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June 21, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
We've all stood in front of the rows of too-generic, over-syrupy, more-a-cough-than-a-chuckle or ethnically tone-deaf selection of greeting cards available at stores. In an effort to get personal, Hallmark and Shutterfly are teaming up to offer more than 1,000 exclusive Hallmark-designed customizable cards. They will be available on Shutterfly's new personalized greeting card site, Treat , which features integrated scheduling and reminders directly connected with Facebook. "The millions of consumers who already store photos on Shutterfly will now have easy access to Hallmark's creative and editorial expertise as they create their own individualized cards through a quality experience on Shutterfly," Rob Bensman, Hallmark vice president of strategic alliances, said in a news release . This fall, Shutterfly.com and tinyprints.com will offer a collection of Hallmark holiday designs, according to the release.
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BUSINESS
June 21, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
We've all stood in front of the rows of too-generic, over-syrupy, more-a-cough-than-a-chuckle or ethnically tone-deaf selection of greeting cards available at stores. In an effort to get personal, Hallmark and Shutterfly are teaming up to offer more than 1,000 exclusive Hallmark-designed customizable cards. They will be available on Shutterfly's new personalized greeting card site, Treat , which features integrated scheduling and reminders directly connected with Facebook. "The millions of consumers who already store photos on Shutterfly will now have easy access to Hallmark's creative and editorial expertise as they create their own individualized cards through a quality experience on Shutterfly," Rob Bensman, Hallmark vice president of strategic alliances, said in a news release . This fall, Shutterfly.com and tinyprints.com will offer a collection of Hallmark holiday designs, according to the release.
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BUSINESS
December 13, 1999 | CHARLES PILLER
When the founder of three high-tech heavyweights--Silicon Graphics, Netscape Communications and Healtheon--speaks, Silicon Valley listens. That's why Jim Clark's latest new new thing, Web-based photo processor Shutterfly.com (which he serves as chairman) has been generating buzz in an already-crowded market. The Redwood Shores, Calif.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2006 | From Dow Jones/the Associated Press
Shutterfly Inc.'s pending initial public stock offering provides the company with an opportunity to address some of the challenges it faces to remain one of the top online photography websites. Those challenges include increasing competition and customers' growing preference for a service that Shutterfly doesn't provide: picking up pictures they ordered online at their local retail store, which is faster than waiting for prints in the mail. The Redwood City, Calif.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2005 | Terril Yue Jones, Times Staff Writer
Despite being a self-described technophobe, Peggy Larez used a computer to design a hardback book of photos of her 14-year-old son, who is hospitalized while awaiting a heart transplant. "The books are really, really nice. They're beautiful," said Larez, who plans to give one to her mother. "It's the best present, and everybody likes books. And, oh my gosh, it was so fun." To create her book, Larez used Seiko Epson Corp.'
BUSINESS
February 23, 2006 | Terril Yue Jones, Times Staff Writer
Hewlett-Packard Co. helped make dropping off rolls of film at the drug store seem so old-fashioned. Now the computer and printer maker that spearheaded the shift to processing digital photos at home is focused on making the drug store fashionable again. HP is expected to announce today that it is setting up kiosks in supermarkets and drug stores where shoppers can order prints, greeting cards, calendars, posters and photo albums and pick up the finished products in less than an hour.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2001 | MICHAEL LIEDTKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ron Hurst doesn't own a digital camera. But he plans to use a computer to process, view and perhaps even touch up all the family photos he took over the holidays. Even as he continued to rely on old-fashioned film over the last year, Hurst was able to improve his pictures courtesy of a digital photography Web site. "I love it. It's like having your own digital darkroom," said Hurst, 53, of Vallejo, Calif. "For an old guy like me, this was a great vehicle to break into the digital age."
HOME & GARDEN
December 23, 2004 | Brett Levy, Times Staff Writer
Well, congratulations, you've joined the legions of Americans who will shoot 34.5 billion digital photos this year. Sure, you bought that digital camera for the "free" photos, but suddenly there's no room left on the hard drive to unload shots of the kids unwrapping presents. While digital cameras are being snapped up at a frenzied rate -- more than 24.
NEWS
June 17, 2001 | BETH DUFF-BROWN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Betty Coulter is a typical 21-year-old college grad from Illinois. She wears bell-bottom jeans and is a faithful fan of "Friends" and "Buffy the Vampire Slayer." Or so says Betty, if asked, while taking calls from Americans. Her real name would be difficult for those callers to pronounce: Savitha Balasubramanyam. And if they listen closely, her Midwestern accent has a touch of South Asian exotic. Balasubramanyam is Indian.
NEWS
September 19, 2004 | Ted Anthony, Associated Press Writer
America's first postage stamps appeared in 1847 -- rough, unperforated squares of ink and paper that depicted George Washington and Benjamin Franklin. The portraits in miniature oozed gravitas and, in their quiet way, nudged along a growing national identity. Over the next 157 years, hundreds of American luminaries, landscapes and milestones have appeared inside the small canvas that we stick onto the envelope's corner: Abraham Lincoln. Daniel Webster. The Statue of Liberty. The moon missions.
NEWS
April 12, 2001
Director John Lasseter was a hero among fans of film animation in the late 1980s for his beautifully rendered, witty short films that helped pioneer the use of computer animation. Then came the gigantic success of his first feature, "Toy Story," the highest-grossing film of 1995. Lasseter was catapulted to Hollywood superstar status. Lasseter's subsequent features, "A Bug's Life" and "Toy Story 2," also were huge hits, and he is now writing and directing his fourth, "Monsters, Inc."
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