly left-wing, in no way centrist. Indyk continues: "Those who profess a desire for peace in the Middle East have in this new Israeli government their last, best chance." Wrong again! Peace does not, and will not, depend on Yitzhak Rabin. It will come, if it does, only after the leading Arab countries change from the despotisms to real democracies.
NEWS
March 9, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration issued visas Wednesday permitting three Palestine Liberation Organization officials to attend weekend meetings at Columbia University with Israeli doves, including members of the Knesset or Parliament. State Department spokesman Charles Redman said the Administration waived a 15-year-old law banning PLO members from U.S. visits because none of the three officials--Nabil Shath, Afif Safiyah and Noha Nicholas Tadros--have had "personal involvement in terrorist activity."
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, fed up with the feuding that is tearing apart his coalition government only three months after it was formed, let it be known on Thursday that he is ready to resign unless he gets the full support of all the parties in his Cabinet. Rabin would not actually quit, but seek to form a new, more broadly based and stable government, according to members of his Labor Party.
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