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SCIENCE
September 11, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
NASA administrator Sean O'Keefe said Wednesday that the cost of fixing all the problems with the space shuttle fleet could top $2.2 billion -- double the estimated price tag given to Congress a year ago. O'Keefe, testifying before the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, was pressed on whether that estimate again could rise. "I don't see any new unknowns coming down the road," O'Keefe said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2012 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
A diva requires special handling and an entourage. Whatever the stage, the space shuttle Endeavour gets both. A constellation of engineers and assembly line workers designed and built the shuttle in Southern California. A universe of scientists hurled it into space on 25 missions. And in the coming weeks, after Endeavour is flown from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida to Los Angeles, a cast of hundreds of engineers, police officers and utility and construction workers will ferry the shuttle over city streets to the California Science Center, where it will be permanently displayed.
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SCIENCE
May 2, 2009 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
NASA plans to eliminate 900 manufacturing jobs over the next five months as it prepares to retire its space shuttle fleet in 2010, officials at the space agency said. The first 160 layoff notices went out Friday, primarily to contractors producing the space shuttle fuel tanks outside New Orleans and the shuttle solid rocket boosters in Utah. The shuttle fleet is due to be retired after eight more flights to finish building and equipping the International Space Station and a final servicing call to the Hubble Space Telescope.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Bob Kahl slips in through a side door of the vast, abandoned hangar and looks at what's left of the assembly plant where he worked for nearly 40 years. He remembers the hum of power tools, the biting aroma of cutting oil, swarms of workers plugging away on a labyrinth of yellow scaffolding. All that's left is a few piles of broken concrete and a sea of colorless dust that coats a Palmdale factory floor the size of two football fields. "Welcome to the birthplace of America's space shuttle fleet," said Kahl, 60, smiling.
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An inspection of the entire space shuttle fleet was ordered at Cape Canaveral, Fla., after NASA found tiny cracks in the heat-resistant covering on the shuttle Atlantis. A Nov. 19 mission for the Defense Department may be postponed, officials said. Engineers found the hairline cracks when they removed seals from the leading edges of the wings during a routine inspection of Atlantis.
NEWS
January 14, 1987
A panel of outside experts said that NASA needs to do a better job of ranking the potential safety hazards in its space shuttle fleet. The recommendation came from a panel of the National Research Council, the research arm of the National Academy of Sciences. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has a "critical items list" that identifies pieces of hardware whose failure could lead to the destruction of the shuttle and loss of the crew.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1986
The Times editorial suggestion (July 9), "White Elephant," that the space shuttle launch complex at Vandenberg Air Force Base be abandoned ignores several important points: --The facility has already been built. With the exception of one item involving exhaust vents, all questions regarding safety at the new Western spaceport have been satisfactorily answered. Air Force engineers say they will propose a solution to the vent problem shortly. It would be folly to walk away from a $3-billion investment on the basis of one, soon-to-be resolved, question.
NATIONAL
August 13, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
NASA said it has discovered more cracked equipment, this time in the massive 1960s-vintage movers used to haul space shuttles to the launch pads. Technicians at Cape Canaveral had just finished fixing fuel-line cracks inside the shuttle Atlantis. The newest cracks are in the bearings of the Apollo-era crawlers and could mean more launch delays. Three small cracks in Atlantis' plumbing were fixed, putting the shuttle on track for a launch as early as Sept. 28.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2003 | Nick Anderson, Times Staff Writer
Despite the Columbia disaster, NASA officials are forging ahead with plans to upgrade the shuttle fleet to keep it flying until at least 2015 and possibly several years longer, a senior space agency official said Monday. Michael C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1986
Your editorial is a further example of the misinformation and indecision afflicting our nation's space program. The loss of the Challenger was only the most dramatic of many recent setbacks, due in large part to attempts to be a world leader in space development using penny-pinching micro-management. Repeated projections of the demand for space traffic since the beginning of shuttle flights in 1981 have shown that a four-orbiter fleet is inadequate. The decision by President Carter to cut the fleet from five to four was made against the analyses of NASA, industry and independent consultants.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
With the nation's space shuttle program coming to a close, Boeing Co. issued layoff notices Friday to 100 employees at its Space Exploration division in Huntington Beach. The last workday for the workers is scheduled to be Aug. 5, pending completion of the final shuttle mission. Space shuttle Atlantis is slated to blast off from Cape Canaveral, Fla., on July 8. In all, Boeing, a major subcontractor on the shuttle program, handed 60-day advance layoff notices to about 510 employees companywide.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2011 | By Mark K. Matthews
Days before Friday's planned launch of space shuttle Endeavour, officials at Kennedy Space Center in Florida are bracing for monster crowds and the logistical nightmares expected to accompany a presidential visit to watch the second-to-last flight of the shuttle fleet. Chief among their concerns — other than a safe flight — is the arrival of President Obama, his wife, Michelle, and their daughters Malia and Sasha. The Obamas are expected to be joined by wounded Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.)
SCIENCE
May 9, 2009 | John Johnson Jr.
As NASA prepares to return to the moon, the head of a panel asked by President Obama to review the space agency's future said Friday that he planned to call upon the expertise of astronauts and engineers in determining whether NASA is on the right track. "We're going to take a fresh look and go where the facts are," said Norman Augustine, who will head up the 10-member panel. Augustine, the former chief executive of one of NASA's biggest contractors, Lockheed Martin Corp.
SCIENCE
May 2, 2009 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
NASA plans to eliminate 900 manufacturing jobs over the next five months as it prepares to retire its space shuttle fleet in 2010, officials at the space agency said. The first 160 layoff notices went out Friday, primarily to contractors producing the space shuttle fuel tanks outside New Orleans and the shuttle solid rocket boosters in Utah. The shuttle fleet is due to be retired after eight more flights to finish building and equipping the International Space Station and a final servicing call to the Hubble Space Telescope.
NATIONAL
May 21, 2005 | From Reuters
Space shuttle Discovery sailed through a second test of its redesigned fuel tank Friday, clearing the path for final equipment upgrades before NASA can return the shuttle fleet to flight. "We had just a perfect test as far as I'm concerned," shuttle program manager Bill Parsons said during a teleconference with reporters after the test. Managers ordered the fuel tank retested after problems surfaced during a test last month. The U.S.
SCIENCE
September 11, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
NASA administrator Sean O'Keefe said Wednesday that the cost of fixing all the problems with the space shuttle fleet could top $2.2 billion -- double the estimated price tag given to Congress a year ago. O'Keefe, testifying before the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, was pressed on whether that estimate again could rise. "I don't see any new unknowns coming down the road," O'Keefe said.
OPINION
February 9, 1986
In T. A. Heppenheimer's articles (Editorial Pages, Jan. 29 and 31) he bemoans the fact that the shuttle, a five-year-old vehicle, was built with 10-year-old technology. He suggests concentrating on developing the new technology of the Trans-Atmospheric Vehicle (TAV, or space plane) rather than rebuilding the shuttle fleet, even though the TAV's technology will also be 10 years old five years after it flies. This leads to the problem with Heppenheimer's suggestions: the TAV is a fine idea, and should be pursued, but it doesn't solve the immediate problem--we are short on spacecraft to launch large payloads, both military and civilian.
NEWS
July 2, 1988 | Associated Press
Space workers will hold a special Fourth of July ceremony when they move the shuttle Discovery to the launching pad to be readied for the first space shuttle mission since the Challenger tragedy. One of the five astronauts scheduled to fly the early September mission and National Aeronautics and Space Administration officials will watch from a grandstand as the spaceship is rolled out of an assembly building into the glare of spotlights at 12:01 a.m. Monday.
OPINION
January 3, 2004
I appreciated your excellent series of articles by Times staff writer Robert Lee Hotz detailing the space shuttle Columbia disaster and the subsequent investigation, including the clash between engineering and bureaucracy within NASA (Dec. 21-26). However, I was stunned by your Dec. 28 editorial, which recommended the permanent grounding of the space shuttle fleet and went even further in suggesting that the United States abdicate leadership in manned space flight. Your editorial shows an incredible lack of forward vision.
NATIONAL
September 4, 2003 | Nick Anderson, Times Staff Writer
Following a scathing report on the lapses that led to the loss of the space shuttle Columbia, Republican and Democratic senators on Wednesday pressed the NASA administrator to find those responsible for the disaster and hold them accountable. But Sean O'Keefe, NASA chief, refused to assign blame during his congressional testimony or in a subsequent meeting with reporters.
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