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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2013 | Robin Abcarian
Newt Gingrich can't be serious. Of all the people in the world who ought to be wary of a federal government shutdown, it should be former House Speaker Gingrich, whose political career flamed out spectacularly after he orchestrated two federal shutdowns over a budget impasse with then-President Clinton.  In an essay published Monday , the co-host of CNN's “Crossfire,” has urged House Republicans to stick to their guns and allow the federal government to close down in order to teach the president a (flawed)
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BUSINESS
October 16, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
As the shadow of the shutdown passes, it's proper to be reminded again that this fight involved spending levels that are materially suppressing economic growth and hampering the recovery.  Specifically, the deal soon to be voted on leaves the sequester in place, at least until Jan. 15. This was a sadly predictable outcome of the standoff, as we noted at the outset . True, it does provide for further negotiation and debate on the sequester, but...
NEWS
September 30, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - President Obama blamed the "extreme right wing" of the Republican Party for a budget standoff that has pushed the government to the edge of the first shutdown in 17 years, and he made one last plea Monday to House Republicans to pass a spending bill before a midnight deadline. “One faction of one party in one house of Congress in one branch of government doesn't get to shut down the entire government just to re-fight the results of an election,” Obama said in a brief appearance in the White House briefing room.
NATIONAL
September 27, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - Rep. Dana Rohrabacher of Orange County, the senior California Republican in Congress, was in office during the 1995-96 government shutdowns. He acknowledges that it hurt the GOP, but he sees the risk of another shutdown as "part of the game" of negotiating changes to the healthcare law he hates. "There's never any progress without risk," he told the Los Angeles Times on Thursday. Rep. Eric Swalwell, a freshman Democrat from the San Francisco Bay Area, was 15 when the federal government last shut down.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- A stopgap measure to keep the government funded at a new, lower level cleared a final hurdle in Congress on Thursday and is headed for President Obama's signature, ending the threat of a government shutdown. The House quickly approved the measure, 318-109, following passage in the Senate on Wednesday, as both parties -- and the administration -- sought to avoid a disruptive closing of federal offices. Legislation is needed by March 27 when a temporary measure expires, and Obama is expected to swiftly sign it. The bill locks in the amount of the so-called sequester cuts on federal agencies, the across-the-board reductions that have begun crimping lawmakers' priority projects and home-state industries.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Cathleen Decker
For Republicans thinking of running for president in 2016, one imperative may be rising fast: not to be Bob Dole.  The former Kansas senator was the party's nominee for president in 1996, in the campaign that followed the last big government shutdowns. His opponent, Bill Clinton, succeeded in wrapping the brouhaha -- then, as now, blamed more on Republicans in Congress than on the Democratic president -- around Dole's neck, tight as a noose and just as lethal, politically. In ads and speeches, Clinton repeatedly castigated the “Dole-Gingrich” agenda, tying the senator to the prime mover behind the shutdowns, House Speaker Newt Gingrich.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Federal employees have been furloughed, federal assistance for those needing food has been threatened and tourists everywhere have been shut out of monuments and national parks as a result of the partial shutdown of the U.S. government. But the Washington budget standoff that triggered the shutdown has had an unexpected effect: Cancellation of a proposed KKK demonstration at Gettysburg in Pennsylvania. The Confederate White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan had received a special use permit to hold a demonstration at the Gettysburg National Military Park on Saturday.
NEWS
September 30, 2013 | By David Lauter
Much of the federal government will shut down as of midnight. What will be closing, why and what impact will it have? Question: Why a shutdown? Answer: Every year, Congress has to approve laws, known as appropriations, that provide money for federal agencies. The new budget year begins on Oct. 1, and Congress has failed to pass a single one of the appropriations. An effort to pass a stop-gap bill to provide temporary money has stalled in Congress: Republicans have insisted they will not approve the stop-gap measure unless Democrats agree to block money for President Obama's healthcare law, and Democrats have refused to do that.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
We'll be seeing lots more data like these, but the White House Council of Economic Advisers is reporting that the government shutdown took a huge bite out of economic growth--and that the impact will linger.  The chart above shows the effect on economic confidence, one of eight daily or weekly economic indicators tracked by the CEA. (The three lines follow three separate surveys, Gallup, Rasmussen and the University of Michigan.) Put briefly, confidence fell off a cliff. That's likely to bleed into the holiday period.
NEWS
March 29, 2012 | By Richard Simon
Congress averted a threatened shutdown of the federal highway program but continues to face a bumpy ride in crafting a multi-year transportation bill that seeks to create jobs and ease traffic congestion. The Republican-controlled House on Thursday approved a three-month extension in highway spending, and the Democratic-led Senate grudgingly followed suit, maintaining the government's authority to collect gasoline taxes and fund projects beyond Saturday. As has become all too familiar, lawmakers acted at the last minute to prevent the loss of $110 million a day in tax revenues, the slowing down of projects and the furlough of thousands of federal workers.
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