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Shuttle Buses

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1995
In an effort to reduce air pollution, Los Angeles International Airport purchased seven shuttle buses and three airfield buses powered by liquefied natural gas. A $600,000 grant from the South Coast Air Quality Management District will help cover the difference in cost between diesel-fueled buses and the more expensive vehicles that run on natural gas. "Even though the diesel-powered buses may be cheaper, in the long run, it's not good for the...
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OPINION
January 24, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Commuter buses are usually pretty noncontroversial. Governments like them because they get single-passenger cars off the road and reduce air pollution. And riders like them because they can relax on the way to and from work and save on gas and other expenses. Cleaner, greener and more convenient - everyone's happy, right? Not in San Francisco, where there's been a growing fight over the shuttle buses provided by Google, Facebook and other tech companies to ferry workers from their San Francisco homes to their Silicon Valley jobs.
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TRAVEL
July 20, 1997
Re: "Bear Afoot in the Park" (June 15): Frankly, Glacier National Park doesn't need any more tourists traveling the park by car. You did not point out that a recent national survey listed U.S. National Parks in trouble. Glacier was one, and the reason was "traffic." Perhaps until our national parks are provided more funding for repairs, and shuttle buses become the standard means for witnessing their treasures, we should learn to appreciate our local attractions. MEYER CHESSIN Missoula, Mont.
WORLD
December 13, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
PRETORIA, South Africa - Huge queues of people waited, some of them for two days, to see the body of former South African President Nelson Mandela lying in state in Pretoria. But thousands more were turned away disappointed as viewing ended Friday. Tempers frayed and scuffles broke out in front of the Union Buildings, the seat of government, where the casket spent three days, and at locations where people lined up to take shuttle buses to the site. Police were deployed to control the crowds, with some people trying to break through police barricades at the Union Buildings to get to see the body.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1988
"For only $5 per day you get a fully secured parking lot that's open 24 hours a day" reads the ad for the new North Annex Parking Lot at John Wayne Airport. It certainly looked secure when I parked there Wednesday morning (Feb. 3)--the lot was surrounded by a chain link fence topped with barbed wire and the only entrance and exit was on one side. A half dozen cars were clustered near the lot's exit when I arrived. Since I was returning late Friday night, Feb. 5, I parked among the other cars under a street lamp and within 100 feet of the attendant's booth.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | ELSTON CARR
In an effort to improve public transportation in South-Central Los Angeles, two DASH shuttle buses began limited service last week along a six-mile route that connects with RTD lines. The new transportation comes after a yearlong campaign by Councilwoman Rita Walters to expand public transportation in the 9th District, which has one of the highest bus riderships in the county, according to the RTD.
NEWS
January 11, 2012 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
In honor of Ben Franklin's birthday Jan. 17, the American Assn. for Nude Recreation  is telling the public that the Founding Father was fond of spending time in the nude as part of his daily routine. “You, too, can enjoy an 'air bath' just as Benjamin Franklin did 260 years ago, not just in your own backyard and pool, but also at over 260 AANR facilities,” the organization says . . . . Sixty vehicles passed through a sobriety checkpoint at Grand Canyon National Park just after Christmas.
WORLD
December 13, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
PRETORIA, South Africa - Huge queues of people waited, some of them for two days, to see the body of former South African President Nelson Mandela lying in state in Pretoria. But thousands more were turned away disappointed as viewing ended Friday. Tempers frayed and scuffles broke out in front of the Union Buildings, the seat of government, where the casket spent three days, and at locations where people lined up to take shuttle buses to the site. Police were deployed to control the crowds, with some people trying to break through police barricades at the Union Buildings to get to see the body.
OPINION
January 24, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Commuter buses are usually pretty noncontroversial. Governments like them because they get single-passenger cars off the road and reduce air pollution. And riders like them because they can relax on the way to and from work and save on gas and other expenses. Cleaner, greener and more convenient - everyone's happy, right? Not in San Francisco, where there's been a growing fight over the shuttle buses provided by Google, Facebook and other tech companies to ferry workers from their San Francisco homes to their Silicon Valley jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1991 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Highway Patrol on Tuesday shut down a charter bus line that takes passengers to and from John Wayne Airport as part of a crackdown on shuttles that violate state safety codes, CHP officials said. In shutting down the 18-bus service owned by Ground System Inc., the CHP and transportation officials said they are warning all private charter services to comply with safety codes, CHP spokesman Mel Baker said.
NEWS
January 11, 2012 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
In honor of Ben Franklin's birthday Jan. 17, the American Assn. for Nude Recreation  is telling the public that the Founding Father was fond of spending time in the nude as part of his daily routine. “You, too, can enjoy an 'air bath' just as Benjamin Franklin did 260 years ago, not just in your own backyard and pool, but also at over 260 AANR facilities,” the organization says . . . . Sixty vehicles passed through a sobriety checkpoint at Grand Canyon National Park just after Christmas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2008 | Paul Pringle and Ari B. Bloomekatz, Times Staff Writers
The lines of fans were as long as the distance to the left-field fence was short. The memories were even longer. Half a century slipped off the calendar Saturday night and baseball attendance records were shattered as the Dodgers returned to the arena that welcomed them here for good from Brooklyn -- the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2006 | Jennifer Oldham, Times Staff Writer
As part of a plan to reduce traffic around Los Angeles International Airport, officials Monday approved a park-and-ride that will offer nonstop bus service from Union Station downtown to LAX. The Union Station FlyAway, scheduled to open March 15, is the first of eight park-and-rides that the city's airport agency hopes to open over the next decade to provide a mass transit option to LAX. Officials also are considering locations in Chatsworth, Inglewood, Long Beach and Sylmar.
TRAVEL
July 14, 2002 | JOHN McKINNEY
The classic hike from the floor of Utah's Zion Canyon to the rimrock Observation Point still offers everything it always has: a sampling of slick-rock country, passage through a narrow canyon and stunning views. But now hikers will find more. More quietude. Count me as an enthusiastic supporter of Zion National Park's shuttle system, started in 2000. During the peak season of March to October, visitors must ride buses into the heart of Zion Canyon, leaving their cars behind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2001
The current wait at Parking Lot B to get onto a shuttle bus to go to the main LAX terminal is completely unacceptable, and the individual in charge of this fiasco should be embarrassed beyond belief. Passengers are fighting for taxis (some offering rides for $10 per person off the meter) as they wait in interminably long lines, only to have to be packed like sardines as they frantically scramble to squeeze into a dangerously overcrowded shuttle. As a commercial airline pilot who has traveled to a number of Third World airports, I can honestly say LAX has joined their ranks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2001 | MIKE ANTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roberta Cote abandoned her car for Amtrak to ease the pain of the 60-mile commute from her home in Encinitas to her job at John Wayne Airport. Comfortable and reliable, the train whisks her where she needs to go: Straight to her other car, the one with the faded paint, leaky window and seats that look like a tiger mauled them. "I call it my Fred Flintstone car," Cote said of the decade-old Saturn she keeps at the Irvine train station--her garage away from home. "It had been in a wreck.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2001
The current wait at Parking Lot B to get onto a shuttle bus to go to the main LAX terminal is completely unacceptable, and the individual in charge of this fiasco should be embarrassed beyond belief. Passengers are fighting for taxis (some offering rides for $10 per person off the meter) as they wait in interminably long lines, only to have to be packed like sardines as they frantically scramble to squeeze into a dangerously overcrowded shuttle. As a commercial airline pilot who has traveled to a number of Third World airports, I can honestly say LAX has joined their ranks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1991 | ERIC BAILEY and JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Nearly a quarter of the shuttle buses and vans ferrying passengers to John Wayne Airport and other spots in Orange County had serious mechanical problems during recent inspections, and state authorities are stepping up efforts to enforce safety standards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tens of thousands of Valley residents limped through the transit strike Monday, hampered by frustrating waits, late arrivals at jobs and no-shows at school campuses. Although it was Day Three of the walk-off by Metropolitan Transportation Authority workers, the bus and subway shutdown hit hard as many students and employees struggled to find transit alternatives for the first time. In the Valley, about 180,000 people ride the MTA's Red Line subway and the 34 bus routes that travel here.
TRAVEL
July 20, 1997
Re: "Bear Afoot in the Park" (June 15): Frankly, Glacier National Park doesn't need any more tourists traveling the park by car. You did not point out that a recent national survey listed U.S. National Parks in trouble. Glacier was one, and the reason was "traffic." Perhaps until our national parks are provided more funding for repairs, and shuttle buses become the standard means for witnessing their treasures, we should learn to appreciate our local attractions. MEYER CHESSIN Missoula, Mont.
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