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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sheriff's investigators have established that a top executive at Shuwa Investment Corp., a huge player in the Los Angeles real estate market, paid the rent for a 28-year-old Little Tokyo nightclub hostess whose skull was found in the Angeles National Forest. Los Angeles County Sheriff's Lt. Richard Longshore, lead detective on the case, said the investigators' findings confirmed what had been alleged in a Japanese magazine about the executive, who is now dead.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, a hiker in the Angeles National Forest stumbled upon a human skull as she searched for a place to relieve herself. But who it belonged to remained unknown until last weekend when Los Angeles County sheriff's investigators identified the skull and other remains as those of Kumi Kojima, a 28-year-old Japanese hostess who entertained rich businessmen at a Little Tokyo nightclub.
NEWS
May 16, 1987 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
The Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles has received a major gift from Shuwa Investments Corp., museum officials announced this week. Although the amount of the contribution was not revealed, William Kieschnick, chairman of the museum board, said it was "a six-figure amount," somewhat smaller than the speculative figure of $1 million released in early accounts. Shuwa, the U.S.
REAL ESTATE
April 9, 1989
Lifeco Services Corp. has signed a 10-year lease, valued at $2.9 million, for 13,327 square feet of space in Chase Plaza, 801 S. Grand Ave., in downtown Los Angeles. The corporate travel agency will occupy the fifth floor beginning May 1 as its southwest regional headquarters. Charles Dunn Co., Los Angeles, in conjunction with the Office Network affiliate in Houston, represented Lifeco, while Cushman Realty Corp., Los Angeles, represented Shuwa Investments Corp., the lessor.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bank of America to Remain Downtown: Shuwa Investments Corp., owner of the Arco Plaza at 6th and Flower streets in downtown Los Angeles, said Bank of America has renewed its lease at the building and will also expand. The deal, for a combined 470,000 square feet of office space, was valued by commercial real estate agents at about $115 million and is one of the largest commercial transactions to be completed in more than a year.
NEWS
June 25, 1994 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taco Bell Corp. officials' decision to stay in the same 12-story mirrored office tower they've occupied for eight years was largely due to a sweetheart deal wrested from a landlord already reeling from the real estate slump, sources said. Under the new lease, which starts early next year, Taco Bell stands to slash more than $350,000 a month from its rent costs. The 280,000-square-foot building's Tokyo-based owner, Shuwa Investments Corp.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bank of America to Remain Downtown: Shuwa Investments Corp., owner of the Arco Plaza at 6th and Flower streets in downtown Los Angeles, said Bank of America has renewed its lease at the building and will also expand. The deal, for a combined 470,000 square feet of office space, was valued by commercial real estate agents at about $115 million and is one of the largest commercial transactions to be completed in more than a year.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1991 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials at Shuwa Investments Corp. were in an exuberant mood when the firm published its "Faces of Shuwa" commemorative book in 1987. "I love America," the U.S. arm of Japan's Shuwa Corp. proclaimed as it heralded its role in tapping the "vast potential of U.S. real estate investment." Just a year earlier, Shuwa had splashed onto the U.S. real estate scene with its first major commercial purchase--Los Angeles' Arco Towers. It quickly sank nearly $3 billion in U.S.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1990 | From Reuters
Rumors that major Japanese property developer Shuwa Corp. is in financial difficulties shook the Tokyo stock market on Wednesday, reinforcing fears of a spate property-related business failures. "The go-go days for property developers are over for the time being," said Mark Brown, analyst at Barclays de Zoete Wedd Securities (Japan). "It's going to get worse before it gets better."
BUSINESS
October 6, 1990 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first big building bought by Japanese investors in Orange County may be up for sale. A Shuwa Corp. spokesman said the company has been approached by "several brokers" about selling the Taco Bell tower in Irvine, but added, "we don't know if we'll sell the building." Tokyo-based Shuwa issued a one-sentence statement in response to a Wall Street Journal article Friday that quoted brokers as saying the building was already on the market.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1989 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
Shuwa Investments Corp., the giant Japanese real estate company, made its first move into Europe on Friday with a $160-million purchase of a London property in a joint venture with Tishman West Cos. Tishman Shuwa Victoria Partners acquired a 250-year leasehold for the 195,000-square-foot Ashdown House in London from the Church Commissioners for England and Shell Pensions Trust Ltd.
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