Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSi Zentner
IN THE NEWS

Si Zentner

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 3, 2000
Si Zentner, 82, Las Vegas trombonist who performed frequently at Disneyland and made a hit recording of "Up a Lazy River." His 1961 instrumental arrangement of the old standard became his theme song for the rest of his life. Born Simon Hugh Zentner in Brooklyn, N.Y., he played with the big bands of Les Brown, Harry James and Jimmy Dorsey. Then Zentner settled in Los Angeles as a studio musician for MGM until he formed his own big band in 1958.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 3, 2000
Si Zentner, 82, Las Vegas trombonist who performed frequently at Disneyland and made a hit recording of "Up a Lazy River." His 1961 instrumental arrangement of the old standard became his theme song for the rest of his life. Born Simon Hugh Zentner in Brooklyn, N.Y., he played with the big bands of Les Brown, Harry James and Jimmy Dorsey. Then Zentner settled in Los Angeles as a studio musician for MGM until he formed his own big band in 1958.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 27, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE, Bill Kohlhaase is a free-lance writer who regularly covers jazz for the The Times Orange County Edition.
Bob Florence has written music for a seemingly endless list of big-name musicians, including Buddy Rich, Count Basie, Sergio Mendes, Si Zentner, Louis Bellson, Harry James (his rendition of "Up a Lazy River" was a minor hit for the bandleader in the early 1960s), and Doc Severinsen's "Tonight Show" band. In addition, Florence also writes for and accompanies vocalists Vikki Carr and Julie Andrews. But the ensemble he most enjoys composing for is his own Limited Edition big band.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Country music makes a comeback at "Bash '96," this year's edition of the annual Orange County Musicians Festival and the county's biggest music party of the year, planned for Sunday at the Red Lion Hotel in Costa Mesa. "Bash '96" will devote a space to country sounds complete with dance floor. "We had a room for country music during our first few years," says Frank Amoss, president of Orange County Musicians Union Local 7, which sponsors the 26-year-old event.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2001 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jay Migliori, a charter member of the Grammy-winning group Supersax who played with everyone from Woody Herman to Frank Zappa in a career that spanned more than five decades, has died. He was 70. Migliori, a Mission Viejo resident, died Sunday of colon cancer. Migliori, a saxophonist who described his style of playing as "modern acoustic jazz with roots in bebop," was a working musician who seldom lacked for work.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ask bandleader-trombonist Si Zentner what happened to big bands, and here's what he'll tell you: "The band business didn't die. The bandleaders died." The 78-year-old musician, whose orchestra plays Sunday at Orange Coast College, comes from a mold that long ago was broken. A product of the bands of Les Brown, Harry James and Jimmy Dorsey, Zentner hails from a generation in which the personality of the bandleader defined the band, and the leader was the orchestra's main soloist.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Zan Stewart writes regularly about music for The Times
"Hard left." That's the direction composer-arranger-bandleader-pianist Bob Florence says his life took when he was a student at Los Angeles City College in the early '50s. "I had been heading toward becoming a concert pianist," he said the other day. "I had been playing piano since I was 4, and had been performing concerts since age 7 or 8, though I also listened to jazz and pop music." Then at L. A.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1986 | ZAN STEWART
"Pop music has changed so much since the '40s that even a genius like George Gershwin wouldn't be able to sell his music today." That stern observation comes from vibist Charlie Shoemake, a man who writes songs himself and has a fondness for both the great pop music and jazz classics of the '30s, '40s and '50s.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1999 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Seated at a modest electronic keyboard, composer and bandleader Bob Florence peered at his sheet music over the top of his eyeglasses, seeming to seek inspiration to perform for the crowd packing the venerable Lighthouse nightclub. Find it he did Wednesday at Redondo Beach's former bastion of West Coast jazz, delighting the sunset concertgoers with a spirited solo on a bebop piece by trumpeter Carl Saunders, and again on his arrangement of the standard "Whisper Not."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1992 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bob Florence likes to think of himself as a realist. Much as he'd like to view his big band as a viable musical entity, he knows it's not going to get nearly as much work as he would like. "This has been one of the best years that I can think of," he says with a whimsical chuckle. "We've had maybe 10 gigs so far." Tonight at the Hyatt Newporter, the ripsnorting Florence ensemble will add one more to the list.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|